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swampmonkey85

mono? florocarbon? or braid?

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i am about to buy alot of new line and i usually just use the pline cxx but i was wondering what conditions should i go to a  floro or braid line? what are the benefits and downfalls of each and are there certain lures different types of lines work better on? thanks

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I use all three. 

Braid for jigging.  It doesn't stretch, and gives me a good feel of the bottom.  However, I use it with a 20 pound fluoro leader.

It is extremely vulnerable to ragged rocks, and I've lost a couple of nice fish because of that.

To get an idea of how fragile it is, try it on a dental floss cutter.  It parts easier than the floss.  It is great in vegetation such as lily pads.  It saws through them like a scythe.

Mono and fluoro I use for finesse fishing.  They stretch therefore reducing the input of action by the rod.  Less is more when finesse fishing.

Six pound test is what I spool with for mono and fluoro.  I use a swivel, and twenty pound test fluoro for a leader.

Toothy critters, such as pickerel, and light mono and fluro lines do not play nice together.

Then there is the issue of whether you want the line to sink or float. 

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I use braid for jigs, frogs and punching mats.

I use floro for everything else.

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Most of the lakes where you live have lots of grass. Try the braid with your traps when fishing around the grass. It makes a huge difference. You can rip the lure out of the grass without the strech that mono gives you. Lots of strikes when you do this. I keep one trap tied to braid year round.

Try it out on Lake Tyler and see how you like it. That's an awsome lake BTW.

Good luck

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Mono for topwater and cranks.

Braid for frogs and a C-rig,swimming jigs.

Flou. for everything else! ;)

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For the OP, I'd say a spool of 10 or 12# CXX, 50# PowerPro, and 8# XPS Fluorocarbon would cover most of you bases.  If you wanted some heavier fluoro for leader, then a small spool of 12 to 17# will serve you a season's worth of fish.

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Braid is supposed to be the strongest so I don't understand the suggestions of using such high test... I have caught toothy 12 lb fish on 8 lb PowerPro without a problem, I have ripped cranks out of heavy weeds no problem, I have bent hooks on tree/stump snagged baits using 8 lb braid.... so personally, I stick with 20lb or lighter, I see no need to use 65 lb test unless you plan to target 40-65 lb fish

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Braid is supposed to be the strongest so I don't understand the suggestions of using such high test... I have caught toothy 12 lb fish on 8 lb PowerPro without a problem, I have ripped cranks out of heavy weeds no problem, I have bent hooks on tree/stump snagged baits using 8 lb braid.... so personally, I stick with 20lb or lighter, I see no need to use 65 lb test unless you plan to target 40-65 lb fish

It has NOTHING to do with the size of the fish, and EVERYTHING to do with the way it handles, and the cover you're fishing. 

Spool up your flipping stick with 8# braid, and hit the slop.  Tell me it wasn't the most frustrating day on the water picking out backlashes, breakoffs, and line buried in the spool.

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I've also caught fish in some pretty dense crap on 20lb braid. The heavier stuff is for just in case.

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20lb PowerPro is like $3 less than the same amount of 65lb PowerPro. Plus, I feel a heck of a lot more comfortable pulling a 4lb fish +2lbs of weeds +however many lbs of drag that creates in the water with 65lb. Sure, you can get away with 20lbs a lot of times, but for $3/spool I'd rather not take the chance.

Also, if you truly knew how to use a casting reel then you wouldn't be spending so much time fussing with it. For an experienced user it doesn't take any more time away from fishing than a spinning reel.

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