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Skeet22

Throwing finesse baits on casting gear?

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I have a nice Spinning set up I keep in my rod box with light line but I alwas find myself throwing weightless trick worms/finesse worms on a 6'6" MH rod with a old reen Curado 201 spooled with 10# Yo Zuri. I know I could get a little more distance with the spinning set up but is there any other advantage i'm missing out on? I throw wacky rigged trick worms quite often and prefer not fooling with flipping a bail on a spining reel.I know its popular to use spinning reels for shaky head or finesse fishing in general, just trying to understand the real benefit in spining over casting I guess.

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Im guessing that the advantage of spinning vs casting is that with spinning you have the light line, small baits, and finesse approaches in open water to light cover.  The casting side of it is that you would be able to cast to moderate to heavy cover or structure and the ability to pull the fish out of that cover.  Conversely, spinning allows you to play the fish more and tire it out so landing it is easier. This is just my thoughts on your question. Im sure there will be others with better answers than I. Hope I helped!

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Casting reels wrestle fish out of cover better for sure. However most plastics applications where I'm not using a heavy weight, I go with spinning gear. A 5" senko fishes nicely with a 2/0 hook on casting gear with 12 pound line though.

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[movedhere] Fishing Tackle [move by] five.bass.limit.

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I use both spinning and bait casters for throwing finesse baits. I personally just feel like I have more control over the bait and presentation with my bait caster. Right now it is just a confidence thing.

Later, :)

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I also use both and I find that learning to use both confidently is the key.I use my spinning gear for most anything from1/8oz down to weightless.and bait-casting from1/8 oz up to Whatever my rod will work best with.A good balanced setup on either type will go a long way.I still got a lot of practice to become proficient at light baits on a bait-caster but even if I do get better I love my spinning gear too. ;)So like any way you fish each style is another tool in your tool box,and the right toolcan make alot of difference.

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I have a nice Spinning set up I keep in my rod box with light line but I alwas find myself throwing weightless trick worms/finesse worms on a 6'6" MH rod with a old reen Curado 201 spooled with 10# Yo Zuri. I know I could get a little more distance with the spinning set up but is there any other advantage i'm missing out on? I throw wacky rigged trick worms quite often and prefer not fooling with flipping a bail on a spining reel.I know its popular to use spinning reels for shaky head or finesse fishing in general, just trying to understand the real benefit in spining over casting I guess.

Light baits won 't fly far and easily with 10 lbs test and a MH rod; 6 lb test and a ML-M rod is more likely.

Light baits ( I 'm not speaking about a 5" senko that weights 3/8 oz, any decent baitcaster can cast that )  don 't have enough weight to load the rod, to load the rod you need a lighter powered rod, also 10 + lbs line is quite thick so the bait doesn 't have enough energy to pull it out from the reel and make the spool spin. Reduce the braking and the tension to allow the spool to spin more freely.

Casting light stuff with bc gear even though the reel has a part in it is more about the proper line and the proper powered rod.

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I have a nice Spinning set up I keep in my rod box with light line but I alwas find myself throwing weightless trick worms/finesse worms on a 6'6" MH rod with a old reen Curado 201 spooled with 10# Yo Zuri. I know I could get a little more distance with the spinning set up but is there any other advantage i'm missing out on? I throw wacky rigged trick worms quite often and prefer not fooling with flipping a bail on a spining reel.I know its popular to use spinning reels for shaky head or finesse fishing in general, just trying to understand the real benefit in spining over casting I guess.

Light baits won 't fly far and easily with 10 lbs test and a MH rod; 6 lb test and a ML-M rod is more likely.

Light baits ( I 'm not speaking about a 5" senko that weights 3/8 oz, any decent baitcaster can cast that ) don 't have enough weight to load the rod, to load the rod you need a lighter powered rod, also 10 + lbs line is quite thick so the bait doesn 't have enough energy to pull it out from the reel and make the spool spin. Reduce the braking and the tension to allow the spool to spin more freely.

Casting light stuff with bc gear even though the reel has a part in it is more about the proper line and the proper powered rod.

I guess setting the hook should not be an issue with  a M rod due to the small finesse hook correct? I have never use anything lighter than MH for worm fishing.

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I guess setting the hook should not be an issue with a M rod due to the small finesse hook correct?

Setting the hook on a noodle for rod is an art form in itslef but you got to have develop the correct hook setting technique, the correct bait rigging technique with the right size/width hook and the right drag setting.

You don 't try to "cross their eyes" with a light powered rod you use the backbone of the rod and the fish 's weight to set the hook, when you detect the bite lift the rod as you reel in the slack quickly and maintain the pressure at all times using your rod as a lever, the more the fish pulls, the more it will hook itself. If you try to crosss their eyes the only thing that will happen is that the rod will absorb the shock and the ammount of energy applied to the hook point is reduced greatly because of the shock anrsobing proprties of the rod.

Rigging the bait properly also helps, most anglers are used to hide the hook in the bait to maintain weedlessness, that works great when fishing with heavier gear, but that doesn 't work with lighter gear, why ? because you loose energy that instead of being directed to the hook point and penetrate the mouth is directed to drive the hook through the bait, To solve the problem your riggig should have the least ammount of plastic to go thrugh before it can exit the bait, T-exposing and skin hooking are your best friends for fishing with low powered gear.

Hook width is very important, the wider gauge the less energy you 'll have to drive the hook through the bait and into the fish 's mouth, thinner wire hooks allow you to drive the hook with less energy and that energy is not lost so greatly, it 's easier to drive in a needle than it is to drive a nail. Light gear has not enough power to drive in a super line hook properly.

Hook sharpness is of the outmost importance, razor sharp hooks all the time.

Drag setting is important when fishing with light rods & light lines, you just can 't tighten the drag all the way down because the drag is there to protect both tools, rod and line, drag too tight ---Z the line breaks or the worst case scenario, the rod breaks. So how much drag you need ? depends on both, rod power and line test, but in general terms, how much drag ? as much as you need to make the rod bow and then the drag slips.

If you want to learn how to fish with light gear I suggest you go panfishing, the best practice you can have is panfishing.

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Great post, Raul.  Lots of excellent information.  Going to use some of it myself.  Use to do a lot of ultralight fishing, but never once considered any of the points you made (other than sharp hooks).

On a side note, I once landed a 10 pound carp on 4 lb. test Trilene with the spinning reel's drag locked down.  I was using a 9 foot fiberglass live bait rod tho!   ;D

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I guess setting the hook should not be an issue with a M rod due to the small finesse hook correct?

Setting the hook on a noodle for rod is an art form in itslef but you got to have develop the correct hook setting technique, the correct bait rigging technique with the right size/width hook and the right drag setting.

You don 't try to "cross their eyes" with a light powered rod you use the backbone of the rod and the fish 's weight to set the hook, when you detect the bite lift the rod as you reel in the slack quickly and maintain the pressure at all times using your rod as a lever, the more the fish pulls, the more it will hook itself. If you try to crosss their eyes the only thing that will happen is that the rod will absorb the shock and the ammount of energy applied to the hook point is reduced greatly because of the shock anrsobing proprties of the rod.

Rigging the bait properly also helps, most anglers are used to hide the hook in the bait to maintain weedlessness, that works great when fishing with heavier gear, but that doesn 't work with lighter gear, why ? because you loose energy that instead of being directed to the hook point and penetrate the mouth is directed to drive the hook through the bait, To solve the problem your riggig should have the least ammount of plastic to go thrugh before it can exit the bait, T-exposing and skin hooking are your best friends for fishing with low powered gear.

Hook width is very important, the wider gauge the less energy you 'll have to drive the hook through the bait and into the fish 's mouth, thinner wire hooks allow you to drive the hook with less energy and that energy is not lost so greatly, it 's easier to drive in a needle than it is to drive a nail. Light gear has not enough power to drive in a super line hook properly.

Hook sharpness is of the outmost importance, razor sharp hooks all the time.

Drag setting is important when fishing with light rods & light lines, you just can 't tighten the drag all the way down because the drag is there to protect both tools, rod and line, drag too tight ---Z the line breaks or the worst case scenario, the rod breaks. So how much drag you need ? depends on both, rod power and line test, but in general terms, how much drag ? as much as you need to make the rod bow and then the drag slips.

If you want to learn how to fish with light gear I suggest you go panfishing, the best practice you can have is panfishing.

Thanks Raul, very good info. I actually fish crappie quite often on a 5'6" ML 6# test using tiny tube jigs. I fish club tourneys monthly and it is not uncommon to catch a 4+# on occasions hence the reason I opt for the insurance of 10# on the MH rod. I fish the edges and in pockets of grass beds often and the thought of trying to work a fish out of grass with such light line and rod is what scares me.

However I beleive from what I have absorbed from your advise I will try this. I have 7'M Okuma IM8 rod paired with a small framed Okuma Nemisis casting reel I will spool with 8# xps flouro and give it a whirl. I may even be able to use this set up for occasional deep cranking . Thanks for your help

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Geez, if I can get decent hooksets on a 7'6" Clarus LXF with 4lb fluro..I think anyone could get the same results.. ;D

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Don't understand the fuss.  On Tuesday I spent 8 hours throwing a 3/16 oz. shakey head using a H-XF rod and 50 lb. braid.  My guide was using a H-XF Powell and 15 lb. Big Game.

Rod wasn't even loading and still getting ample casting distance. 

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I guess its one of those whatever works for you deals. I fished with a guide on Lake Fork and for two days we threw weightless wacky rigged finesse worms on MH rods with 17-20 # P-Line CX with Citicas/Curados and distance was decent. The rods definitely did not load but we were able to still put it out there. I guess its a balance between efficiency and reliability.

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I can throw weightless worms with my ML baitcatsing gear, but I sure as heck can't aim it. But if you can, more power to you.

Raul great post, thanks.

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I read that a spinning rod allows a bait to fall vertically where a casting rod will pendulum the bait as it falls.  Its in how the line pays out as the bait falls.  Having to turn a spool on a casting reel it would not be able to do this as well after it hits the water.  You'd have to stay ahead of the bait's sinking rate to strip line from the reel as the bait sinks in order to maintain a vertical decent.  With a spinning reel it's not an issue since no spool is turning as line pays out. 

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Geez, if I can get decent hooksets on a 7'6" Clarus LXF with 4lb fluro..I think anyone could get the same results.. ;D

Oh, no not again! ;D :)

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