Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ima Bass Ninja

7' vs 7'6 rod

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone!! I have been reading here and other places that for deep cranking that a longer rod which would cast farther would be the best choice. If you were to use the same weight lure on a 7' rod vs; a 7'6" rod how much distance would you gain on average and how much deeper would that get the lure? I ask this because currently i use a 7' with some success, but before i spend money on a longer rod i would like some input from those who use them. Also seeing as i have a smaller boat (17'6" nitro) the 7'6" rod would not fit in the locker and would have to be left out on the deck..Thank you!! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 7'MH Lucky Craft Cranking rod and have been using it for over a year and couldn't be happier.  I fish everything for Norman Middle-Ns to Fat Free Shads and DD22s with great success and good distance.  A month ago I didn't think extra length made a difference, until I bought a 7'10''M Carrot Stix Gold on sale at TW.  I am getting atleast 5-10 yards on a lob cast and more on a hard cast.  I have actually spooled my Sol a few times that is filled with 12lb P-Line Floro-clear.  Comparatively, the Carrot Stix action is slower, it has a little less power, and the tip is softer than the LC, and it's not a cranking rod, just a regular F action gold.  It makes a great deep crank rod.  In short, longer is better, and if it's an option for you, it should be considered. 

If it's left out constantly, you'll be prone to thrw it more which is never a bad thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no hard and fast rule as to how much farther a longer rod will cast, but all else being equal, 6" added length will produce a noticeably longer cast. This not only allows deep cranks to reach their potential, but keeps the bait in the strike zone longer. My personal crankin' rod is custom built on a 7'6" Lamiglass blank used on their SR765.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would definetely reccomend the 7'6" for the deep divers, I'm guestimating that it's added 10-15 yards to the cast of some of my favorite deep divers which I throw a lot. As Delaware Valley mentioned your going to get your baits deeper and keep it the strike zone longer, I know my catch rate has went way up since making the switch. I've done well with the 7'6" Bass Pro Crankin' Stick MH which is available in a telescopic model for easy storage in your rod locker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should look at the 7'6" Bass Pro Cranking Stick rods that are telescoping like flippin' sticks like Primus said. I haven't used those particular models, but the ones I have used are great crank rods.

http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_-1_10001_10204844____SearchResults

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You should look at the 7'6" Bass Pro Cranking Stick rods that are telescoping like flippin' sticks like Primus said. I haven't used those particular models, but the ones I have used are great crank rods.

http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_-1_10001_10204844____SearchResults

What does telescoping mean?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

typically it means that the rear portion of the rod handle slides up into the rod so you can make it shorter so it fits in a rod locker.  im looking into a crank rod too... and i may be going with the bps cranking stick with the telescoping handle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a 6'6" graphite rod for small cranks when fishing the bank (for accuracy) but when I want long casts in open water, a 7'6" can drive casts through wind and gives noticeably more distance.  I use a St Croix 7'6" MM saltwater graphite rod for open water and crankbaits up to 3/4 oz.  Fiberglass just isn't for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 7' 11" Shimano Crucial CRC-C711M crankbait rod, it casts cranks unbelievably far.  It's also a great rod for casting heavy surface lures such as wakebaits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

keep in mind that the rod action, tip stiffness and type of bait being thrown also affects distance.

for example, i can toss a 1/4oz crankbait alot further on my 6'6" st croix fast action rod than i can on my 7'1" loomis XF.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think if you throw deep cranks enough then getting a long deep cranking rod would be worth your while. on the other hand...if you don't throw deep cranks alot, then you can surely get by with what you have now. I too have a 7' rod locker, so I have a Kistler Argon 7'9" crankin stick,telescopic, that works great  for me. If you get one, I would get a Telescopic rod around 8' long. The you will be able to launch those 22's a country mile, and get them deep. i think the main thing to consider is how much you will thor wthose deep cranks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A longer rod will not get a crankbait deeper than a short rod unless you do the "kneel and reel" with the tip underwater.  But it will cast farther and your crankbait will therefore run at its maximum depth for a longer distance.  Most guys don't realize that virtually 100% of crankbaits on an 'average cast' of 70 ft are only running at max depth between 30 and 15 ft from the boat.  This is compiled data from hundreds of baits, hundreds of casts over a course measured by an underwater observer ("Precision Casting" by Mark Romanack, 2001).  If you can cast farther, which a long rod will help you do, the max depth portion of the retrieve is correspondingly longer.  A long rod is not magic, but bumping cover for a longer distance will on average get more fish in the boat - however you do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×