Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
leanback24

fishing areas

Recommended Posts

Personally I like fallen trees the best because of the different lures I am able to use.  Spinnerbaits are my favorite to use for falldowns.  Crankbaits can also be very productive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

falldowns are nice to fish.  Personally I like to fish in the grass.  If you can find weeds you can normally find some bass.  I also like to fish rocky points and rock bars

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hey can you tell me where you think is the best place to fish like fallen trees, weeds, docks

asap please

They're all great. Largemouth are cover-oriented and those are three good types of cover. Just experiment on your body of water to establish which one they're most likely to use in that water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

right now, i like fallen trees... during post spawn the bass will sit right under the trees waiting to ambush baitfish... i mean they do that in vegetation and grass and stuff like that... it's just me and bassin4life have caught 2 monsters around fallen timber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your question is very dependent on a long list of variables. The short list is;

water temp.

water clarity

light penetration

oxygen content

water ph level

season

fish activity

water current

Some would say the moon phase

There are thousands and thousands of books and articles written trying to explain and solve the mysteries of this list.  The way I go about it is to fish and keep records of every day I am on the water.

The best place to fish is where the fish are. Take time to learn how to find them and the catching part gets easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fallen Timber, laydowns,grass,rockpiles...points ;D Good Luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although all of these different cover suggestions are valid,I prefer the grass(mainly because we're covered init down here).The fact that the grass produces a higher oxygen content also enters the decision.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where I live and fish there in almost no laydowns so I have to go with vegetation, I just have NOT figured out which holds bass and what don't.  But I am working on it, caught 4 small ones last evening on the outside of the weedline on a crankbait(Bandit) and a bigger one out in the pads on a buzzbait.  So I have not figured out anything  LOL ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Florida, a lot our lakes contain hydrilla grass. Some topped out and some submerged.  That's where I find most of my fish.

2 weeks ago I fished in Lake Okeechobee and found some off-shore hydrilla grass that was holding bass. Everyone else around was flipping into thick matted grass, but me and my partner were making long casts into the open water and were slowing working worms through the hydrilla. And we did very well.

If I can't find any hydrilla, the 2nd thing I look for is moving water. I fish around locks, spillways, canals, etc...

If I can't find any hydrilla or moving water... I look for drop-offs and holes.

If I can't find any hydrilla, moving water, or drop-offs, then I'll fish any cover I can find... exposed grass, docks, whatever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To find the grass, we either see it topped out (which is obvious) or we use the trusty old depth finder. In Lake Okeechobee somebody told us to drive to "the Monkey Box" because it was known that their was hydrilla there. Sure enough, when we pulled up up you could see it topped out. We just fished around the topped out areas and felt for the off-shore stuff.

But if it's too deep to physically see, I'll use the depth finder to see grass and then just drop the anchor to see what kind of grass I pull up.

Honestly, most of the time I already know where the hydrilla is just from experience... ie Lake Conway, West Lake Toho, etc... But in new lakes it can be a challenge finding it.

In Lake Conway, there's so much hydrilla that the trick is actually to find where is stops and fish the edges and drop offs.

I don't think there's much, if any, hydrilla grass in Lake Harris. Which is a shame.  (although I haven't been there in over 2 years so I may be mistaken)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On big water I like to focus on points, preferably primary points that extend into the main channel. I want the boat initially positioned where we can cast into 20+ ft of water, dropping into the deeper channel. I'll begin by fishing into the point, moving out to the windward side and fishing the shoreline for fifty yards or so. If this pattern proves unsuccessful, on to the secondary points and a slight change in strategy.

Secondary points tend to be surrounded by slightly warmer water. Generally the slope of the land is less dramatic and one side is much deeper than the other. I'll approach a secondary point just like a primary, but fish both sides.

I sure don't mind if there are docks or trees or grass around to compliment the rocks, but I'm primarily focused on structure, not cover. And before we stop and fish any of these spots, I want to see fish, preferably some big arcs but balls of bait fish work for me, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×