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michaelnous

Bass Anatomy?

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How do you tell the difference between male and female? Serious I am going to begin stocking my local pond and do not want to populate all males or all females.

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There was an article in Bassmaster a few months ago about stocking ponds.  I hope you have help in how to do it otherwise you will be wasting a lot of time and money and everything will end up dead.

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I've always heard by their eye color.  Light brown is a male, dark brown is a female.  I think.  Maybe somebody else can re-confirm this.

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Thanks guys. I have heard all those but wondering if their is one clear distinction. I have a pond in my subdivision about five years old with underwater plant life and  a thriving population of bluegill but no bass. So I have done research not only on this website but read a few books and transplanted some bass. The pond is a little over an acre in size and up to 15 feet deep depending on how much rain we get. A fountain in the center of it running throughout the summer. I have put 4 bass total between 16 and 22 inches in the pond. I will not be putting anymore in and have pictures on my phone of the ones I have but want to make sure I have at least one or two females. Anybody really now for certain how to tell the difference?

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Look under their skirts ;D

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Here ya go

Practical Field Methods of Sexing Largemouth Bass

G. W. BENZ and R. P. JACOBS

Bureau of Fisheries, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, State Office Building, Hartford, Connecticut 06115, USA

Abstract.Several rapid and simple methods of sexing live mature largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were assessed: the presence or absence of a swollen reddish genital papilla, the shape of the scaleless area surrounding the urogenital opening, and the depth and angle of probe penetration into the urogenital opening. The genital papilla method was 89% successful during the spring, but only 48% successful during the fall. The shape of the urogenital opening was a poor indicator of sex (53% of the fish were sexed correctly). Probing the urogenital opening was the best single method; it provided success rates of 90% (probe depth) and 94% (probe angle). The highest rate of sexing success (98%) was realized during the spring spawning season from a combination of the papilla and probing methods. The probing methods that were used successfully in this study on largemouth bass might be used with similar success in sexing other fish species.

In other words,...forget it, lol

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I know for certain how to tell the difference but I truely doubt that you will be able to learn just like that, it took me a couple hundred of fish to learn how to to differentiate both, females have 3 orifices in the genital papilae, males have 2.

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