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Do you contrast or match plastic to water color

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A few lakes I fished on lately had green water. I am guessing this has something to do with the quickly growing weeds, although it is just that, a guess. Nonetheless, I was curious as to whether you should match the worm color to the water color, or if you should contrast it so it stands out. For example, watermelon in green water to blend in or green pumpkin (or black) to contrast? In muddy water, green pumpkin to blend or dark blue, black or maybe white/silver to contrast?

I theorized that if the fish couldn't see it, they would be less likely to find it and strike it so I opted for the contrast color. Or do I want them to not see it?

From what I read on here, the general concensus is to go darker in overcast or evening skies, which to me would make it even more difficult to see the bait. A black worm in black sky can't be easy for a bass to see , I know I can't see it. If it is the action of the worm that is causing the strikes, why would you go to a darger color when it is getting darker outside. Wouldn't this make it less likely for them to see the action of the worm? Please enlighten me before my head explodes.

A good scientific explanation would be wonderful.

Thanks.

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General rule: dark water - dark bait: clear water - light bait. The theory is based on contrast and the human eyesight. What the bass see is really only assumption since they haven't talked with anyone yet, however this general rule seems to hold up no matter where you are fishing.

Green water = algae bloom: this is common in the warmer months and increased rain fall.

Don't look for too many "real" scientific answers about bass and their behavior. It will ruin your fishing experience for you. There are very few "real" scientific answers out there for this critter. Using your observation skills will do more for you when on the water than anything else. Every time you do catch a fish start asking the "W's". Why, what, where, note the when, and add the how.

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Violate purple in green water. It contrasts the greenness and fish can pick it out better. :o In dark water if I am fishing shallow baits I use baits with metal flake like junebug, black neon, black blue flake. In deeper water where I know sun penetration is low I use solid dark colors or two tone like black and blue or black and chartreuse tails. Overcast skies in clear water I use light colors like pumpkin seed or redshad with the worm turned over so that the red is on the back. Overcast skies in dark water I still use dark worms. If I am fishing in cover weeds or wood I use colors or metal flake worms that contrast the cover. I like redshad green flake, junebug, black blue flake for cover. I use the flake to help my bait stand out from the cover.  

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There are several factors used to select worm color. One relied on is Matching the hatch or trying to match the colors of the baits to the colors of the forage that the bass are feeding on. Anouther is like you are talking about and matching the surroundings if that doen't work try to get noticed and use a contrasting color.

In stained water I think most of the natural colors work well or what I call the pooh colored, if pooh turns that color it should catch fish. I like Watermelon, pumpkin, alot of the smokes and shad colors, browns, dark greens and blue with blk flk is a good color in stained water or a mixture of one or more. I probably try to match to the vegitation, structure or surface I am fishing against more more than water color. As far a contrast you can try useing baits with flakes or yellow and bubblegum, and I read on here the other night that white shows up well on the bottom at night. Here are some links to past posts to look though, since everybody is fishing now, some weekends look a little slow in getting new responses, sometimes.

http://bassresource.com/cgi-bin/bass_fish/YaBB.pl?board=Fishing_Tackle_ID;action=display;num=1117738960

http://bassresource.com/cgi-bin/bass_fish/YaBB.pl?board=Fishing_Tackle_ID;action=display;num=1118795523

http://bassresource.com/cgi-bin/bass_fish/YaBB.pl?board=gen_bass;action=display;num=1117771103

http://bassresource.com/beginner/color_fishing.html

http://bassresource.com/beginner/Choosing_Colors_selection.html

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I would agree with much above.

If you can 'match the hatch', I believe this is good in theory - but it seems to be more relevant in cranks and spinnerbait blades in my experience.

There is much truth in my opinion to using more natural colors (greens, watermelons, pumpkins, browns) in clearer water.  As well, as mentioned above, it seems the more tinted/dingy the water, the darker the plastic or jig.

BUT, some fish in some specific waters like a certain color bait/presentation, no matter what.  Written above are general statements.  There is a specific lake 'back home' in which a chartreuse finesse worm is usually the ticket.  That particular worm on other lakes is average at best wherever else I have used it, but at this particular lake (in which my friends and I actually call it the "lake X worm") it produces year round even when it doesn't make the 'general' color of use sense.  I have yet to find a chartreuse worm/craw or baitfish in this lake.

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I use this as a rule of thumb:

Clear water-natural colors

Stained water-add something bright like chartreuse

Muddy water-depends on the light.  Bright colors when it is sunny, but if it is cloudy or low light I use darker colors.  

There are a lot of theories to what color when, but this has proved to be consistant for me.

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ball_coach_1,

Isn't it interesting that some lakes really are color specific? I generally believe that the profile and action of the various soft platics is far more important than color. That being said, I almost always use dark colors, but on certain lakes specific colors have proven to be consistantly more productive.

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