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airborne_angler

How does a Jig Bite Feel?

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I have heard that a "jig bite" feels a certain way. I wanna go out this week and try the Drop shot/Jig technique . I will be using a 3/16 Green Pumpkin FLW Finesse jig with the Craw trailer thats provided with the jig. As I have been told the dropshot bait is what needs to be focused/concentrated on with this rig,but should a fish decide to hit the jig,just how does that feel? Ive never fished a jig so I dont know what to expect.

I will be using a 6' Spinning rod with a Shimano reel and 6lb test line(I would use heavier line but the reel will only hold 4 and 6 lb test). Im sure this will be adequate unless I get hit by a Hawg/or 2 seein how this is a double rig setup.

What other things can you seasoned fisherman tell me about fishing with jigs that would give me the upper hand?

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Bass do not strike hard when taking a jig.  They inhale it.

To detect the almost imperceptible bump or tap of a lightly biting fish you have to rely on the sensivity of your rod tip.

Reeling in a jig will destroy that sensitivity and you will not be able to detect strikes.  Use the flipping or pitching technique and let the jib float to the bottom along the shore or in the lily pads.

Try to use a optically brightened line that appears above the surface.  Many times the strike is so light that even a highly sensitive rod tip cannot detect it.  But you can see your line move in the water or see a twitch, jump, quiver or the line moves sideways.

Keep your rod tip moving up and down to work the jig from Noon to about 10 o'clock.  Use only the rod top to move the jig.  Set the hook if you think you have a strike.  You will be wrong more than you are right but being right only once is worth all the effort.

Add a plastic trailer when the water temperature is over 80 and a pork trailer when the temperature is below 80.

You want the jig to represent a crawfish.

Good luck.

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the "jig" is such a mystical thing to most fishermen, but its really not a lot different than soft plastics, in fact very similiar, you just have a lot less time to detect the bite and then set the hook.

The actual bite varies just as much as it does on a soft plastic from a pretty hard thump to a tiny tick...just watch the line.  The jig bite is not so sensitive that its incapable of being felt.  Bass will aggressively attack crawfish, trying to catch them before they can scoot away and will attack a jig in the same way.  Don't psyche yourself out over a jig...its not a difficult thing to fish.  Trust in your equipment and be in tune..you'll catch fish on a jig.  Feel for weight, mushiness when you pull, and then set the hook....you'll do fine.

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KD28,that is exactly how I feel about it.

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Bites on a jig vary from a sharp "thump" to a slight "tick" that you should feel in your rod handle. Sometimes your line will just start moving out to the side or will come right at you(this usually indicates a quality fish). Believe it or not, clear line enables me to see the line much better and I use it for all worm'n and jig'n. Most bites on the jig can be felt so don't worry about it. There are subtle bites that can be missed by our sense of touch so keep an eye on your line. It will jump and indicate a bite. Also there are times when you will go to lift the jig after it touches down on the bottom and you will feel the fish tugging. I believe that you need a quick hookset when jig fishing but I don't go for that bionic eye crossing hookset that you so commonly see. I find that I need to generate speed in the rod tip more than power to really stick the fish good. Less power/more speed will be easier on your joints and lower back in the long run.

Tecniques I like with the pig and jig

#1-lift and drop(pitching and flipping)

#2-swimming(pump the bait gently while swimming it around cover or current)

#3-vertical jigging(just like a spoon)

#4-yo-yo(steep banks, bluffs, etc...)

GOOD LUCK the jig is an awesome bait and I wish you much success with it.

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Guest JoshKeller

I usually try and let my jigs sink on a semi slack line, so either a bump, or it will feel mushy when you lift it. If you feel anything different, set the hook.

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There's some excellent feedback here to get you started no doubt. I agree that this bait is not mystical in any way. The best teacher for me with the jig is experience and practice. After a while of catching bass on this lure, eventually it will become second nature to you, I promise. Every day is different. Some days they'll smack the bait pretty good, and other days, ya really have to watch your line closely for those more subtle strikes as mentioned above. Yesterday they were smacking it hard, and I pulled in a couple of 4 pounders caught near wood only 3 feet down.

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AZ,

So far this year I had been mainly fishing softplastics, t-rigged with and without weight.  Jig fishing is something I have rarley done, so just this last saturday, I decided to try jig fishing. I put on a 3/8 ounce black blue jig with a black chunk trailer and within about 90 minutes boated 2 bass and lost one.  The feel was not much different than that of a weighted softplastic and the bites felt very similar as well.  The big differences were the fall rate and degree of weedlessness.  A Jig, in most cases falls faster than t-rigged plastics.  By adding a trailer you can slow the fall rate a little  Be ready to spend a little time pulling weeds off or getting use to keeping the jig just above the weedline.  Anyway,  I didn't notice the bite that different.  Just go give it a go and tell us what your experience is.  Good luck.

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Since you are drop-shotting this jig, most of your bites will probably be characterized by a light thump from a bass slowly picking up the bait. However, sometimes a bass will grab it and swim off with it, in this case the bait will just get heavier and you will see your line moving. So if you feel anything different set the hook. Good luck.

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Your focus is in the wrong area.

You need to no what your jig feels like.

When it doesn't feel like a 1/2 oz jig or a 1/8 thats a fish.

This is the same with every bait Spinner bugs, jerks, dropshot, slugs.t-rigs,crigs.

So learn your baits and set the hook oftened.

Garnet

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This is great info guys. I STILL haven't caught one on a jig, but I know I will sooner or later. I've even got a favorite jig already even though I haven't caught one because I'm confident I will. I had two strikes on my Picasso jig this morning. Ultimately, my 3 bass came off a chatterbait and a finesse worm. Oddly enough, one of the bass caught on the chatterbait was the same four pounder I caught on the Blade Dancer around 3 or 4 weeks ago. Same snelled hook buried in the top of his mouth, same ball of line down his throat. I high fived him and said "Seeya......" ::)

Prog

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Guest bigtex

I have found only one way of explaining how you will know when a bass bites your soft plastic and JIGS. I compare it to having kids around the house, I only have one. Now I know that there will be some kids reading this and can't really relate to what I'm saying but I do believe that the quality of kids on here can read between the lines and will pick up on what I am saying.

Type of bite---how it feels when you get the bite

     

"1.) Hard bite---when your child runs head on into you for one of those "I miss you hugs."

2.) Light bite---when your child hangs onto your shirt and you know he/she is there just by the small

                  tugs.

3.) Silent bite--when you don't feel your child tugging on your shirt but when you turn around to walk

                  you step all over them."

By-- Jack McNutt--My grandfather

I use this all the time and it has been passed down to me by my grandfather before he was called to Heaven. I hope this helps you and keep us posted on your fishing trips.

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I have had jigs bite hard, soft, and have had a fish on without feeling a bite at all.  Many times, the bass will bite the jig as its falling.  You may not feel it at all, so you have to watch your line for a twitch.  When pulling it through weeds, you may get  a mushy feeling..swing away!  I usaully get the harder bites when I crawl it along the bottom or right after the jig has hit something hard like a stump.

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I fish a Jig about 70% of the time

much Great advice above....

Maybe before you go drop shotting with the jig,

Just tie on a jig and fish  the jig alone for a solid week, force yourself to fish it  100% of the time

you will then have your answer...

MY theory is force yourself to learn a bait by only going out and fishing that said bait for at least 4 to 6 trips.

( then again i have had to do this for the past 5 years while i was doing lure reviews  :))

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I agree with everyone and some great answers but I think for someone asking "what it feels like",..I think Dwhite hit somthing big.

All these answers came from guys who "toughed it out". The jig when first approached , can be intimidating but with time, close attention and lots of chucking will give you the confidence that drives all these great answers.

Point #1 when taking up jigging is to NOT GIVE UP. In an instance,....1 fish even,...your world can change. That 1 bite sometimes puts all those little things together and nopw you know

what to expect

what to do

what to look for

etc.

To reiterate on Sam's point, it's not that reeling in a jig won't work,reeling a jig can also be quite productive but that's not what you are looking to do yet(I'm pretty sure this is what Sam means).  Reeling in a jig will give you a different feel than the one you wqant to learn first.

Learn the jig on the bottom with shaking motions, hopping motions or even deadsticking and then when you are comfortable there, you can learn swimming and dragging a jig,....but those come later.

*Key point-90% or so of the bites come on the initial fall uaually when close to the bottom.

Good luck and get a good grip on that rod,...you'll need it!

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