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Del from philly

How many fish can you bring in in one spot???

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Questuion.....

when you start catching fish, lets say bass over a lb or 2....do you keep fishing that same exact spot???

sometimes i move on because I feel like i made a scene.....but yesterday I stayed and caught 3 more in almost the exact same spot.....

how does this work? i always assumed after I bring in one that tryed to juimp and everything that the spot would be ruined......this isnt always true is it???

thanks....

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If they biting I aint moving, once caught 17 back to back off the same tree  ;)

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Me a friend of mine caught, believe it or not, about 75 bass in a small creek that had very high water level after some hard rain! We caught all the fish right at the mouth of the creek. The water was very stained so we couldn't see the fish but we caught one on almost every cast! I hadn't rained for about 4 months and I believe most of fish in the lake were at this creek to feed. This was in pre-spawn and we caught fish on everything we threw at them. This probably happens only once in a lifetime!

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Past three experiences I can recall from this summer:

1) Caught two off the same lay down at Lake Accotink

2) Caught three off the same dock, same pillar actually at the Occoquan River (hours apart though)

3) Caught two off the same wooden boat launch by tossing a worm directly under it again at the Occoquan River.

I know there were a few other places I've caught some from the same spot. But yea I normally stay a while and really work it to see if it was an isolated bass (unlikely) or a schooling bass. Where there is one, there normally is more close by. They are all looking for the same thing, cover and forage.

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i pulled two nice fish off the end of a concrete retaining wall the other day...pitched the jig, hit the wall, let it fall...two identical pitches and two fish...then i went to the other end of the wall and caught two more!

Cliff

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Guest btlva

A couple years ago I was able to fish a certain lake for 7 consecutive days, and each and every day I could pull up to the same 2 spots-each no bigger than a volkswagen-and catch 5-8 bass on a jerkbait. I also had a spot on the same lake that produced 17 bass in 20 casts one evening but for whatever reason I couldn't get a bite there again. The water there was crystal clear and the bass didn't get spooked by hooked fish at all, even had a couple doubles on a Rogue. These were all staging prespawn largemouth in the 1-4lb range and I had a blast catching them! The bigger females were a little harder to find.

There's one shallow, flat-bottomed lake I fish 3 or 4 times a year where there is only one spot worth spending any time. I will camp out on that spot for an entire day, buzzing the fish with a rat-l-trap until I can get a reaction strike. I fish this spot any time of year...I even caught some Rat-l-trap fish there last January. There are multiple fish there at all times, simply because it is by far the best structure in the lake! Often I'll catch 1 or 2 fish in my first 10 casts and then won't get bit again for 45 mins, then I'll catch 3 more, then no bites for 30mins, then get a couple more, etc, etc. Easy fishing and alot of fun!

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I was thinking the same thing. Do fish sense danger? If they see one of their buddies getting yanked out of the water are they more cautious?

Reading everyone's post I guess not.

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I have hear Rick Clunn say that fish emit some kind of enzyme of something when they are fighting the hook, this can get the bass stirred up initially and cause a "feeding frenzy" but this can also quickly die out if it keeps up.  The solution is to either hold the fish in the live well until they can be released in an area away from that spot or let it settle down before hitting it again.

In answer to the question, "How many fish can you bring in in one spot?" -- depends on how many fish there are in that spot.

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This thread picks up from time to time and I ussually add my two cents, I will go ahead and make it an even dollar.

Question: How many fish can you bring in in one spot???

Answer: Depends

Now i know that sounds sketchy but it is the truth. Now we all know that there are enviromental factors that can make or break a fishing trip, like barometric pressure, cold fronts and rapidly rising water levels. So lets say that everthing is stable and go into how to catch more fish in a single spot.

First carefully pick your spot. Look for areas with cover and access to deep water. Another plus might be somewhere with new water coming in. Because we all know not every spot is as good as the next. So lets say you have a good spot on a stable day. Do you pull up to the are and begin by casting in the middle and hitting the sweet spots before moving on? If thats the case you passed by two thirds of the fish in the area. Thats right two thirds. The reason is that when you catch a fish it emitts a stress hormone that puts a feeding school down. This is why when you release a fish it seems that its over. Now here are a few tricks to help you catch more and bigger fish in each area.

First things first, fish the outside edges first then work inward. Use reaction baits at this point. The reason is that the most active fish in the school are on the outside edges and suspended away from the cover. Good baits for this are spinners, cranks, and curly tail grubs on a mushroom head. At this point you have to decide what presentation works best, horizontal or vertical. This will give you a feel for the rest of the day. Seeing what the most active fish are biting on save you massive amounts of time. This is the best place on the cover to experiment.

Second move into the cover to just inside the cover, still not the heart. Here i like a 6 inch texas rig worm, fat rap or colorado bladed spinner. These allow me to work over and through the cover and react to the cover. I like to work slow because this area holds fish that are less active so, I like to go with the smallest weight possible taking depth and current into consideration. This helps to keep me in the strike zone the longest and allows for the most action.

Fianlly we start to move in, still keep in mind that this is where the most inactive bass are hanging out, also this is where the largest hang out. So I like to use a larger bait with a larger weight. Not really flipping because I might try to let that bait hit the bottom and sit for a while. But still work it slowly. After I ttake a fish on that I like to take like a 10 inch dead ringer with like a three eights weight. If the water is deep or the weeds thick I might go upwards three quartes of an ounce.

Working cover like this can help you take large numbers and even larger fish in the same spots you had only caught one or two.

Take it easy,

Peter

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I have hear Rick Clunn say that fish emit some kind of enzyme of something when they are fighting the hook, this can get the bass stirred up initially and cause a "feeding frenzy" but this can also quickly die out if it keeps up. The solution is to either hold the fish in the live well until they can be released in an area away from that spot or let it settle down before hitting it again.

In answer to the question, "How many fish can you bring in in one spot?" -- depends on how many fish there are in that spot.

..........and if they bite. ;)

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GREAT STUFF

THANKS FOR ALL THE GREAST ANSWERS....

it has to not matter based on yesterday, and even a few months ago i got 3 in the same spot.....

all this time i have been usually moving down a little after each catch, just assuming that I played out my stay......guess not

THANKS AGAIN

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This is probably one the most often discussed issues in my local bass club - I have fished as a non-boater for the last several years and have experienced more than my fair share of instances where I would catch a fish on a particular spot and, after measuring it, writing it down on my points card and picking my rod back up, I find that we are anywhere from 100 yds to a 1/4 mile (maybe exagerated) beyond that spot.  I have also seen guys move off of a spot and somebody fishing behind them move in a start picking up fish.

For me the question is not so much how many can I catch, but how long will they keep biting once they start.  Rule of thumb (especially in a tournament):  Never leave fish biting.

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Good question. Lots of tournament fisherman have made a good living catching bass behind another tournament angler who left the bass after catching one. The thinking that the bass are spooked is uaually not the issue. There will always be at least one bass that is more agressive then the others and you catch that fish first, on a reaction bite. The bigger bass, more than likely if you caught a smaller fish, have already moved a little deeper when you caught that first bass.

Try fishing over your shoulder a little deeper and a lot slower and your success rate should improve. The biggest mistake most fisherman make is leaving active bass that are feeding to move onto greener pastures and focusing their efforts toward the shoreline.

WRB

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