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HAMMER23

scientific feeding habits about large bass you must know

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In 1989 I was fishing t-bend at night, I noticed a boat coming toward me down the bank that was very lit up, once they passed me I noticed they were bringing bass to the top of the water with two long rods that had leads extending into the water. As it turned out Texas A&M was doing a study on only bass that exceeded 8lb plus bass. They were radio tagging these bass and studying the travel and feeding patterns of just big bass. After talking to them for a while they said every large bass had two things in common, in the day time they would always suspend in the 13 to 30 ft water column but at night they would follow bass feeding along the bank as fast as there trolling motor would keep up and travel almost two miles of bank doing so. I guess that proves giant bass are big because they do have an aggressive appitite. They also said toledo bend consistantly brought up the larger bass overall. according to them they shocked up two bass out of the same cove that would have taken the state record both times, unfortunately they would not divulge that information. Anyway just something to think about.

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Would like to see results of this study.

   TP&W has said, "shocking double digit bass is a rareity".     In all the years, I believe only one bass in the teens has been shocked to the surface.

    Saying two over 18 lbs would be hard to believe.     Reason being, inorder to get a fish of that size would require more shock, and that could be lethal as per TP&W to smaller fish.

      There was a study with publlshed results from Sam Rayburn.     That study would confirm that these big fish tagged and studied did in fact live offshore in deeper waters during the day and parallel the shore feeding at night and retreated to the depth before morning.

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Would like to see results of this study.

TP&W has said, "shocking double digit bass is a rareity". In all the years, I believe only one bass in the teens has been shocked to the surface.

Saying two over 18 lbs would be hard to believe. Reason being, inorder to get a fish of that size would require more shock, and that could be lethal as per TP&W to smaller fish.

      There was a study with publlshed results from Sam Rayburn. That study would confirm that these big fish tagged and studied did in fact live offshore in deeper waters during the day and parallel the shore feeding at night and retreated to the depth before morning.

             This is hammer23, I am having to borrow my co-workers(bigtimfish), computer at this moment, I Would to try to research those study's to see if there is any validity to it. I agree with the bass's movements and feeding habits but at the age of 18 I took there word to be gospel on what the brought up. Remember this was around 1989 but I will research it and see what I can dig up if the data is there I will find it and get back with you.

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Toledo Bend in a border lake between Texas and Louisiana, maybe they met LA instead of Texas.

Agree with the assessment that big bass move up shallow at night and roam, not just shoreline, but any shallow water zone near deep water access.

Big bass moving deeper in main lake areas is also a fact I agree with.

The big bass move deeper after the post spawn and stay deep until the next pre spawn period, unless hunting for prey.

How deep depends on the lake classification, thermocline level, good DO levels and available deeper prey.

WRB

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WRB,   the tagged big bass study on Rayburn confirmed the same.

It was noted that the tagged bass when hunting at night paralleled the shoreline out in 4-8 ft of water.

    Author noted that she rarely got any shallower than 4 feet to seek prey.

   I was just assuming that a Texas college did the study, thus Texas standards when talking records, but even 16 lbers would be rare to shock up for La standards.  I know the study on Rayburn is on the net somewhere.

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WRB, the tagged big bass study on Rayburn confirmed the same.

It was noted that the tagged bass when hunting at night paralleled the shoreline out in 4-8 ft of water.

Author noted that she rarely got any shallower than 4 feet to seek prey.

I was just assuming that a Texas college did the study, thus Texas standards when talking records, but even 16 lbers would be rare to shock up for La standards. I know the study on Rayburn is on the net somewhere.

back in the late 80's,  Fork had FLMB strain in Texas as I remember Teledo Bend  Rayburn didn't. The kids more than likely shocked up a few 11 to 12 lb bass at night and thought they were records.

The FLMB act the same in CA, love deep water sanctuary's and move up at night to feed. The big bass may cruise a little deeper, then rush prey towards to bank to trap it. Agree the 4' to 8' depth zone is best at night for big bass. The big bass also cruise during day light hours, except deeper; 35' to 15' and push prey against structure or the surface to capture it.

WRB

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It was noted that the tagged bass when hunting at night paralleled the shoreline out in 4-8 ft of water.

Author noted that she rarely got any shallower than 4 feet to seek prey.

quote]

how would those numbers translate over to spotted bass? would it be pretty much the same just abit deeper? the lake i usually fish on holds mostly spots

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I went on a DFG shocking trip on lake Skinner last year. We shocked up probabaly 500 bass and many other fish. We weighed one 13lber and a couple of 10's. The biologist told me they rarley get any monsters and he didnt belive any of the stories of rumored records by other states shocking. Matt Fly you do have 1 detail backwards. the larger fish absorb more electricity and get shocked much harder then the smaller fish using the same amount of current. The big ones looked almost dead while shad were unefected right under the booms. most bluegill just darted away, only the very biggest gills would get shocked hard enough to scoop up but it only lasted a few seconds. The big bass, catfish, carp looked like they were stiff and dead when they got shocked. Aslo the shock boats have to go shallow, they only have about a 10-12ft range. It was definatley interesting and fun. I recomend going with the state fish and game guysif you ever get the chance. I would imagine if you emailed them and asked if you could volentier you would have a good chance of going. It is work though.

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http://www.bassresource.com/fishing/hope_chronicles.html

This is but a small synopsis of the entire John Hope study of large bass that was originally posted in "In-Fishermen" magazine in the late 80's.

The entire book, "Trackin Trophies" is still available.

A few things I remember.

Big bass fall into 2 groups, those that spend their entire time in shallow water and the majority that spend their time in deep water.

Those deep water big bass make a home very close to where they were spawned from.  They return to the same place to spawn each season.

They have specific feeding times.  When feeding they cruise the shoreline at about 6-8 feet and look for feeding opportunities. They are very vulnerable to being caught during these times.  Non-feeding times finds them on a point, usually, suspended and nearly un-catchable.  They use this same homebase all year.

They are territorial.  Boundaries are defined if 2 giant bass are using the same area.  The fish during feeding will swim to the end of it's boundary, turn around and go back.

Lot's of very interesting stuff.  I cut the article out of the magazine but still can't find it.  He gave names to all the fish.  Interesting stuff.

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FYI the earliest FLMB stocking records I show for Toledo Bend are

1980: 294,000

1982: 248,000

1984: 1,379,000

1986: 1,114,000

1988: 987,277

These stockings were from Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and the Sabine River Authority alone.

As mattlures mentioned the study is limited to 10-12' depth range which is why I put little stock in such studies since it leaves out the entire main lake.

I'm looking for the Toledo Bend record from back in '89 which I believe was not that big ;)

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FYI the earliest FLMB stocking records I show for Toledo Bend are

1980: 294,000

1982: 248,000

1984: 1,379,000

1986: 1,114,000

1988: 987,277

These stockings were from Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and the Sabine River Authority alone.

As mattlures mentioned the study is limited to 10-12' depth range which is why I put little stock in such studies since it leaves out the entire main lake.

I'm looking for the Toledo Bend record from back in '89 which I believe was not that big ;)

   I am sure you are correct, like I said at 18 yrs old when a university tells us what the brought up I wasnt one to disagree, but it did give me something to research. Thanks for the info guys !!!

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Good info, didn't know that LA was stocking FLMB back in the early 80's, or just forgot.

CA DFG shocked up a 17 lb bass in lake Perris, the bass was caught a few weeks later in the same cove. Keep in mind that SoCal lakes are tiny, less than 3,000 acres, a creek arm in most Texas lakes. Northern CA has larger lakes and the Delta area where the bass populations can spread out over a vast area.

Perris was the lake that held the world record spotted bass (Alabama spot), today Spots are rare or gone at Perris.

This brings up another factor about bass, spotted bass also have 2 strains; Northern spotted bass and Alabama spotted bass. The Alabama strain grows to over 10 lbs; 10.27 world record from Pine Flat CA. The Northern or Kentucky spotted bass is much smaller, less than 5 lbs. Bass are bass, but very different when it comes to various strains of the same species.

The thought that a northern strain LMB can exceed 17 lbs isn't based on facts. For example the CA state record LMB before FLMB were introduced back in 1959, the record was 14.7 lbs. FLMB is the same lakes grow to 18 lbs. FLMB are a very different bass that look very similar to NLMB, but prefer different prey and deeper water sanctuary's , when available. NLMB are far more aggressive, easier to catch than the FLMB transplanted into deep reservoirs.

WRB

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2005 Survey Report Toledo Bend Reservoir Inland Fisheries Division District 3-D, Jasper, Texas

Florida largemouth bass have been stocked annually since 1984 in an effort to obtain > 20% pure Florida largemouth bass in the population.

Stock Florida largemouth bass (FLMB) annually (100 fingerlings/acre) in 5,000-acre embayment until FLMB genotypes constitute > 20% of the population within embayment.

Largemouth bass stocked: FLMB = Florida largemouth bass, NLMB = Northern largemouth bass, F1 = first generation hybrid between a FLMB and a NLMB, Fx = second or higher generation hybrid between a FLMB and a NLMB.

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Catt, you have a well established population of giant bass similar to Fork, Falcon and Amistad at Toledo Bend by now. What is the current TB record?

WRB

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