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snapshotmd

Whippy Or Backbone For Cranks

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Since I lost a bunch of bass on bad treble hooks, I’ve been doing a lot of research. I found out that Rick Clunn uses a heavy power rod for cranking. His reasoning was along the lines of not having hook setting power with a whippy fiberglass rod. This makes sense. The idea behind a whippy rod is to allow flex so that the bass don’t rip the treble hooks out. But that is because the hooks weren’t set properly in the first place, with the barb not buried. Furthermore, if the crankbait had good trebles to begin with, there is more chance the hook would stick and bury the barb. This minimizes a “shallow” hook set where the bass is barely hooked.

I believe that a whippy rod is good for stock (bad) trebles. If good trebles are used on the crank then a good sweeping hook set on a rod with backbone is the ticket.

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Since I lost a bunch of bass on bad treble hooks, I’ve been doing a lot of research. I found out that Rick Clunn uses a heavy power rod for cranking. His reasoning was along the lines of not having hook setting power with a whippy fiberglass rod. This makes sense. The idea behind a whippy rod is to allow flex so that the bass don’t rip the treble hooks out. But that is because the hooks weren’t set properly in the first place, with the barb not buried. Furthermore, if the crankbait had good trebles to begin with, there is more chance the hook would stick and bury the barb. This minimizes a “shallow” hook set where the bass is barely hooked.

I believe that a whippy rod is good for stock (bad) trebles. If good trebles are used on the crank then a good sweeping hook set on a rod with backbone is the ticket.

We all do what we think is best for differant techniques. B)

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Hmmm...I'm not quite sure about your theory. If you have sharp hooks, a whippy or stout rod should be able to bury the hooks past the barb. If I knew I was going to use dull hooks, then I would want a stiff rod to be able to bury them home. With that being said, I like the best of both worlds, which is why I like Moderate-Fast action rods for treble hooked lures. I feel that action gives me the ability to set the hooks, but also has enough give to not allow the fish to throw the hooks when close to the boat.

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Hmmm...I'm not quite sure about your theory. If you have sharp hooks, a whippy or stout rod should be able to bury the hooks past the barb. If I knew I was going to use dull hooks, then I would want a stiff rod to be able to bury them home. With that being said, I like the best of both worlds, which is why I like Moderate-Fast action rods for treble hooked lures. I feel that action gives me the ability to set the hooks, but also has enough give to not allow the fish to throw the hooks when close to the boat.

I agree that if the hooks are sharp either rod should be sufficient, however the whippy rod probably would not bury the barb as deep. In theory, a stiff rod would work on a dulled regular hook, but I think that a dull treble hook would not work with anything. What I found is treble hooks tend to rotate away from any pressure put on the point. If the point is not sharp enough to catch the surface, then it will merely slip and slide. What I meant by good hooks are hooks that are tempered to hold a sharp point, are resistant to bending, and/or have a geometric advantage, i.e. Extra wide Gap/triple grip, Sure Set, etc. With these hooks, I think a stiffer rod would be better to ensure a good hook set.

I've noticed that I was boating fish on a brand new crankbait. After catching about 4 or 5, I started to lose every fish that hit the crankbait. I think the stock hooks were so cheap that the points dulled after a couple fish. I'd put these in a "single use" category.

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Both the Avid AVC70MM and AVCMHM I use are moderate action, but have plenty of backbone. I've even used the former for pike and steelhead fishing. Slower action doesn't really mean whippy and no backbone. You're thinking of power.

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Ive also seen where Rick said he used that rod cause he likes to use the same type rod for every bait. He said its cause you get to know how baits feel with say a medium heavy fast tip rod. Then if you pull out the whippy one for a different bait you wont know what your feeling cause its totally different from the medium heavy rod. Sounded like more of a consistancy thing.

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I don't get that. Get to know your tools, and you'll know what you're feeling.

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I like moderate action rods for all cranks baits/jerk baits. They give me better hook sets without pulling the bait away prematurely. Moderate action rods help keep the fish pinned until landing because they absorb more shock from a hard fighting fish. I use light power, medium power & medium heavy power all with moderate action. Works for me.Addressing the stock hook issue is another answer. If the stock hooks are not super sharp either sharpen them or replace them. My life is too short not to use sticky sharp hooks.

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For shallow lipped crankbaits I prefer a medium rod with fast to moderatly fast tip. I just find I miss less hooksets with it. On my medium depth cranks and rattle traps I prefer a medium heavy rod. The extra backbone seems to help me get a better hook set, for the slightly deeper fish. This is just what works for me though. Like Grey Wolf stated earlier, everyone fishes differently.

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What rod action would you use fishing cranks with barbless hooks?

oe

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What rod action would you use fishing cranks with barbless hooks?

oe

The same that you would use for barbed hooks. :)

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The same that you would use for barbed hooks. :)

or slightly slower as the barbless treble penetrates more easily than a barbed treble when the rod loads and playing a barbless crank often is enhanced with a softer (slower) action.

oe

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What rod action would you use fishing cranks with barbless hooks?

oe

or slightly slower as the barbless treble penetrates more easily than a barbed treble when the rod loads and playing a barbless crank often is enhanced with a softer (slower) action.

oe

You answered your own question?

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LOL, it isn't that much of a difference that you'd need to change rods when using barbless. I have gone to barbless for a few baits as an experiment (fun fishing only) and while on paper it may seem to matter, it doesn't on the water.

Also, whoever said they like faster rods for shallow divers and lipless cranks, I agree there, too. Especially for ripping through grass. I do prefer a slower action for lipless in rocks. I feel like I get better deflection. Who knows if that's true.

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I have a Powell 703CB Glass rod that I love for ripping traps with. It has plenty of backbone to rip them through grass, but it is slow enough for if a bass hits when I am ripping the trap, the rod will give way so I dont rip the bait out of the fish also. I aint saying its right, but it works for me. For normal cranking I use a Carbonlite M/M and it does a great job. The graphite is much more sensitive than the glass rod and it still has a moderate tip to give way to a surging fish. I can even feel a bass suck a crank in its mouth vs. hitting it from the side on that rod!

Squarebills...now thats a whole nother story. I like a MH/F rod to bring them suckers out of the thick stuff!

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Since I lost a bunch of bass on bad treble hooks, I’ve been doing a lot of research. I found out that Rick Clunn uses a heavy power rod for cranking. His reasoning was along the lines of not having hook setting power with a whippy fiberglass rod. This makes sense. The idea behind a whippy rod is to allow flex so that the bass don’t rip the treble hooks out. But that is because the hooks weren’t set properly in the first place, with the barb not buried. Furthermore, if the crankbait had good trebles to begin with, there is more chance the hook would stick and bury the barb. This minimizes a “shallow” hook set where the bass is barely hooked.

I believe that a whippy rod is good for stock (bad) trebles. If good trebles are used on the crank then a good sweeping hook set on a rod with backbone is the ticket.

First off, who says "whippy" rods don't have backbone? If the rod has power in the butt section, it's going to drive the hooks home no matter what.

It doesn't boil down to rods in terms of hookset as much as it boils down to having decent hooks. If you fish a bait with crap hooks, you're going to have a harder time pinning fish, and keeping them pinned, regardless of the rod you use.

Lastly, Rick uses a Heavy power with a moderate fast action. Unless he's done a complete 180° turn, he's always said that he prefers the rod to have some protection for the hooks, his only variance from that is in a square bill rod, he prefers a fast.

But like someone else said, that's why we have this thing called choice.

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LOL, it isn't that much of a difference that you'd need to change rods when using barbless. I have gone to barbless for a few baits as an experiment (fun fishing only) and while on paper it may seem to matter, it doesn't on the water.

John... no rod change necessary as all of my hooks/trebles are barbless. A softer action aids a deeper bend in the rod which helps keep a flying smallie buttoned. I appreciate the action even more fishing from my float tube and canoe where my mobility is more limited than it is from my boat. I'll have to yield to your experience catching bass on paper as all of mine have been caught in the water.

oe

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Softer power....action is the speed of the taper. A slower taper means more of the rod bends with pressure. It doesn't mean that it takes less force to bend it. That's where the power rating of the rod comes in. ;)

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John... rod ratings are, at best, approximate descriptions. Language varies by both geography and generation. I think I'd enjoy the experience of an afternoon on the water with you. I wish a good day to you Sir.

oe

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No problem OE. I have enough rods from a single line (12 or so Avids) to understand each rating as it relates to another.

But yeah, one company's "extra fast" may be another's "fast," and I know my MH Avids are almost as powerful as many rods labeled H.

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Avid AVC70MHM is my favorite cranking rod by far... I used it for everything crank related.

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