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I'm thinking of buying a boat that has a 2003 225X (PROMAX) motor on it. Any of you all ever had any expirience with these motors or ever heard anything about them? Thanks!

You must be considering one of the "go fast" boats (Bullet, Allison, etc). Those motors can turn very high rpms, require high test gasoline, and may require you wear a flack jacket to protect you from flying engine parts when they explode.

They are quite noisy as compared to the non-racing engine models.

That appeals to some boaters though. You can spot them from a distance with the rooster tail 8'-10 above the water as they scream down the lake. You can hear them also at least a mile away.

Otherwise they are good engines, LOL

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You much be considering one of the "go fast" boats (Bullet, Allison, etc). Those motors can turn very high rpms, require high test gasoline, and may require you wear a flack jacket to protect you from flying engine parts when they explode.

They are quite noisy as compared to the non-racing engine models.

That appeals to some boaters though. You can spot them from a distance with the rooster tail 8'-10 above the water as they scream down the lake. You can hear them also at least a mile away.

Otherwise they are good engines, LOL

Yeah, its a 97 Bullet with a 2003 225 Promax on it! 10,000.........

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If you get it, do yourself a favor to save maintenance costs by keeping the engine setting low enough to keep the prop from surfacing so much. That will save your lower unit gears and also keep you from throwing a blade/s off the prop. Giant rooster tails are interesting to look at but are a maintenace headache.

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If you get it, do yourself a favor to save maintenance costs by keeping the engine setting low enough to keep the prop from surfacing so much.

In a Bullet, that will net you chine walk. Do some research on proper jack plate settings for that hull. On my buddy's Bullet, raising the motor to the right height solved a lot of handling issues.

Get a compression test done on it. Have a pro go over the whole boat before considering. That price seems a little on the low side, but not super low.

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In a Bullet, that will net you chine walk. Do some research on proper jack plate settings for that hull. On my buddy's Bullet, raising the motor to the right height solved a lot of handling issues.

Get a compression test done on it. Have a pro go over the whole boat before considering. That price seems a little on the low side, but not super low.

I have seen the results of that setting a lot of times. It also includes some unexpected 360 degree+ maneuvers when making a turn.

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Not really Wayne. Do you or have you owned or driven a Bullet? A properly set height on the jack plate won't result in either cavitation or 360° turns. Geez.

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Not really Wayne. Do you or have you owned or driven a Bullet? A properly set height on the jack plate won't result in either cavitation or 360° turns. Geez.

Are you all being serious or sarcastic?

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I'm thinking of buying a boat that has a 2003 225X (PROMAX) motor on it. Any of you all ever had any expirience with these motors or ever heard anything about them? Thanks!

What kind of boat do you have now?

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You must be considering one of the "go fast" boats (Bullet, Allison, etc). Those motors can turn very high rpms, require high test gasoline, and may require you wear a flack jacket to protect you from flying engine parts when they explode.

They are quite noisy as compared to the non-racing engine models.

That appeals to some boaters though. You can spot them from a distance with the rooster tail 8'-10 above the water as they scream down the lake. You can hear them also at least a mile away.

Otherwise they are good engines, LOL

You had me at GO FAST!:D :D :D

BTW I once had a Nitrous bike though.B)

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Are you all being serious or sarcastic?

Umm...kinda both. This can be a great boat, but you gotta have experience driving bass boats (or high performance boats) to really get the most from it .... and be able to handle it. If you've been driving "go fast" fiberglass boats for a few years, you're probably fine. It's definitely a new ball game, but you could handle it. But if you're stepping up from an aluminum boat with a 50hp, then I'd rethink that purchase. It's definitely not a boat for the inexperienced.

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I tend to disagree. If you're a no-brain yahoo with no experience and think it's cool to run across the lake with your hair on fire at WOT the first time out, a fast boat may well teach you a few hard lessons - that is if you, your passenger, and nearby boaters even survive the experience. If you're that kind of guy, do yourself and the world a favor and stay out of them. If you're a responsible and safe boater and work your way up the driving skill curve, no problem. You'll be OK and will love the boat once you get experience. I've lots of "highly experienced" boaters do stupid things in fast bass boats. Guess what? It ain't the boat's fault - it's always the numnuts who's driving it. The only way to learn to drive fast boats is to work your way up to it .... in a fast boat.

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My method is set trim all the way in and get up on plane. 30 mph is a good start. NOw trim it out and get used to the feel and steering. Find some waves or wakes to see how it fells. Come off plane, and watch how the boat acts, and how much to feather the throttle to keep the wake from overcoming the stern. Trim the motor in again, and get the hole shot to plane in one seamless action where your trimmed out as you hit that speed.

Once you are 100% cool with how it feels, add five mph to the equation and repeat the process. It takes some time. I'm at about 60 mph with maybe 8 hours behind the wheel of my buddy's Bullet. Remember the obvious - PDF, kill switch, etc.

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My method is set trim all the way in and get up on plane. 30 mph is a good start. NOw trim it out and get used to the feel and steering. Find some waves or wakes to see how it fells. Come off plane, and watch how the boat acts, and how much to feather the throttle to keep the wake from overcoming the stern. Trim the motor in again, and get the hole shot to plane in one seamless action where your trimmed out as you hit that speed.

Once you are 100% cool with how it feels, add five mph to the equation and repeat the process. It takes some time. I'm at about 60 mph with maybe 8 hours behind the wheel of my buddy's Bullet. Remember the obvious - PDF, kill switch, etc.

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Umm...kinda both. This can be a great boat, but you gotta have experience driving bass boats (or high performance boats) to really get the most from it .... and be able to handle it. If you've been driving "go fast" fiberglass boats for a few years, you're probably fine. It's definitely a new ball game, but you could handle it. But if you're stepping up from an aluminum boat with a 50hp, then I'd rethink that purchase. It's definitely not a boat for the inexperienced.

I have to agree here, if this is your first go fast boat man you have to make sure you know what the hell you are doing,the only way to gain thet is to do it yourself, just make d**n sure you take your time and learn at your own pace, do not go out and run as fast as it will go the first time out, there are so many things you need to learn before you even attempt to run a boat like this one, there is nothing wrong with owning a boat such as this one but please think of your saftey and the others you may have in the boat with you first.

these type of boats can be-little you in a heart beat as far as blowing up and such the engines have been pretty dependible, the only time I have seen these type of engines blow is usually due to what Wayne stated in the fact that there is error in the way these boats are run.

Take your time getting used to your boat and the power and you will do just fine think about saftey first and everything else will be ok, have the boat checked out by a good tech and drive it before you buy it.

Good luck and be safe !!!!

And send us some pics if you do decide to get it !!!!

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