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For Those Of You Who Slider Head Fish........ Question

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I'm getting ready to make an order off susquehanna fishing tackle for some Charlie Brewer slider heads, and need help deciding 2 things:

1) What size should I get 1/8 or 1/16 for water as shallow As a foot up to 5 feet?

2) Do I get 1 or 2 20 pack of the heads?

3) How often do you break off the heads?

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First off, make sure you get the Pro heads with the stronger hooks, you'll straighten the hooks on the regular slider heads with normal bass gear. I'd use the 1/8, especially if there is any current at all. 1 20 pk should be good and if the water isn't too cold and you're shorefishing I'd suggest wading out and retrieving any of the heads you can when they get snagged. They don't snag up a lot, I'd say you should be able to make it through a day and only lose maybe 4 or 5 on a bad day if you're just fishing rocks. If there's lots of log jams and bigger fish you'll probably lose more if you're fishing lighter line though.

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I prefer the 1/16 oz. I've never broken off a head. And I don't like the Spider head.

Ken

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I use both and have never broken a head either. For small finesse worms I prefer the original Classic Spider heads. The thin wire hook will bend and rust easily however. The listed weights for the Classic Spiders used to be about 1/2 of what they actually weighed.

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I would get both. I use the lightest I can but if its windy you may need to step up the weight. I would get 2 packs of each.

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1/8 pro spider sliders for me. I've used them for 20+ years and never had a problem. Honestly the hooks will dull before you lose them. I've gone to 3/16 also for some deeper water.

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First off, make sure you get the Pro heads with the stronger hooks, you'll straighten the hooks on the regular slider heads with normal bass gear. I'd use the 1/8, especially if there is any current at all. 1 20 pk should be good and if the water isn't too cold and you're shorefishing I'd suggest wading out and retrieving any of the heads you can when they get snagged. They don't snag up a lot, I'd say you should be able to make it through a day and only lose maybe 4 or 5 on a bad day if you're just fishing rocks. If there's lots of log jams and bigger fish you'll probably lose more if you're fishing lighter line though.

I had a tournament Saturday, and my boater gave me 4 heads, I lost 2 in the tournament by snagging them on logs under the water, then with the last 2 I took home with me, I lost 1 on a bush in the water, and lost one yesterday when I got it wedged/snagged between a rock on the opposite shoreline.

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Whats better on the Slider head, A zoom Centipede or a Zoom Finesse worm?

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I ordered:

- Charlie Brewer's Slider Spider Head 1/8

- Charlie Brewer's Spider Slider Classic Head 1/16

- Zoom Finesse worm (Junebug)

- Zoom Fish doctor (Junebug)

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When I use Slider heads--Spider Slider or Pro Slider-- I use the Slider worms. If I want to use another type of worm, I use a different rigging method.

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First off, make sure you get the Pro heads with the stronger hooks, you'll straighten the hooks on the regular slider heads with normal bass gear. I'd use the 1/8, especially if there is any current at all. 1 20 pk should be good and if the water isn't too cold and you're shorefishing I'd suggest wading out and retrieving any of the heads you can when they get snagged. They don't snag up a lot, I'd say you should be able to make it through a day and only lose maybe 4 or 5 on a bad day if you're just fishing rocks. If there's lots of log jams and bigger fish you'll probably lose more if you're fishing lighter line though.

Just thought I would revive this post because it comes up high on the list when google searching slider heads. The original slider heads were not designed to be fished on normal bass tackle. Lots of people all over the web, including a shamefully dismissive post on BassPro's reviews page, make strongly worded arguments against the light wire slider hooks because they "straighten out on big fish." They were/are designed to be fished on 4 and 6 lb. line on L action rods, which cushion the light line and light wire hook. The wire is thin to allow hooksets through plastic with those light lines.

Of course these hooks straighten out on a 6'6" M action rod with 8 or 10 lb. test and a 5 lber on the line. The rod, line, knot, hook is a chain. The lightest link will break first. If you were fishing for kingfish with 60 lb. braid and a M action bass rod, the rod would break because it is not designed to do that. The redesigned heavy hook sliders were made to accomodate people who were fishing slider techniques on heavier tackle, but you can see MANY photos on the web of Brewer or Brewer Jr. or Ray Scott with fish way over 5 lbs. caught on the original slider heads, fished properly with L action rods and light line.

You're going to lose some fish to line breakage even with proper light slider tackle, but in that case, the line is the weak link (or the angler is, you choose), and that's how its designed to be. As Brewer said in his video and book-- "It's sporting tackle, not horsing tackle." I personally enjoy the fun of very light tackle bass fishing, and have caught some big fish doing it. I've also lost some big fish, but that's part of what makes it fun-- its a challenge.

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I use the 1/8 oz. flat slider with 3 and 4 inch slider grubs and worms. I also use the weedless slider head, 1/8, and 1/4 oz. with the slider worms. They are fun to fish and I can usually pickup a couple of bass on them.

I like the slider worms because the tail floats up and doesn;t sink. I also use them on my drop shot sometimes because of that.

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SissySticks hit it on the head. Match your rig to your tackle. I have been using the classic spider slider jighead for years and have only lost a few jigs and have never had one straighten on me. Set your drag properly and you should be fine. I rig my classic spider jigheads on ML fast and xtra fast spinning rods with 6lb test with 8lb test on the spare spool. Sweep hookset does the job well for me. 

Probably about 90% of the time I have either a Slider worm, Slider grub, Yum Wooly Hawgtail or Yum Wooly Beavertail on my classic spider Slider jigheads. The only time I switch to the Pro Slider Spider jigheads is when I'm fishing some serious current around some serious hard cover like a dam tailrace when it's really churning. When I'm fishing these conditions and the pro spider, I'm usually fishing a M power F action rod with 8lb-10lb mono or 10lb-15lb braid.

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On June 13, 2012 at 8:44 PM, Bluebasser86 said:

First off, make sure you get the Pro heads with the stronger hooks, you'll straighten the hooks on the regular slider heads with normal bass gear. I'd use the 1/8, especially if there is any current at all. 1 20 pk should be good and if the water isn't too cold and you're shorefishing I'd suggest wading out and retrieving any of the heads you can when they get snagged. They don't snag up a lot, I'd say you should be able to make it through a day and only lose maybe 4 or 5 on a bad day if you're just fishing rocks. If there's lots of log jams and bigger fish you'll probably lose more if you're fishing lighter line though.

this,and get both sizes for when fishing calm small waters. you can use the slider grubs on em and they are great.

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On 6/15/2012 at 4:37 PM, basslover12345 said:

Any more advice?

I see you are from Olney, so here is some very specific advice.  Head to Trideaphia reservoir right now.  The water is super super low, exposing an enormous amount of the shallow flats that are covered in the spring and summer.  Take a ton of pictures of all the dips, channels, rock-piles, stumps, etc that dot it.  Make sure to include enough landmarks so that you can find them all again when the water is up.  Then, next spring, drag those worms around and across all that stuff. The bottom there is perfect for slider fishing and most of the bank guys I see seem to ignore the shallow flats.  When I get frustrated trying to find the big kids I will anchor my kayak right at the drop offs and can usually do pretty well for small bass fishing dragging small worms across those flats.   

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