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MichiganFishing1997

Rod Finish Question

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The other day i finished building my first rod, and used a two part epoxy finish.  I did the first coat, turning it and letting it sit for a day, then did the second coat, turning it every 5 minutes.  When i finished it seemed like there was maybe too much epoxy on the rod, because it was uneaven on the wraps, what did i do wrong?

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It sounds like you put too much finish on the rod.  If your coats are too thick it won't level properly and the finished product will look lumpy and uneven. 

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A way to insure you don't apply too much finish is, after coating your wraps and turning them for a short time. Stop turning for a few minutes and allow the excess finish to sag and wick it away with the corner of a clean dry paper towel. After absorbing the excess, continue turning the rod until the finish will support itself.

 

Ronnie

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if you turned it every 5 minutes that is one problem. let it run on the rod drier for 24 hours each coat.

as for the 2 coats try using light build flex coat finish it works very well when applying 2 coats.just remember to let

it run on the drier for 24 hours each coat.this is a self leveling epoxy and needs to turn on the rod drier at least 24 hours.

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this is a self leveling epoxy and needs to turn on the rod drier at least 24 hours.

 

It must be awful cold in your shop if you need to let your rods turn for 24 hours.  I set my timer to turn off at 4 hours for regular build and 6 hours for lite.  I'm usually putting the second coat on at 8 or 10 hours.  At 24 hours, you're approaching the time frame where you need to scuff the first coat to get the second coat to bond.

 

I agree that there was too much finish to level properly.  I also apply my finish, let the rod sit, and remove the sag with my application spatula.

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Unfortuanetly, wavy, lumpy, foot ball shaped epoxy on your first build is all too common.  Probably happens to almost every self taught rod builder in the first couple builds.  :whistle:

 

It must be awful cold in your shop if you need to let your rods turn for 24 hours.  I set my timer to turn off at 4 hours for regular build and 6 hours for lite.  I'm usually putting the second coat on at 8 or 10 hours.  At 24 hours, you're approaching the time frame where you need to scuff the first coat to get the second coat to bond.

 

I agree that there was too much finish to level properly.  I also apply my finish, let the rod sit, and remove the sag with my application spatula.

x2

 

The key to smooth epoxy is several lite coats, even if it is high build.  Usually my first coat soaks into the thread and not much more...usually I end up with 2 coats minimum, usually 3 coat.

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if you turned it every 5 minutes that is one problem. let it run on the rod drier for 24 hours each coat.

as for the 2 coats try using light build flex coat finish it works very well when applying 2 coats.just remember to let

it run on the drier for 24 hours each coat.this is a self leveling epoxy and needs to turn on the rod drier at least 24 hours.

He probably isn't using a motorized rod dryer.  Probably doing it by hand which is why he is rotating it.

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usually I end up with 2 coats minimum, usually 3 coat.

 

My procedure is:

 

First coat - lite build to penetrate the threads and fill the tunnels, unless I'm using CP, then I use regular.

Second coat - regular build

Third coat - if needed, is regular.  ...only if there is a dust bunny that lands in the second, is it needed!

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A way to insure you don't apply too much finish is, after coating your wraps and turning them for a short time. Stop turning for a few minutes and allow the excess finish to sag and wick it away with the corner of a clean dry paper towel. After absorbing the excess, continue turning the rod until the finish will support itself.

 

Ronnie

X2..... :idea2:

 

 

I also agree with the above statment you must have a very cold shop/room.

 

What finish are you using??? @75° room temp......

 

Depending on the finish it shouldn't take more than 8hrs for a non droop setup and then the cure is with in 24 hrs...

 

 

Good Luck & Tight Wraps   :Victory:

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What I've done (I'm using FlexCoat high build) is after applying, lightly heating it to thin it slightly. My drying motor turns at 5rpm and any excess will run faster than the motor is turning the blank, then I remove it with the applicator.  This method also has the advantage of removing any air bubbles although I haven't run into that problem with this product.

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I wast using a motorized drier, i had to do it by hand.  I guess i have learned now though.  So if i have it right, multiple thin coats, warm room temperature, and get a motorized rod drier? thanks again.

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Michigan. A motorized dryer is not a necessity, lots of rods have been built with out them. But they do make it easier. Good luck & post up some pics as you go.

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