Jump to content

Recommended Posts

looking to get my first baitcaster, I'm right handed and used to spinning reels so lefthanded baitcasters feel more comfortable, I'e read that you usually reel with your strong hand since baitcasters are meant for power fishing but honestly, my left hand is strong enough from spinning tackle.What are your opinions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do whichever feels better to you. I happen to do left for spinning, right for casting. Just the way I learned and prefer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I reeled with my left hand with spinners for years before getting a baitcaster and for me left hand baitcasters are way more comfortable. Reeling with my right hand feels awkward.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think it's more important to hold the ROD in your strong hand since that is what is controlling the fish...turning the handle is just for taking up line.

 

that being said, i use both. i'm right-handed and prefer working moving-type lures with right-handed reels and bottom-contact lures with lefty reels. try 'em both and see which you prefer. now before you get used to one way or the other is the perfect time to choose.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

looking to get my first baitcaster, I'm right handed and used to spinning reels so lefthanded baitcasters feel more comfortable, I'e read that you usually reel with your strong hand since baitcasters are meant for power fishing but honestly, my left hand is strong enough from spinning tackle.What are your opinions

You will find that winding with your left hand on a baitcaster is much different that on a spinning reel. Most people think that their left hand is strong enough/used to it enough after using a lefty spinning reel to jump to a left casting reel. This is not the case...at all. However, your left hand will get used to it in about a month.

 

On a spinning rod, the reel balances out the rod in your hands, so you don't have to hold the reel down because it just hangs down while you use it. This lets your right hand facilitate your left hand in winding. This is not noticeable, but you will understand what I mean when you use a lefty casting reel. You will feel much different while winding a lefty casting reel.

 

With a lefty casting setup, you have to hold the reel face up which puts more stress on your right hand. Your left hand will get use to winding a lefty baitcaster very quickly; probably about a month. Your right hand will be the one that feels uncomfortable. You will not know how to palm a reel until probably 1.5 months in because you will be trying to find the comfortable way to hold it. Some people will say that if you aren't comfortable with a lefty casting reel at first, you should just get a righty instead, but I have to disagree. Lefty is definitely the way to go and you will get used to and it will feel perfectly normal. Also, you will probably feels sore in your wrist for the first few trips unless you are fishing a really light set up, say under 10 oz. Your right thumb might feel sore too from pressing the thumb bar down repeatedly throughout a long fishing trip. It is not major or anything, just letting you know what may happen.

 

I would say go for the lefty reel, you will find it is very convenient to not have to switch hands. It will feel weird for the first month or so, but it is winter right now so you have time. I recommend that you try and cast a little bit everyday out at a pond or in the yard. It will feel more comfortable each time out. Another great way is to take your reel off the rod, tape the line down (around the spool) so it isn't loose on the spool, and wind it while watching TV or ride in the car or whatever.

 

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm left handed and when it comes to baitcasters I use right handed reels.  I like to impart the action of the rod with my left hand and I also feather the spool more naturally with my left thumb.  It also made it easier to learn coming from spinning setups.  

 

I fish for bass, pike and walleye, none of these are going wear me out trying to reel them to the boat.  If I was deep sea fishing and battling a fish for multiple hours then I'd want a left-handed reel because it's my stronger hand but for the fishing I do I don't need the power in my cranking side I'd rather use the better athletic ability of my left hand to give my bait the action and to feather the spool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally use both for different presentations, but also if one hand gets tired from a day of using the flipping stick or a long day of frogging the slop, I have rods set up identical just on the other hand to prevent the "claw". If you already hold a spinning rod with your right and reel with your left I would suggest you start with a lefty baitcaster, but don't be afraid to add a righty later on.

 

Mitch 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think it's more important to hold the ROD in your strong hand since that is what is controlling the fish...turning the handle is just for taking up line.

 

that being said, i use both. i'm right-handed and prefer working moving-type lures with right-handed reels and bottom-contact lures with lefty reels. try 'em both and see which you prefer. now before you get used to one way or the other is the perfect time to choose.

 

 

I agree with this. if you really havent used a baitcaster yet now is the time to choose your hand. I cast (every time) with my right hand and when flipping and working some other baits i dont like switching hands. I dont mind it for my spinnerbait reels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everybody, several people affirmed what I had been thinking;that i should control he fish and set the hook with my strong arm. I'll probably buy a lefthanded baitcaster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm right handed and I've been doing right hand crank on baitcaster for decades. Last year I tried to switch to lefty so that I can pitch with right hand and quickly get a hold of the handle with my left hand without changing the rod hand.

 

Well, didn't work. I felt pain on my right wrist after using one day. Basically I over worked right wrist. My right wrist didn't get the usual break of switching rod hands all day.  Now this rod was long 7'7" pitching/flipping rod which is heavy, very different from light shorter spinning tackle I think. But, this something to think about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everybody, several people affirmed what I had been thinking;that i should control he fish and set the hook with my strong arm. I'll probably buy a lefthanded baitcaster

Get from somewhere you can easily exchanged to righty if it doesn't work out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used spinning reels with my left hand reeling, and when I got my first baitcaster, I went through the same decision. I found reeling a baitcaster with my left hand was awkward, so I went with righty reels and have been very happy. I read on here that with a spinning rod, you use the rod to bring the fish in, so having your power hand on the rod makes sense. But for baitcasting, you use the reel to winch the fish in, so reeling righty puts your power hand on the handle. Seems to make sense.

 

Either way, go with what is comfortable for you. The only benefit of going with right handed reels is generally reel companies offer more reels with different options in right handed than they do in left handed because right handed is more popular.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I read on here that with a spinning rod, you use the rod to bring the fish in, so having your power hand on the rod makes sense. But for baitcasting, you use the reel to winch the fish in, so reeling righty puts your power hand on the handle. Seems to make sense.

 

 

I can't agree on the statement, as least for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everybody, several people affirmed what I had been thinking;that i should control he fish and set the hook with my strong arm. I'll probably buy a lefthanded baitcaster

I think you made the right decision for your first baitcast reel.  Personally I don't see why a left hand baitcast reel could feel awkward when you are use to using only that hand to reel with.  I was like you.  Was using only spinning reels, and reeling with my left hand.  Right hand reels were awkward at first.

 

I would suggest that your second baitcast reel be a righty.  It doesn't take long to learn to crank with the right hand.  Being able to use either hand not only allows you to switch during a day of fishing so as to not become overly tired, but more than doubles your choice of reels.  I say more than doubles, because there are still plenty of reels that are only made in right hand, but no reels that are made only in left hand.

 

It will take a bit longer to learn to cast with either hand, but is well worth the effort to learn.  I spent last summer casting with both hands.  Now I can cast just as far left handed as right handed although accuracy on the left side still isn't quite as good as on the right.  This past season did one thing for me.  Although I have no problem reeling with either hand, I came to realize that I still prefer the left hand for reeling, and plan on limiting future purchases to left hand reels.............unless a righty only model comes up for sale at a great price.  The only bad thing about being able to use either hand is the amount of money you can spend on new or new-2-you reels.   :teeth:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to agree with the above poster.  As I made a gradual transition, 20+ years ago, from almost exclusively spinning to mostly bait casters, I had trouble using my right hand to rhythmically retrieve walking baits (with a bc).  I was accustomed to using my left hand with a spinning rig to retrieve smaller baits like the Zara Puppy while keeping a rod rhythm with my right hand.  At that point it just made sense to stick with right hand reeling for all my outfits, including spooks, poppers, etc.  Wrist strength seems to me to be less of a factor since today's longer handled rods incorporate forearm and body with hook sets and retrieves.  That said, I go along with the general theme of posters - go with YOUR most comfortable technique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use both lefty and righty reels. Try a few out, and see what feels better. By try, I mean actually cast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taylor,  I used spinning gear up until 2 years ago.  The first casters I got were righty and I never felt comfortable.  I started getting lefties and never looked back.  Now I'm trying to sell my righties.  Short answer, go with left-hand reels. 

 

My biggest regret in fishing is all of the money I've wasted on tackle and gear I don't use.  I have rods that just sit there and a tackle bag full of stuff I don't use. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm another weirdo. I'm a lefty but other than writing and playing softball and baseball, I do everything right handed.

My dad was old school and taught me to do everything right handed as if I could decide to be right handed even tho my body and brain wants to be left side dominant.... so fishing naturally fell in there too. Heck as a law enforcement officer, I used to carry and shoot right handed and was in the top 10% at qualifying annually. But even though I do a lot right handed, I can still do everything left handed and it for most part feels natural.

Fast forward to 31 years old and bass fishing for 12 plus years. I buy right handed reels. For the most part, I fish right handed. If I'm pitching or punching at a fast pace, I will physically pitch with my left hand so I don't have to switch hands.. if I'm on a topwater bite and they are hitting within seconds of hitting the water, ill cast left handed. It also helps to be able to roll cast with the "other" hand beciase it opens a whole field of angles and targets to roll cast or pitch to.

My suggestion to the OP is to get your hands on so.e rods and reels and practice. See what feels natural

My suggestions to other guys, try using the wrong hand and see what u can do with it.

My dad forcing me to be right handed sucked, bit I'm glad he did, because it made me ambidextrous... And helped me a ton in not only in pitching and flipping but as a person who uses tools on a daily basis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×