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Missed Jig Bites

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I'm hoping Tom (WRB) will post an answer to this, but anyone else qualified to do so, please help me out.

 

I recall Tom posting that (I'm paraphrasing): A. Over 90% of jig strikes go undetected by the average angler, and that, B. He (Tom) can detect at least some of the missed strikes and can try to catch those particular missed bass.

 

By jigs, I strictly mean casting jigs fished horizontally on a long cast.

 

My problem is that I'm feeling only two or three half-bites or might-have-been-bites for every jig fish I catch (I'm not even sure these are bites to begin with). I almost always fish the same weight jig, and fish jigs a fair percentage of time on the water. I'm pretty familiar with the bottom I'm fishing. I'm watching and feeling the line, which is a premium fluorocarbon.

 

So, obviously I'm missing bites. How can I improve my strike detection ratio?

 

Also, how can I try to catch the fish I miss? Tom wasn't clear on this. Throw back a worm maybe?

 

Thanks,

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Yer gonna have to practice concentrating on feeling your line and keep it semi tight

with other lures I set the hook accordinglky depending on what the fish is giving me

With jigs I am on edge and set the hook as soon as I suspect a bite

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Deep, just use a swimbait trailer.  Seems you have those down pat!  :D

 

Jeff

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Jeff I wad thinking the same thing. Deep seemed.to have them dialed in some time back with the hudd!

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Hooksets are free.  If it feels like a fish, wack 'em.

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Jig fishing can produce many nice bass but here is some input for you to consider:

1.  Bluegills and small bass can drive you nuts by hitting your jig.

2.  Bottom structure can fool you.

3.  As you are doing, always keep your finger on the line.

4.  As stated above, hook sets are free so "give 'em a whack."

5.  Know the crawfish colors in your neck of the woods and if they change during the year. Mimic them as best you can.

6.  Sometime you need a large profile in warm water and a compact profile in cold water. Your "pig" will control this profile.

7.  Place a short piece of a finesse worm the color of the skirt on the hook close to the jig's head. Then add the trailer. The finesse worm will keep the pig from twisting.

8.  Concentrate. Jig fishing can be slow and you can lose your concentration.  Step back; look all around; take a deep breath; shake any cobwebs out of your head; and hit the water again.

9.  Call your game and fisheries and ask for the "crawfish expert."  Ask the individual how the crawfish act in the water. Do they scoot fast when approached? Do they like to hide in wood?  Are they the burrowing species?  Are they in the grass?  Then mimic both the color and how they move.

 

Good luck and posts some pics of those giants you will catch with your jigs.

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The greatest instructional tool available to the anglers wanting to learn "feel" bites is night time!

 

I don't mean a couple hours here & there, that will only teach you frustration

 

Start with the spawn & fish the entire year until the next spawn, I promise your bite detection & hookup ratio will increase two fold!

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All the above plus, use the most sensitive rod you can afford.  It's startling how much more you can feel through a great rod.

 

 

Tight lines,

Bob

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I've just started fishing a jig again in October, 

normally I don't, but it was staring at me every 

time I opened a particular box of lures, LOL.

 

Anyway, I've been experimenting and have found 

that a slow drag across the bottom is the best 

in my waters. By best I mean most productive. 

 

I keep my index finger just under the line. Like 

Sam said, it can be very very slooooow.... :smiley:

 

When I get a strike, I react on instinct, it seems.

After the fish I try to replay what I felt. As well, 

when I get a short strike, I reel in and throw a 

worm. Have caught the shorties this way.

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90%.... That's seems like a huge number and a little over exaggerated.

So if I'm fishing for 2 hours and get 20 bites I'm only gonna notice 2 of them?? Idk that just seems like a lot.

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  I jig fish a lot. I think as a rule your not going to get as many bites but the ones you get are better fish. Not always. As for bites jig fishing is different. Your not going to get that big pop that your always going to want. Sometimes you go to lift it and it's just heavy or you can't feel the jig at all. I had one this year pop it hard and I set the hook and the fish was gone. I reeled it in and she was under the boat, when we netted her she was our 5.3 pound kicker. So a large fish can move very fast. With small fish picking at the skirts and larger fish bitting so different I don't know how anyone would know while jig fishing that your missing bites. I've had small rock bass and blue gill pop my jig and run with it. Some you hook and they fly over your head and some you miss and wonder. But they all felt like a bass. That's just jig fishing.

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The greatest instructional tool available to the anglers wanting to learn "feel" bites is night time!

 

I don't mean a couple hours here & there, that will only teach you frustration

 

Start with the spawn & fish the entire year until the next spawn, I promise your bite detection & hookup ratio will increase two fold!

 

~ X2 ~ This is a Game Changer.

 

  Nocturnal Operations will also improve one's casting/ presentation accuracy quite a bit.

 

When you can place your bait in tight spots in very limited to no light conditions, day light angling gets much easier.

 

A-Jay

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I can see how it's fairly possible to miss a good portion of jig bites when you're fishing deep but not shallow.  

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I'm hoping Tom (WRB) will post an answer to this, but anyone else qualified to do so, please help me out.

I recall Tom posting that (I'm paraphrasing): A. Over 90% of jig strikes go undetected by the average angler, and that, B. He (Tom) can detect at least some of the missed strikes and can try to catch those particular missed bass.

By jigs, I strictly mean casting jigs fished horizontally on a long cast.

My problem is that I'm feeling only two or three half-bites or might-have-been-bites for every jig fish I catch (I'm not even sure these are bites to begin with). I almost always fish the same weight jig, and fish jigs a fair percentage of time on the water. I'm pretty familiar with the bottom I'm fishing. I'm watching and feeling the line, which is a premium fluorocarbon.

So, obviously I'm missing bites. How can I improve my strike detection ratio?

Also, how can I try to catch the fish I miss? Tom wasn't clear on this. Throw back a worm maybe?

Thanks,

There are so many myths regarding bass fishing, the applies with missed jig strikes is you can tease that bass into striking again by making more casts with the same jig until the bass gets angered into striking, other than bed fish.

The bass decided to strike your jig tentatively because it wasn't committed or detected something wasn't right.

Missed strikes tell you a bass is there and is interested just not enough to kill the jig. You have a few choices to make, change trailer size, jig weight to increase or decrease the rate of fall or change color combination and change the angle the jig moving into the spot the strike occurred.

During the fall and winter my first reaction to a missed strike is a few choice words followed by picking up a heavier jig with smaller trailer, moving my position to change the angle and give it another cast or two.

My next move is away from the spot to let it rest about 20 minutes by fishing a nearby spot and change to either a different color combo of the same jig, swimbait or big worm and try again.

Jig strikes from big adult size bass can be very difficult to detect because a jig is a small size lure going into a largemouth, the bass doesn't bit it, it vacuums it in. The tick you sometimes feel is a series of crunches the bass does to kill the prey, after the jig is in it's mouth. If the bass decides something is wrong the jig goes back out just as fast as it went in. If you think you are detecting a high % of jig strikes, then you should be catching a high % of large adult size bass!

If you want to test your strike detection skills try bed fishing with a jig and close your eyes. Bed bass are very aggressive and it's still difficult to feel a strike until the bass swims away with the jig to get it out of the nest before spitting the lure out.

Fishing at night will sharpen your senses and improve both jig and worm strike detection, bass are also more aggressive at night.

Tom

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Couple things since I know you and fish with you.

 

#1 you fish from shore and are throwing into rather deep water this time of year (20'?). You fish flouro. Braid and a flouro leader is MUCH more sensitive and better hookset with lest stretch

 

#2 You are a line watcher. 

 

When we fish from the boat in shallower water you are a great jig fisherman and you pitching and flipping is top notch.

 

I think in your situation a carolina rig would be a much better option. You are using the wrong tool for the job.

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Fishing jigs from shoreline means you are working uphill most of the time, difficult in the fall and winter.

The major points are your best bets and can be fished parallel or slightly down hill depending on where you stand near the base if the point.

A 3/4 oz jig with 3" to 4" trailer should give you a better feel and easier strike detection than a 1/2 oz for example. The problem is hanging up the heavier jig more, the lighter weight 1/2 or 3/8 will get through rocks easier.

Tom

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~ X2 ~ This is a Game Changer.

 

  Nocturnal Operations will also improve one's casting/ presentation accuracy quite a bit.

 

When you can place your bait in tight spots in very limited to no light conditions, day light angling gets much easier.

 

A-Jay

 

 

Once your nerves settle down, your eye sight adjusts, you ignore those strange sounds, then will you "sense" the environment!

 

Don't be afraid of the night be afraid of what hunts in the night ;)

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Cut off the weed guard...

 

 

oe

Or trim the longer guards to the barb.

I did this to a few of my older Booyah's and it improved detection.

Mike

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Thanks everyone. Night fishing is not something I like to do a whole lot, not sure why; just don't like it. But I can suck it up.

 

 

Cut off the weed guard...

 

 

oe

 

My custom jigs don't have one to begin with!

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I'm curious though, why would strike detection be better with no weedguard? The bass holds on to the bait longer?

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I still say its the wrong tool for the job. Shallow fish will eat a jig dood. Deeper less active fish may not.

 

 

Can't fish deep down south without a jig tied on  ;)

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