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Barometric Pressure

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what would you consider LOW, NORMAL, and HIGH barometric pressure?

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The 'standard' pressure is 1013mb or 29.92 in-hg. So high or low from that number :).

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That's simply the standard for one atm unit, or atmosphere.  It's the average pressure at sea level for Earth.

 

Think of baro in relative terms: higher, lower, rising, falling, steady......  relate to your fishing experiences, though it's just ONE piece of data in a sea that can be collected, and you still won't know if they will bite or not. ;)

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thats true^ lol sadly.

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If there was a small set of things that allowed you to predict the bite, this site wouldn't exist.  There's slight edges here, and there.  You build up your knowledge, apply to what works in your water, and what can be even be applied.  Try to put together those edges to give yourself an advantage on that trip.  It doesn't always work, but some things work with more predictability with time.

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word, i cant wait to get better at predicting the mood of the fish. also finding the fish without a fish finder can be hard at times.

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I did a ton of fishing without a graph this year - never hooked up the graph on the new kayak.  Granted I was fishing places that I knew very well, but it really taught me about my dependence on electronics.  Fished a lot of shallow spots (I turn my graphs off in less than 10' of water anyway) that I might have passed up.  Caught some fish, too.

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yea 29.92 is the norm or 1 atmosphere as a measurment of pressure.  When it comes the weather, the norm in some areas can be higher or lower than this number.  Not by much but there can be a difference.  I like to fish during dropping pressure.  Doesn't matter if its over 30 or under 30.  If it's dropping, I am usually trying to catch fish.

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I did a ton of fishing without a graph this year - never hooked up the graph on the new kayak.  Granted I was fishing places that I knew very well, but it really taught me about my dependence on electronics.  Fished a lot of shallow spots (I turn my graphs off in less than 10' of water anyway) that I might have passed up.  Caught some fish, too.

thats a nice way to challenge yourself tho

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Forget all these different pressures, if the cows a laying down, turn the truck around and go home. Its as simple as that!! Lol

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Exactly what J Francho said ;)

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J is right that it's all about the change...Change in weather are what fish react to.  

 

If you want to get deep into the barometric pressure discussion, realize this... The number you see in the weather report is not the exact physical value for where you are standing.  Pressure changes with elevation, the higher you go - the lower it gets.  It's reported/predicted/calculated as if it were 'brought' down to sea level to keep everything normalized.  

 

If you look at a weather report for Denver, you'll see normal value...Something between 990 and 1030mb.  However the 'raw' number there is probably somewhere around 800mb since it's a mile above sea level (could be off, just guessed...Haven't worked on this stuff in a while).  It's standardized to sea level so that it can be useful in forecasting.  

 

How does it relate to bass fishing?  Well, it really doesn't.  The biggest short term change you'll EVER see in Baro Pressure (think hurricane-type event) is the equivalent of moving up or down maybe foot or two underwater.  Think of how many times a day a fish might move a foot or two in depth and you'll soon realize that the atmospheric pressure is pretty much irrelevant to the fish.  

 

What is IS...is a symptom of the larger weather pattern.  The pressure changes with things like fronts/storms/ridges.  Those things bring wind, clouds, rain, cold, etc...Those are the things that drive fish mood, the pressure is just a symptom of those (as it relates to Bass Fishing).  I wouldn't worry about the pressure, I'd worry about the other things...But most importantly, just go fish! :)

 

 

 

Having a degree in Meteorology certainly helps with some things in the fishing world, at least I'm using it for something since I never became a weatherman ;).

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wow haha so much good info

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 The biggest short term change you'll EVER see in Baro Pressure (think hurricane-type event) is the equivalent of moving up or down maybe foot or two underwater.  Think of how many times a day a fish might move a foot or two in depth and you'll soon realize that the atmospheric pressure is pretty much irrelevant to the fish.  

 

 

Over the years, I've read a lot of things about the pressure affecting the fishing.  But as explained above, it's hard to match that up with facts.  To bring it along a bit further, the normal changes in barometric pressure over the course of the day, or day-to-day, are more like the equivalent of the fish changing depths by just several inches.

 

Scientists say a link to barometric pressure and fish activity does not exist, but LOTS of experienced fishermen do.

 

Just another one of life's little mysteries!  

 

Tight lines,

Bob

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J is right that it's all about the change...Change in weather are what fish react to.  

 

If you want to get deep into the barometric pressure discussion, realize this... The number you see in the weather report is not the exact physical value for where you are standing.  Pressure changes with elevation, the higher you go - the lower it gets.  It's reported/predicted/calculated as if it were 'brought' down to sea level to keep everything normalized.  

 

If you look at a weather report for Denver, you'll see normal value...Something between 990 and 1030mb.  However the 'raw' number there is probably somewhere around 800mb since it's a mile above sea level (could be off, just guessed...Haven't worked on this stuff in a while).  It's standardized to sea level so that it can be useful in forecasting.  

 

How does it relate to bass fishing?  Well, it really doesn't.  The biggest short term change you'll EVER see in Baro Pressure (think hurricane-type event) is the equivalent of moving up or down maybe foot or two underwater.  Think of how many times a day a fish might move a foot or two in depth and you'll soon realize that the atmospheric pressure is pretty much irrelevant to the fish.  

 

What is IS...is a symptom of the larger weather pattern.  The pressure changes with things like fronts/storms/ridges.  Those things bring wind, clouds, rain, cold, etc...Those are the things that drive fish mood, the pressure is just a symptom of those (as it relates to Bass Fishing).  I wouldn't worry about the pressure, I'd worry about the other things...But most importantly, just go fish! :)

 

 

 

Having a degree in Meteorology certainly helps with some things in the fishing world, at least I'm using it for something since I never became a weatherman ;).

GREAT post.

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Give me a huge slow moving front and I`m out thumpin fish. When the sky opens and turns blue, the wind picks up, I`m heading home to cut the yard, hang moms curtains ,ect

 

After having watched thousands of  fronts come and go and experiencing the aforementioned scenario many, many  times,I have a difficult time trying to discount  the pressure theory.

 

Good thread ,and please no  one take offense to my thoughts.

C22

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Here's the take home from Stratos20SS's post:

J is right that it's all about the change...Change in weather are what fish react to.  

...

What is IS...is a symptom of the larger weather pattern.  The pressure changes with things like fronts/storms/ridges.  Those things bring wind, clouds, rain, cold, etc...Those are the things that drive fish mood, the pressure is just a symptom of those (as it relates to Bass Fishing).  I wouldn't worry about the pressure, I'd worry about the other things...But most importantly, just go fish! :)

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Forget all these different pressures, if the cows a laying down, turn the truck around and go home. Its as simple as that!! Lol

No LOL here............I agree. Seen it many times.

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