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hoosierbass07

Feathering Line When Using Baitcasters

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 For those of you that use baitcasters, do you feather the line when you cast during the whole cast?  I mean, do you keep your thumb touching the line while you cast during the whole cast?  I have one Shimano chronarch 200e6.  I've had it for two years but I have not used it much.  I just on 17 pound mono line yesterday.  I want to use it more this year for spinnerbaits and crankbaits.  I know, 17 pound line might be too big for crankbaits but I want try 17 pound line and see if it's easier to learn how to cast baitcasters.  

 

Thanks!

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Unless you get very comfortable and have the breaks/cast control just right its a good idea to keep you thumb on the spool. It will be extremely light touch during the cast but helps get the feel if a backlash starts so you can stop it quickly.

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I have gotten myself conditioned to give a quick, light touch the second after I cast; just to slow the spool a hair, then I stop the spool completely when I see the bait hit the water. My thumb isn't on the spool the whole cast, just that one quick touch.

IMO, 17 lb mono is going to be harder to cast than some other lines would be. The memory you're going to have with that line is going to make it spring off the reel easier than a smaller lb test line would. Personally, I'd put on 20lb braid, tie on a rattle trap and go to town. That's some of the easiest setup to learn with.

If you are insistant on using that line, just tie on a heavier bait; one that doesn't catch too much wind.

Watch some vids on how to set up a baitcaster, do what they say in the vids, and you'll be fine.

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I have gotten myself conditioned to give a quick, light touch the second after I cast; just to slow the spool a hair,...

 

  

  That's interesting and something I've not done before.  I might try that.  I read online that baitcasters are easier to learn with heavier line.  Last year I had on twelve pound Sufix mono and I could cast it OK but I hardly used it in my fishing.  In fact I think I only used it one day out of the whole year.  I paid $200 for that baitcaster, I want to get my money's worth out of the dang thing. lol.  

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The amount of thumb needed to cast varies reel to reel, Rod yo rod and bait to bait and even cast to cast depending on distance to the target. All you can do is practice and develop a style that works for you.

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I learned without all the fancy brakes to adjust, and this knob over here and a dial over there.  I leave all that crap at zero, fill it with line, check the spool tension knob and make sure the lure falls at a rate I like and go fishing.  But then maybe that's just me.

 

Edit: But I do ride my thumb ever so lightly on the spool to feel what the line is doing and how fast it's coming off.

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I will lightly thumb the spool if there is strong wind, otherwise I rarely touch it until I want it to stop. I would suggest to always be aware that you do not overcast.  If you throw it as hard as you can, there is a very good chance for a backash.  Just an easy cast will get it out there good enough.

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Usually feathering the spool is done when you are targeting exposed structure or you like to present the lure with a controlled, stealthy way during splash down.  I also feather my spool when pitching to cover around the banks.

 

I also feather the spool when casting to the wind or to prevent/stop birdsnest during a cast.

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I keep my thumb over the spool during the cast, not on it. Thumb braking is applied only when I feel a fluff coming on, which isn't often. I set my reels (all Shimanos) pretty loose too.

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How is your braking set?  12# mono is an excellent weight line to learn on.  As already stated, too heavy, and you will get more coils.  I really like Sufix lines.  Elite or Siege will work great.  Personally I don't think 20# braid is a good option for a beginner.  Too great a chance for digging in which will cause you headaches.  If going braid,  I would recommend 40-50# braid to learn on.  You didn't mention lure weight or rod power being used.  There is a stickie on setting up baitcast reels plus plenty of threads offering advice on setting up the reel correctly and how to learn to cast.

 

Try to use a lure on the upper end of the rod's rating.  I suggest starting with a side arm roll cast.  This helps keep the rod tip loaded which in turn helps eliminate backlashes from jerky rod reversals.

 

I try to keep my thumb just over the line.  This allows me to feel when the spool starts to fluff.  Even then I don't always slow the spool down if it is in the middle of the cast.  Often times the reel straightens itself out.  However, I don't want it fluffing at the end of a cast.  On occasion I have messed up and caught something at the beginning of the cast.  In this case feathering isn't normally required.  A fast thumb to stop the spool is preferred.  :teeth:

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The main key to a baitcaster isn't so much the thumb skulls hut more of how you cast and let the rod load properly. A smooth back cast and release at the right point is critical. You don't need to chick it as hard as you possibly can. The only time I really have to focus on my thumb is casting 1/8 oz xraps which aren't really meant for casting gear. As someone as previously said I mainly just feather the spool at the begining and then let the rod and reel do the work. For most applications on my shimanos I set two pins in the out position on opposite sides of the spool and then just allow a little play in the spool with the spool tension knob.

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Nope, no thumb on a outcast, not ever. At splashdown, then yea... I do feather my cast on spinning thou..

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I only ever touch the spool during a cast when I can tell it's getting out of control.  Thumbing the spool slows it down too much to be useful on a regular cast.  I always thumb the spool when the bait hits the water.

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I always tell learners to lightly feather it until they get the hang of it. 

 

I actually have the problem of feathering it too often. I mainly nightfished during my highschool years, and to avoid backlashes we always feathered it a bit too much just because it was hard to untangle a birds nest in the dark.

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I keep my thumb over the spool during the cast, not on it. Thumb braking is applied only when I feel a fluff coming on, which isn't often.

Same Here

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Everything affects how fast the spool on your reel spins when you cast; settings on reel, wind direction, lure weight, the way you handle your tackle, line size, type of line, and on and on.  You can set up your reel just exactly the way manufacture tells you, turn 180 degrees and cast the other way, into or with the wind, and need to feather the spool.

How you do it is just a matter of practice.  If I have everything set just right, I can cast without touching the line, but change anything and the mechanics of the reel need some human help.

You learn to do this with practice, practice, practice,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. Get the point?

Some of us are old enough to have learned how to cast with a 5' steel rod and a "plug" casting reel that had no controls. When you cast a lure the handle spun with the reel.  If a fish ran beyond your control, the reel handles spun, hence the name "knuckle buster".  We cast everything from a big daredevil to a bobber with a "perch" hook and the only control was our thumb.  After while, your thumb on the spool is pure instinct, and you don't analyze it, just do it.

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It is most important to have a smooth motion with the rod when casting. Snapping the rod too hard or too quick will cause a backlash. You can put a lot of energy into a cast, but it has to be smooth and the timing must be right.

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How is your braking set?  12# mono is an excellent weight line to learn on.  As already stated, too heavy, and you will get more coils.  I really like Sufix lines.  Elite or Siege will work great.

 

Listen to this man. I learned on 12# Siege with a Chronarch 200e7. I think at 17# you're starting with heavier line than needed and making life more difficult on yourself. 

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I usually don't have to touch the spool much. Maybe a touch at the beginning and ofc at the end before it hits the water. It all depends on other factors though. Your lure, line, rod, reel, and wind all matter as does experience. Occasionally I might need to thumb it for a sec in the middle if it starts to overrun and let the lure pull it out. That comes with experience though. I am kind of the abnormality since I almost never ever use any tension and most people always do like it's mandatory for whatever reason. Any newer reel you can set with pretty much just pins and mag and cast anything without having to thumb the spool since the reel will do the work. That's a great way to start when learning and back everything off as you get more comfortable. Eventually you can get down to 1 or 2 pins with 0 tension and be casting like a champ.

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A bird's nest happens when the spool spins faster than the bait/line is traveling.  With that said, recognize the difference between thumbing the spool and feathering the line leaving the spool.  Thumbing the spool will slow the spool speed to match the line speed and reduce a bird's nest.  Feathering the line will slow the line without slowing the spool and will often increase the chances of a bird's nest.

 

 

oe

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 Well, want I'm wanting to cast are crankbaits and spinnerbaits.  I'm not much of a crankbait user but I want to use them more this spring.  So I figured I would put my one baitcaster to use.  I weighed my main crankbaits I'm going to be using this spring  and they weigh from .35oz. to .65oz. with most being .350z.  The spinnerbaits I weighed are about the same.  My only crankbait rod is a Vigilante 6'6" medium that is rated for 1/4 to 5/8 oz. lures and 8-17 pound line.  

 

 I figured if I use crankbaits a lot then I will get some snagged so I better use heavy line.  But I do wan to use a line that will let me cast a crankbait out far enough for it be effective.  

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I almost never touch the spool during a cast in open water, but when I am target casting its beneficial to control trajectory and entry of the lure to avoid spooking the fish near the target... But with most casting equipment I dont need to thumb the spool in order to not backlash...

 

Mitch

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Well, want I'm wanting to cast are crankbaits and spinnerbaits. I'm not much of a crankbait user but I want to use them more this spring. So I figured I would put my one baitcaster to use. I weighed my main crankbaits I'm going to be using this spring and they weigh from .35oz. to .65oz. with most being .350z. The spinnerbaits I weighed are about the same. My only crankbait rod is a Vigilante 6'6" medium that is rated for 1/4 to 5/8 oz. lures and 8-17 pound line.

I figured if I use crankbaits a lot then I will get some snagged so I better use heavy line. But I do wan to use a line that will let me cast a crankbait out far enough for it be effective.

12 pound test yo-zuri hybrid breaks at about 17ish pounds. Nor only will the heavy line be hard to handle and cast it will prevent your bait from diving as deep as it should. A lot of people would disagree with me on this next suggestion but maybe consider 30# braid. Its easier to get a backlash out and it doesn't get kinked when you do backlash. It will also be thin enough to get down to its running depth quick.

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One thing to keep an mind, the OP is a newbie to baitcasting, while the answers have been a good a lot have been geared towards what experienced guys do now No one started out by picking up a BC for the first time and just casted with no brakes and no thumb. All in due time but it takes some experience to get there. Attempting to cast like this immediately will cause frustration and some people to give up.

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