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Heron

Curly Worm Flat Sides

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Im not even sure how to word this question....but.

 

On curly worms with a flat side, is this flat side supposed to be the bottom of the worm? If so then why is the flat side of the tail aligned with the flat side of the worm?

 

This makes the curl of the tail oriented left-to-right, instead of top-to-bottom.  Are we supposed to be rigging such worms with the curl of the tail laying to one side?  Im confused why the worm molds are even made carved out this way. 

 

 

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A lot of ribbontailed worms are like this, e.g., culprit, zoom. I have heard people say you should rig the tail pointing up or down, regardless of which side is flat. The reasons given are that the action is better, or it hangs up less, or it reduces line twist. I have also heard people say they fall slower if you rig with the flat side down.

 

I personally have never noticed a difference in any of those things, or in strike/catch rates, when rigging them up, down, sideways, diagonal, whatever. 

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I would also think that no matter how you rig them, they will shift and move under the water anyways.  I never even give it a second thought when I am rigging them and haven't noticed any difference.  Maybe next time i go out i will rig specifically one way and see if that changes anything.

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The flat side to me is considered the bottom. This is where the hook point goes in to rig.

The point lies on or in (to tex pose) the ribs etc. on the top of the worm.

When I use a ribbon tail, 90% of the time I'm reeling to get the tail moving, which is the attraction. Up, down or sideways it's gonna move which is what it's designed to do.

Mike

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The flat side to me is considered the bottom. This is where the hook point goes in to rig.

The point lies on or in (to tex pose) the ribs etc. on the top of the worm.

When I use a ribbon tail, 90% of the time I'm reeling to get the tail moving, which is the attraction. Up, down or sideways it's gonna move which is what it's designed to do.

Mike

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It does´t matter, rig them any way you want.

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It does´t matter, rig them any way you want.

I want to agree with this...

 

But, if it doesn't matter, then why do they bother making the worm with a flat side?   Whats the point of it?

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I want to agree with this...

 

But, if it doesn't matter, then why do they bother making the worm with a flat side?   Whats the point of it?

A mold is probably easier to make with a flat side...The actual mold only needs to be one plate and it can either be open for a hand pour or have a flat back plate for injection.  Full round molds need to have a cavity in each plate.

 

Regardless, I usually rig with the flat side down.

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I want to agree with this...

But, if it doesn't matter, then why do they bother making the worm with a flat side? Whats the point of it?

Mold design, to make a round body soft plastic the mold is split into 2 halves, each side a mirror image with half round matching body, the seam called a parting line. The split mold worms are injection molded, high production products. The flat sided soft plastics only have I sided molds called hand poured low production molds. You don't see many curl tail worms hand poured because the tail thickness is in consistant. The one exception is Roboworms automated precision poured worms.

Tom

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A mold is probably easier to make with a flat side...The actual mold only needs to be one plate and it can either be open for a hand pour or have a flat back plate for injection.  Full round molds need to have a cavity in each plate.

 

Regardless, I usually rig with the flat side down.

Easier to make with a flat side eh?  

 

But yet, most of these companies don't seem to mind using two-plate molds for most of their other products (sometimes with intricate designs), such as grubs, beavers, stick worms, craws, etc,  That reason doesn't seem consistent.

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It was just a guess...It's probably easy to make intricate molds for mass production in 2015...But when the original molds were made for many worms 30-40 or more years ago it was probably much more difficult.  Companies probably just kept the shapes the same when new technology came along since they were already defined, sold, and successful.  

 

As far as rigging...If the bait is round, I rig it with the tail vertical.  If the bait has a flat side, I put the flat side on the bottom.  Although to be honest, I've never really given it any thought.  That's just what made sense way back when I first started and I've continued it on auto-pilot.  I don't think it makes a difference either way.

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With curl tail worms or grubs rig the curl down for more wagging action, up for less. Ribbon tails are not curl tails, they swim the same rigged either way.

Tom

PS, do you wonder how we made anything before CNC equipment, it's was called highly skilled machinists making precision parts for good engineering drawings.

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You missed three bites while pondering this. :P

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You missed three bites while pondering this. :P

Dagnabbit.

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Overthinking…

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Overthinking…

Thats how I compensate for my short-term memory loss. 

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