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Hello,

I've made my previous frog rod (MH/F Daiwa) into a spinnerbait rod as it fits that role better.

I'm looking for a dedicated frog rod, and I'm wondering if there's any reason to spend extra money for a sensitive rod.  It seems to me that I've never used feel as a primary hook-set trigger when fishing topwater anything

Is there any reason not to just buy a H/F Ugly Stik or H/F Cherrywood for dedicated frog use?

Regards,

Josh

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For a dedicated frog I look at tip action first.  It needs to enough tip to work and walk a frog and then a nice strong back bone to set the hooks and get them out of nasty stuff.  Sensitivity isn't necessary but I do like a lighter rod if possible.  I don't have a dedicated frog rod though.  I have 2 rods that double as punching and jig rods so sensitivity is important for me.

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Sensitivity is the least of my worries about a frog rod. Everything is visually if you are fishing hollow body and buzz frogs on top. A higher quality rod will be lighter and better balanced so it would feel more comfortable if fishing for an extended period of time.

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1 hour ago, Josh Smith said:

Is there any reason not to just buy a H/F Ugly Stik or H/F Cherrywood for dedicated frog use?

ya, you dont want the ugly stik or cherrywood because its way too heavy and will wear you out after some time of twitching. just get another tatula.

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You something light and strong, heavy power such as the Lew's Custom rod. I bought it for a frog and Carolina rod and pitching. It really does all 3 well.

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15 hours ago, tander said:

You something light and strong, heavy power such as the Lew's Custom rod. I bought it for a frog and Carolina rod and pitching. It really does all 3 well.

I really love my Lews Custom Lite. Used it this morning for the first time and its a beast. Pulled 4 out of milfoil using a frog and had no problem.

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You need a rod with good backbone, but a good tip as well that is going to load properly when casting a frog and be responsive enough to allow you to walk a frog. You don't have to break the bank, but you don't want to just buy any broomstick either. 

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love my old light and tough daiwa frog rod - parabolic and fairly light - loads of power

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A great frog rod has the right amount tip, strong backbone, and light, a parabolic rod would be ideal to handle those surges the fish make at times when nearing the boat.  Price points vary by the angler's budget. 

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23 hours ago, kickerfish1 said:

Sensitivity is the least of my worries about a frog rod. Everything is visually if you are fishing hollow body and buzz frogs on top. A higher quality rod will be lighter and better balanced so it would feel more comfortable if fishing for an extended period of time.

Ditto 

 

Mike 

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If the rod is primarily for frogging, sensitivity isn't as paramount. However, I did basically the same thing, and ended up using my frogging rod as a heavy cover jig rod, where sensitivity IS important. If you spend a decent few bucks though it'll still be sensitive. I have a BPS Carbonlite as my frog rod and I love it.

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