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Dane Morris

HOW TO FIND THE RIGHT SIZE JIG

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Hey guys, first off I am a pretty inexperienced angler and I really want to appreciate all of your guy's help. You guys always respond to my questions and I really appreciate the friendly environment. Anyway, I have seen in many youtube videos jig fishing can be very productive and I was wondering when to use a 1/4 oz jig vs a 3/8 oz. jig and a 1/2 oz. jig. Also, it seems most guys like the black and blue for dark water and green pumpkin for most situations, so if you have any suggestions for me to use as I live in California I would really appreciate it.

Thanks so much for your help guys, I really appreciate it,

Dane

Tight Lines!

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i like a .25 oz swim jig, strike king pro model, will cast on heavier rods if you use a trailer.

I like 3/8 oz war eagle flipping jigs, but that will vary.

.75 oz football head jigs

.5 oz+ All Terrain Tackle grass jig

remember heavier lures fall faster, good in deep water, but will not catch smaller fish, use light wire hooks without braid, heavy gauge with braid.

its really up to you

 

Jigs

Jigs Overview

     There are many types of jigs, and it can get confusing. Typically, jigs look like crayfish. As you know, swim jigs look like baitfish. They are affective allayer long, and can be found on almost any angler's rod who is worth his "two cents" all year round. Especially prominent in the winter and summer months when bass become lethargic, are jigs. Just as one would use different crankbaits in different situations jigs are the same way. Certain jigs strive in certain areas where others do not. 

Jig Types

Football: Ever try to roll a football to your buddy? Chances are it didn't roll straight towards him. Football jigs are designed to roll like them on hard ground. The "wobble" makes it look more realistic. They usually have a horizontal line tie.

Grass: Designed for heavy cover and vegetation, grass jigs are designed to be completely weedless. Usually have a vertical line tie and thick weed guard.

Flipping: Most similar to a Grass jig, these jigs are designed to be placed into thick cover like wood piles. they have a very thick weed guard and line tie will vary.

Skipping: Designed with a flat bottom, these jigs are designed to be skipped into cover with an under-hand cast, similar to the action required to skip a stone. 

Rock: Specifically for not getting wedged in rocks, they have a wide, flat head and will come through rip rap (rocks) with ease.

Shakey: A go-to finesse bait for many anglers, the shakes head is a round jig with a flat bottom. It is designed to stand up. Try a 4-6" finesse worm.

Punching: The most heavy duty jig made, it will come through almost anything. consists of a tungsten or lead cone with a skirt and extra heavy-duty hook.

Swim: A swim jig is built with a hydrodynamic head designed to cut through the water column. Most swim jigs are designed to looked like baitfish. Whether that is shad, perch, bass, or bluegill, all are very affective. Just like a jerkbait, swim jigs can be fished a variety of ways. Experiment with multiple methods to discover the best technique for you. One method is called a straight retrieve. just reel it in consistently to keep it a desired depth. You can also try lifting your rod about a foot and then reeling in the slack. This will create a rise-and-fall action.

Bladed Swim Jigs: Basically a swim jig with a metal blade attached to the jig head. the blade creates vibration when retrieved. Will work well in dirty and clear water.

Jig Tips

Rod: 7'2" MH for MOST applications except heavy-duty stuff. Will work well in 3/8-1oz jigs. longer rod helps with cast distance and hookset.

Reel: Any bait caster with at least 10 pounds of drag will be fine. Slower gear ratios will ensure that you do not reel too fast. Faster gear ratios will help you take in line faster. 

Line: 12-20 pound fluorocarbon is best in clearwater situations. Low stretch and visibility. 15-30 pound braid. Smaller diameter and high strength are positives. When using braided line, be sure to use heavy duty hooks, as it will compliment the no stretch qualities of the line.

Color: Perhaps the most confusing aspect of jig fishing. In clear water, natural colors will work best. Bright and dark colors will be best in stained waters. 

Trailers: Try to match you trailer with your jig color. If you can not, try to match the opposite.

Written on May Fourth, 2016.

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ROF!

Rate Of Fall!

How fast your jig falls through the water column will attract the bass' attention.

Some days they prefer ROF fast while other days they want it slow.

A heavier jig will fall through the water column faster

You can also slow the ROF by adding more skirt material or bulkier trailer.

How do you determine what ROF the bass want on a given day?

Throw it & let the bass tell ya!

Generally most anglers start at 3/8 oz & go up or down.

Name brands: pick one

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What Catt said and I'll add that I'll start with a slow fall in colder water and fast fall in warmer water. I also take into consideration the overall size, or bulk of the jig 'package'  I prefer a compact jig that falls quickly under cold front conditions or in clear water and a bigger profile in overcast and off color conditions as a starting point.

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Rate of fall is, one way or another, everything.  Things that effect rate of fall/presentation that need to be considered are type/thickness of cover, current speed, and depth. 

Thick weeds may require a heavy (1/2-1oz) archy style head to punch through.  Faster current may require more weight to keep the presentation at a specific part of the water column or to work at a certain speed or to maintain a specific drift.  Also, if I'm fishing bedding shallow fish in 4' of water the 1/8 oz Bitsy Bug I'm throwing probably isn't going to cut it later in the season when I'm fishing a rocky point in 15-20' of water and probably want 1/4-1oz to get down to bottom related fish.  

 

Welcome to jig fishing, by the way. It's easily the simplest made needlessly complicated way of fishing on conventional tackle.

 

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19 hours ago, You_Only_Live_Once_Fishing said:

i like a .25 oz swim jig, strike king pro model, will cast on heavier rods if you use a trailer.

I like 3/8 oz war eagle flipping jigs, but that will vary.

.75 oz football head jigs

.5 oz+ All Terrain Tackle grass jig

remember heavier lures fall faster, good in deep water, but will not catch smaller fish, use light wire hooks without braid, heavy gauge with braid.

its really up to you

 

Jigs

Jigs Overview

     There are many types of jigs, and it can get confusing. Typically, jigs look like crayfish. As you know, swim jigs look like baitfish. They are affective allayer long, and can be found on almost any angler's rod who is worth his "two cents" all year round. Especially prominent in the winter and summer months when bass become lethargic, are jigs. Just as one would use different crankbaits in different situations jigs are the same way. Certain jigs strive in certain areas where others do not. 

Jig Types

Football: Ever try to roll a football to your buddy? Chances are it didn't roll straight towards him. Football jigs are designed to roll like them on hard ground. The "wobble" makes it look more realistic. They usually have a horizontal line tie.

Grass: Designed for heavy cover and vegetation, grass jigs are designed to be completely weedless. Usually have a vertical line tie and thick weed guard.

Flipping: Most similar to a Grass jig, these jigs are designed to be placed into thick cover like wood piles. they have a very thick weed guard and line tie will vary.

Skipping: Designed with a flat bottom, these jigs are designed to be skipped into cover with an under-hand cast, similar to the action required to skip a stone. 

Rock: Specifically for not getting wedged in rocks, they have a wide, flat head and will come through rip rap (rocks) with ease.

Shakey: A go-to finesse bait for many anglers, the shakes head is a round jig with a flat bottom. It is designed to stand up. Try a 4-6" finesse worm.

Punching: The most heavy duty jig made, it will come through almost anything. consists of a tungsten or lead cone with a skirt and extra heavy-duty hook.

Swim: A swim jig is built with a hydrodynamic head designed to cut through the water column. Most swim jigs are designed to looked like baitfish. Whether that is shad, perch, bass, or bluegill, all are very affective. Just like a jerkbait, swim jigs can be fished a variety of ways. Experiment with multiple methods to discover the best technique for you. One method is called a straight retrieve. just reel it in consistently to keep it a desired depth. You can also try lifting your rod about a foot and then reeling in the slack. This will create a rise-and-fall action.

Bladed Swim Jigs: Basically a swim jig with a metal blade attached to the jig head. the blade creates vibration when retrieved. Will work well in dirty and clear water.

Jig Tips

Rod: 7'2" MH for MOST applications except heavy-duty stuff. Will work well in 3/8-1oz jigs. longer rod helps with cast distance and hookset.

Reel: Any bait caster with at least 10 pounds of drag will be fine. Slower gear ratios will ensure that you do not reel too fast. Faster gear ratios will help you take in line faster. 

Line: 12-20 pound fluorocarbon is best in clearwater situations. Low stretch and visibility. 15-30 pound braid. Smaller diameter and high strength are positives. When using braided line, be sure to use heavy duty hooks, as it will compliment the no stretch qualities of the line.

Color: Perhaps the most confusing aspect of jig fishing. In clear water, natural colors will work best. Bright and dark colors will be best in stained waters. 

Trailers: Try to match you trailer with your jig color. If you can not, try to match the opposite.

Written on May Fourth, 2016.

 

19 hours ago, Catt said:

ROF!

Rate Of Fall!

How fast your jig falls through the water column will attract the bass' attention.

Some days they prefer ROF fast while other days they want it slow.

A heavier jig will fall through the water column faster

You can also slow the ROF by adding more skirt material or bulkier trailer.

How do you determine what ROF the bass want on a given day?

Throw it & let the bass tell ya!

Generally most anglers start at 3/8 oz & go up or down.

Name brands: pick one

 

18 hours ago, papajoe222 said:

What Catt said and I'll add that I'll start with a slow fall in colder water and fast fall in warmer water. I also take into consideration the overall size, or bulk of the jig 'package'  I prefer a compact jig that falls quickly under cold front conditions or in clear water and a bigger profile in overcast and off color conditions as a starting point.

 

18 hours ago, Turkey sandwich said:

Rate of fall is, one way or another, everything.  Things that effect rate of fall/presentation that need to be considered are type/thickness of cover, current speed, and depth. 

Thick weeds may require a heavy (1/2-1oz) archy style head to punch through.  Faster current may require more weight to keep the presentation at a specific part of the water column or to work at a certain speed or to maintain a specific drift.  Also, if I'm fishing bedding shallow fish in 4' of water the 1/8 oz Bitsy Bug I'm throwing probably isn't going to cut it later in the season when I'm fishing a rocky point in 15-20' of water and probably want 1/4-1oz to get down to bottom related fish.  

 

Welcome to jig fishing, by the way. It's easily the simplest made needlessly complicated way of fishing on conventional tackle.

 

Thanks guys

Tight Lines!

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I use a 3/8th's jig for just about everything. 

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I use a 3/8 75% of the time

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1 minute ago, Jon G said:

I use a 3/8 75% of the time

It's the best size, just upsize or downsize your trailer. Get em in a small hook and one with a bigger hook and you're set. 

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Having bass fished with jigs longer than anyone else on this forum and live in Southern California the most important feature for any jig is the hook used to make it. I agree with Catts write up, rate of fall is important......as long as you keep in touch with the jig.

The football jig started in SoCal for good reason,deep rocky structures lakes where it excels, start with a football jig. Colors change seasonally, the most popular combination in SoCal is now known as peanut butter and jelly; brown/purple. Black/blue works better at night or during winter in SoCal. 

The easiest to use and one of the most effective in our local lakes is a plain painted football jig with GYCB double tail Hula grub in cinnamon brown with black/purple flakes. Start with 3/8 & 1/2 oz FB using either Mustad Ultra, Owner or Gamakatsu 4/0 hook.

Good luck

Tom

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I like to call myself a jig guy. Its the lure I use 90% of the time and I have varying opinions. While I understand what Catt is saying about ROF the most important factor for me is to maintain a feel for the bottom, and I do this by changing weights. If the water never moved and the wind didn't blow I would only throw 1/4 ounce jigs, I only up weight when these factors cause me to not feel the jig as it moves across the bottom or brush. The other major factor for me is matching the color to the craws in my area. There are exceptions but for example right now in my area they are brown/reddish orange and anything with red or orange is getting slammed even by inactive fish.

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50+ years fishing jigs for bass, I think I can challenge Catt for that 'longer than anyone else on the forum. Then again, I know I can't challenge his productivity over the years. ?

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7 hours ago, papajoe222 said:

50+ years fishing jigs for bass, I think I can challenge Catt for that 'longer than anyone else on the forum. Then again, I know I can't challenge his productivity over the years. ?

 

On July 28, 2016 at 9:04 PM, riverbasser said:

I like to call myself a jig guy. Its the lure I use 90% of the time and I have varying opinions. While I understand what Catt is saying about ROF the most important factor for me is to maintain a feel for the bottom, and I do this by changing weights. If the water never moved and the wind didn't blow I would only throw 1/4 ounce jigs, I only up weight when these factors cause me to not feel the jig as it moves across the bottom or brush. The other major factor for me is matching the color to the craws in my area. There are exceptions but for example right now in my area they are brown/reddish orange and anything with red or orange is getting slammed even by inactive fish.

 

On July 28, 2016 at 8:24 PM, WRB said:

Having bass fished with jigs longer than anyone else on this forum and live in Southern California the most important feature for any jig is the hook used to make it. I agree with Catts write up, rate of fall is important......as long as you keep in touch with the jig.

The football jig started in SoCal for good reason,deep rocky structures lakes where it excels, start with a football jig. Colors change seasonally, the most popular combination in SoCal is now known as peanut butter and jelly; brown/purple. Black/blue works better at night or during winter in SoCal. 

The easiest to use and one of the most effective in our local lakes is a plain painted football jig with GYCB double tail Hula grub in cinnamon brown with black/purple flakes. Start with 3/8 & 1/2 oz FB using either Mustad Ultra, Owner or Gamakatsu 4/0 hook.

Good luck

Tom

 

On July 28, 2016 at 5:50 PM, OK Bass Hunter said:

It's the best size, just upsize or downsize your trailer. Get em in a small hook and one with a bigger hook and you're set. 

 

On July 28, 2016 at 5:47 PM, Jon G said:

I use a 3/8 75% of the time

 

On July 28, 2016 at 5:43 PM, OK Bass Hunter said:

I use a 3/8th's jig for just about everything. 

Thanks for the tips guys, really appreciate the help!

Tight Lines!

 

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Basically get jigs in various weights and same colors in each size. Don't have to get complicated with colors. Like Catt said. Let the fish tell you what they want. Start off what you think is right and make adjustments from there. Sometimes when they're tight to cover(in the middle of brush) you might do better with a heavier jig to get through the small branches and reach them easier even if it's only a few feet deep. For example fishing buck brush in 3-5 ft water, 3/8 oz might fall through the exposed brush and get a few bites but a lot of times when there really deep and tight to the center, a 1/2 or 3/4 oz jig gets on the inside much better and produce way more bites. 

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12 hours ago, papajoe222 said:

50+ years fishing jigs for bass, I think I can challenge Catt for that 'longer than anyone else on the forum. Then again, I know I can't challenge his productivity over the years. ?

Ya saying we both in the old farts fishing club?

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Go to Walmart, get a Strike King Bitsy Bug Jig in black and blue for 1.99$ then go get a pack of BABY rage craws in black and blue. Get a MH Spinningrod and throw the hell out of it at structure. This will be a huge numbers bite lure. You'll have a blast, then slowly try adding weight to see what situations you get bit on with heavier lures.

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6 hours ago, Catt said:

Ya saying we both in the old farts fishing club?

Your are both Jr members!

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7 hours ago, Catt said:

Ya saying we both in the old farts fishing club?

Team Depends vs. Team Pampers

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