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Hey guys new to the fourm and I have recently been researching fishing kayaks. I have been fresh and salt water fishing all my life and I recently got to use my buddies 12ft kayak to get around to a few of my favorite spots and I loved it because of the accessability. I have recently been looking at the Ascend FS128T and the Native propel 10ft pedal kayak. What's are yalls thoughts? I want comfort and the most out of my kayak.

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37 minutes ago, Bighk23@yahoo.com said:

I want comfort and the most out of my kayak.

Get some quality seat time in as many boats as possible, and go big.  A ten-footer is not ever on my radar, unless it's for a youngster.  My boats are twelve and fourteen feet long.  Also, while a good paddle is not a must have, it's nice.  What makes a nice paddle better is proper technique.  You can learn a lot watching videos, but a couple on the water classes from an instructor will really jump start your paddling technique.  I used to teach fishing kayak classes, and my main motto: do not wear yourself out paddling.  Save that for the fish!

Good luck in your search!

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Tailor your kayak choice to the type of water you fish 90% of the time. Propulsion is a good place to start (pedal power, paddle power, electric motor power).

For the areas I like to fish, paddle power is the way to go as heavy weed growth, laydowns and other underwater obstructions render pedal (or electric) propellers useless.

What types of water will you be fishing?

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I mainly fish small lakes and ponds. I have the Neuse river to fish in and I live close to the ICW. So would like to use in Ocean if I needed to to get on schooling redfish or flounder fishing. I love sit on top kayaks. That's the main goal and I want to be able to stand up.

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You're definitely gonna want a SOT.  And I would go at least twelve feet.  My personal recommendation would be an Atak 120 or 140.

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I own a Ride 115x and love it.  Of course I bought it and then the Atak came out.   Might have went Atak if I didn't already bite the bullet on my Ride.

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The Ride series is an exceptional boat, as well.  It's also a bit less pricey.  That it's lasted this long with only minor changes over the years is testament to it's good design.

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Welcome aboard!

Native makes excellent kayaks, so does Wilderness
Systems, Hobie, FeelFree, Jackson, Ocean Kayak, 
and many more.

I'm not sponsored by any kayak company and I've
sat in quite a few boats. I settled on the Native Ultimate
12 because, for me, it felt better than the Wilderness
Systems Commander. Both are hybrid kayaks. I have
not been disappointed in all the years I've owned it.

Your best bet is to go to a kayak store and demo as 
many as you can -- of those you're interested in.

Reviews and recommendations are one thing, but 
they are subjective. Only you can determine what will
fit best for you.

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Another big concern is staying comfortable.  An uncomfortable kayak with a lousy seat or lack of space can feel very cumbersome.  In most water, I also suggest at least an 11.5' boat with deck space and an adjustable seat.  I'm recovering from back surgery last year and still have back and neck issues, so the seat and space on a Feel free Lure 13.5 closed the deal for me.  They are big and not the fastest/most maneuverable boats, but they will be releasing a plug in pedal/electric drive any time now.  Bulky boats also tend to have rudder kits that make a great investment.  Tracking straight and fast eliminates a lot of fatigue. 

 

Another consideration is transportation.  Big boats like the Lure, ATAK, Jackson Big Rig, etc all range from extremely difficult to impossible to load car top on your own.   

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I have used a Vibe Sea Ghost and those are very nice for the price. I bought a Pescador Pro 100 (at a GREAT price) and used it for a few weeks in some small tanks and it worked perfect. I am selling it tomorrow actually. I am holding off on getting a new one until the Pescador Pilot comes out and I think that is what I am going to go with. Im sure I will change my mind 100 times before it comes out though. 

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Test, test, test.  Get in as many boats as you can... You can (and will) adjust to anything, but you'll see/feel differences between each kayak you sit in. Get on the water in as many as you can and see what 'feels' right to you.

I have a Ride 115 and love it (though I'll admit to a little jealousy when I look at the new boats). If I were buying now, the only thing I'd change is going for a longer boat.  If I was on a budget I'd be looking hard at the Ride 135, or I'd be looking at the ATAK 140 if price was no object. Get as long/big as you can meaningfully handle...

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If you want to keep the budget under $1000 check out the perception 12.0 pro. I picked one up on Labor Day and am really impressed with it.

The seat is like a nice beach chair and if you have average balance you can stand and fish in calm water or just stand to stretch in choppy conditions. It is drilled for a Lorance transducer, but with a little bit of creativity you can make  transducer brackets from other companies fit. There is a compartment to store your battery and gear tracks to mount your display. It runs about $830 which will leave you some extra cash for a carbon paddle. 

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Id suggest the Jackson Coosa HD.  This will be my next Kayak by this spring. I would suggest any Kayak with the lawn chair type seat. The main reason I am upgrading my feelfree moken to the coosa HD.  Love the feelfree but my butt cant take long hours in that reg kayak style seat. Most important aspect of a Kayak is the SEAT in my opinion! 

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I went the craigslist route, you can find package deals when people are either getting out of the sport or upgrading.

Wilderness Systems are nice, I have the Ride 135 and love it. I have stood in it, but don't have my sea-legs for that yet and there are so many stumps in my lake I would be afraid to drift into one while fishing and fall in the drinnk.  

I also agree with previous posts on the seat.  I have an Airpro seat.. These have low, high and even recline positions and I could fish out of them all day without aches.

Also the rudder is worth repeating, Many times the wind is behind me I can fish an entire shoreline without touching the paddle, just the foot controls.

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I'm a kayak guy here too and all the above are great advice to anyone getting into kayaking. My only addition would somewhat go against other conventions. 

I fish mostly small ponds and streams, often areas where I have to carry my kayak quite a ways to get there. For that reason, I chose a 9-10ft kayak because they were so much lighter and easy to maneuver in a small pond with tight spots.

By time you add seats, rod holders, all your gear, PFD, etc. you have enough to carry, I didn't want to lug around a 100+lb kayak or have to worry about also having a cart to bring around for it all. After all, I bought it to get back to those out-of-the-way places no one can get a bass boat to. Not a problem for everyone, but I knew I would want something light. 

I use a Vibe Skipjack 90. Their bigger one is the Sea Ghost and gets a lot of great reviews, and the customer service is outstanding.

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I would suggest something bigger than a 10ft....

Having owned a few lil yaks I can attest that they are really only good for ponds when compared to my Ride, OK or ATAK...

Its easier to use a 14 ft boat in a pond than it is to use a 10ft on larger water.

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I found one at a winter clearance sale and bought it before I'd paddled anything other than rental sit-in.  If willing to wait a bit, you may get a great deal Nov-Jan.

I bought a Wilderness Tarpon 100 and as others above have said, it isn't near as fast or roomy as my friends' big Jacksons, Wildys and Hobies.  However, I don't regret getting a 10 footer for a second.  I've got a lot of hours in it - couple times a week for two years.   I do all day floats with a single short stand break and it is more than comfortable enough.  It tracks fine and has more than enough room for day trips.  But the biggest thing I like about my 10 footer is that I can carry it a good distance, if need be; and I have NO trouble getting it on and off my Durango.  I would not want anything heavier.  It is perfect for ponds and rivers; and does very well on big waters like Potomac and Chesapeake Bay.  I can't keep up with the 14 footers when they are really motoring, but I hold my own most of the time.

   I also, respectfully, take issue with recommendations on paddles.  I have NO WHERE near J Francho's experience, but I have found I have little need for a better paddle.  I got a Harmony free with my yak - one that retails for about $70.  Having wondered what I was missing, I've used friends' $500 Werners and $300 Bending Branches and while, they are better....the margin of 'betterness' is nowhere near worth the premium price to me.....take that for what its worth from a relative newbie

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I used to say the same about paddles, and even after borrowing high end paddles, I felt I'd rather buy something else.  However, I caved and got an AT Oracle Ergo shaft, full carbon fiber.  After a few days, and dialing in the right offset for me, I'll NEVER go back.  I'm a "no effort" paddler, and prefer to save my energy for catching fish, and this paddle puts it all to the water.  If you're what I call a "slasher and a splasher," then I'd recommend a fiberglass shaft.  It has a little give for the guys that like to work at it.

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i highly recommend the pelican catch 120. not the fastest but super stable (bought it specifically to stand up and fish) and the seat is great. i paid under $800

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