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Ghostshad

Motor Trim

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I have a 1999 Johnson 225 HO , with carburators ,my boat is extremely hard to start , does how you trim your motor up & down have anything to do with how it starts ? I have my motor trimed about level i'm at home so level is the best i can do. I pump my bulb to firm,not to hard to over do, i turn my key right & push the key in several times & try to start it.I keep going over & over untill it starts, it took me about 15 minutes to start it today. Here's the thing,once it starts you can turn it on &off over & over & it starts first time &every time.Ive been starting it ever day for about 5 days now & it don't seen to help.I guess it needs a good hard run but i had back surgery 5 weeks ago, i don't want a take a chance on hurting my back putting it on the water. Thanks for any ideals & help.  GodBless & Thanks

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First, understand how your systems works.  There is no choke, when you press the key in, you are energizing the solenoid on the fuel enrichment valve.  This valve is what puts gas in the cylinders to prime them for cold starts.   For this to valve to work, the fuel has to be under pressure, it  does not pump fuel into the cylinders. 

There are only two ways to develop fuel pressure, the fuel pump or the primer bulb.  For the fuel pump to pump fuel, the motor has to be cranking/running.  Each time the pistons come down in a two stroke motor, from top dead center, they create pressure in the crankcase.  A hose goes from one cylinder to the fuel pump so that pressure will press the diaphragm in the fuel pump to pulse it each stroke.  So, if the pistons are not going up and down, the fuel pump is making no fuel pressure.  What this means is, when you press the key in you are only going to be giving it  a very small shot of gas for what little bit of pressure the systems happens to be holding, and that ain't much.  

When you pump it up with the primer bulb, the only fuel it's going to release into the engine is just what it takes for the pressure to drop to zero, and again, that ain't much.  Plus if you are not pumping it up until it's firm, It's probably closer to none at all.

Here's a couple of suggestions to try.  If you have someone with you, pump the primer bulb until firm, then  turn the key switch to the on position, not cranking it, then press and hold the key in.  While holding the key in, squeeze the primer bulb four or five more times.  Wait about 10 seconds for that fuel to form vapors,  Then try starting the motor.  If it doesn't start quickly, repeat  the holding the key and squeezing the primer bulb.

Since you would have to be the Stretch or have arms about 6' long, the only way you could do the primer bulb thing is to take the cover off and flip the red arm on the primer solenoid up to manual prime.  With a bad back, that's not much of an option. 

So, if by yourself, pump the primer up until firm.  Now, when you are cranking it, hold the key in and don't let release for at least 5-8 seconds.  Then if it didn't start, stop cranking, turn the key off, wait 10 seconds, for the fuel in the motor to develop plenty of fumes.  The try cranking it without holding the key in.  If it doesn't start, repeat and hold key in about four-five seconds.

That motor has a big crankcase and after it sits several weeks and all the fuel has evaporated, it takes an extra lot to get it going again. 

Now, I have had power packs that would do this same thing.  Let them sit for several days and they would not fire until they had totally frustrated you trying to get it started.

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That answer right there is why this the best bass site on the web.

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Agree 100 %    Way2Slow Should i have the same problem starting it every day even if i let it run at home every day ? I ran it 5 days in a row for maybe 10 minutes & Sat was the hardest day i had starting it, but it always starts . Gonna try what You wrote me above. No way i can thank you for all Your Help.  GodBless & Thanks a Million

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23 hours ago, Way2slow said:

 

So, if by yourself, pump the primer up until firm.  Now, when you are cranking it, hold the key in and don't let release for at least 5-8 seconds.  Then if it didn't start, stop cranking, turn the key off, wait 10 seconds, for the fuel in the motor to develop plenty of fumes.  The try cranking it without holding the key in.  If it doesn't start, repeat and hold key in about four-five seconds.

That motor has a big crankcase and after it sits several weeks and all the fuel has evaporated, it takes an extra lot to get it going again. 

Now, I have had power packs that would do this same thing.  Let them sit for several days and they would not fire until they had totally frustrated you trying to get it started.

This is how I crank my 1997 90HP Johnson. Try it, it works. Great advise Way2slow.

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I think totally ticked is the Proper word . GodBless & Thanks to Everybody

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I've got a 97 Evinrude 130 and to start it for the first time that day, when you turn the key you just push it in and hold it until it starts. Give that a shot instead of just tapping it a few times. If that doesn't work, move onto what Way2slow said to try as he's a guru with those motors.

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