GlenInBossTown

Need Early Spring N.E. Tips

12 posts in this topic

Hi All-

 

I'm a bit of a noob here. I've been living right on a small lake in Massachusetts for a few years now and have had a bit of success, routinely catching 2-6# largemouth bass an occasional pickerel and various panfish each year. But when it comes to the bass, I've only caught them on soft, Texas-rigged plastics. No luck with frogs, spin or buzz baits, etc. The lake is 585 acres and is very shallow, with an average depth of 9' and a max depth of 13'. We get a LOT of algae do to runoff from the local cranberry bogs. In fact, the first year I was there, the lake was closed to swimming for a month because the algae grew to toxic levels. The town has been doing some things with the dam and water treatment and it should be better this year. I literally walk off my back porch to the private beach, so for all of its flaws, it's a pretty sweet spot. I've got a 12' boat with a small outboard. 

 

In any event, I can't wait for the weather to warm and get out on the lake. If anyone has any suggestions for how I can expand my tools and techniques, especially as the water comes up from near-freezing in the next few weeks. I generally stay away from live bait. I watch a lot of YouTube videos, but they are mostly from other parts of the country and in different types of water. What's a good way to start to broaden my skills?

 

Thanks, 

 

Glen

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Given your access, I would spend a few days exclusively with cranks and really learn them....it will pay off in the long run

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A hard jerkbait will be my main bait from ice-out up to around 50-52 degree water. I'd also play with a red craw lipless bait. And the jerkbait will not be worked like you see in most of the vids and on TV where the water is warmer. It will involve long pauses with a few twitches in between. Very little movement to it.

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I would use a jig and pig. Cast it out and drag it back painfully slow. It'll get you on fish. This year I purchased a huddelston setup for throwing big swimbaits that's also and option cast unmm far and deep and slowly reel umm in 

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3 hours ago, MikeOGNR said:

I would use a jig and pig. Cast it out and drag it back painfully slow. It'll get you on fish. This year I purchased a huddelston setup for throwing big swimbaits that's also and option cast unmm far and deep and slowly reel umm in 

This is what I've been doing so far, football jig and a hudd 68. Only been out twice from shore so far since ice out for like 1-2 hours. I got skunked both times though. 

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On 3/16/2017 at 5:14 PM, NHBull said:

Given your access, I would spend a few days exclusively with cranks and really learn them....it will pay off in the long run

i take this approach when learning all new techniques. Bring one set up used strictly for your technique of desire and throw it all day or until your confident. it may take weeks and months but it's the best way to become proficient. I love flipping I'm good in light cover and structure but I'm not there in the thicker stuff. that's my goal this year sensing bites through the gnarliest of cover

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I will echo what others have said, go out with one set up- start with a jerkbait because the waters still cold, and work it till you get it down. The youtube videos might help with how to get started using a specific bait, but  hands on time with it on the water is how your going to learn the different lure techniques. This time of year is can be so frustrating watching those videos of these guys fishing Texas, Florida, California and we still got 30 degrees going on. 

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I'll just wish you a warm welcome to the forums, Glen!

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Try a blade bait as they are cheap and work.  The red rattle trap and a deep jerkbait like a stayee 90 or a kvd deep.  Pull don't jerkbaits in 30-40 degree water.  Pick up two one in a solid color and one clear like ghost minnow.  If you have to have a third get a reflective one with silver or gold.  Later they will move up but start deep on the primary points and main lake structure 

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17 hours ago, MassYak85 said:

This is what I've been doing so far, football jig and a hudd 68. Only been out twice from shore so far since ice out for like 1-2 hours. I got skunked both times though. 

Yea this will be my first year with hudds. Pretty siked to see them in action though. Gonna exclusively throw them all year to get on a pig I may go fish less, but when I do link up with a bite I know it'll be a giant. 

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I'm an ice out fisherman, My favorite time to go is within a week or two of ice out. Most of my big bass come this time of year, I've actually been on lakes when half of the lake is still iced over. My favorite spring lures are jigs, square bill cranks, 8-9ft cranks, chatter baits and suspending jerk baits. I find that the most important thing to do is idle around the lake and look for the warmest water temp on the lake. I also like locating pools in streams or rivers where the water goes from a shallow part and drops into 8ft to 12ft hole. I find bass stacked in these locations and I mean stacked!! My favorite spring lake will produce bass on just about every cast, no joke and I've had days where the average will run from upper 2lb to 4lb with the occasional hog. Always watch your lures on the retrieve, you will see chasers and sometime whole schools of smallmouth will follow, I call them "WOLF PACKS" lol hold your boat position and get ready for a feeding frenzy!!

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I would start with a jerkbait. Remember to pause longer when the water is colder. Also I think you have a polar bear swimming up to you house from the lake in that first picture. 

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