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thinkingredneck

rod selection for kayak

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I fish from a kayak.  That limits me to 2 rods, ideally, as that is how many rod holders I have behind me.  To carry more gets awkward, and anything that sticks out  in front of me, like a rod lying down or in a front rod holder, can cause a wrapped line and lost fish.  Don't ask how I know this. I read the "rod selection, the basics" thread and it helped a lot in clarifying my thoughts concerning rod selection.    I mostly fish a relatively  shallow, heavily stained to muddy reservoir with a lot of pads, wood and other vegetation.  Currently, my primary rod is a mh bait caster fast rod with 65lb test braid and 15 lb yozuri hybrid leader--when I use a leader.   I also have a medium baitcaster that I have 12lb fluro on and a medium spinning rod with 25 lb braid plus leader.  I use the  mh rod for single hook baits and toads.  I am comfortable with worm fishing, but don't have a lot of knowledge or confidence in "reaction" baits, other than toads.   If I were limited to one of the other rods for treble hook lures, and or soft swimbaits, which rod would you suggest?  I appreciate any advice.

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I posed this similar question a couple of months ago (3 rods instead of 2 on a kayak). I would take the spinning rod but spool it with 10# braid. That would give you a larger variance of weights/lures to use. It also, depending on whether you use a RH or LH baitcaster, would allow you to switch reeling hands- which I find beneficial during a long day on the water.

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I have a setup for every conceivable presentation in bass fishing. I never take them all with me on an outing, rather I anticipate conditions, season, location etc and take the two I'll fish that day. If I'm unsure I have one or two extra in the vehicle so I can swap out. 

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I might be different than most. I only take 3 rods; heavy, MH and spinning rod. no matter what lure I decide to use, I will tie it on to one of the three. I've read and done enough kayak fishing to know that one rod can handle multiple techniques. 

For example; my heavy can handle swimbaits, frogging, t-rig creatures for flipping/pitching and any heavy lure.  My MH does almost everything else including buzz, t-rig worm, t-rig for cover, crank baits and so on. Spinning does senkos, small swimbaits, poppers and so on. Is it perfect? nope. But, I catch fish and fish don't care about our rods, they want to eat. 

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Uh, hmmm, uh, your oldest and most expendable one(s).

 

What goes up must come down and one goes out on a kayak might not come back in on a kayak.

 

 

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I will generally carry 3 of the following MH casting, M casting, M spinning,  and ML spinning.  Depending on line type for the casting I can get multiple presentations out of 1 rod.

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I think my setup would work well for you. #1) MH/F casting, either with 30# or 40# braid (although I have 50# on mine currently) or 15-17lb mono. #2) M/F spinning, 20# braid to avoid line twist and add a 8lb fluro leader as necessary. I can throw smaller baits and crankbaits on the spinning rod as well as using it for finesse techniques. Ideally, I'd add a casting rod for cranking, but on a budget it works.

 

Also find something that is cheap, in the event you should lose it.

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Thanks, I have been using my mh baitcaster for worms, jigs, and frogs.  My spinner for treble hooks and weightless worms/ finesse, but sometimes I like the medium BC rod with mono or fluro for cranks, spinners and weightless plastics.  I think I just like BC rods better as I have more accuracy with them.

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17 hours ago, thinkingredneck said:

I fish from a kayak.  That limits me to 2 rods, ideally, as that is how many rod holders I have behind me.  To carry more gets awkward, and anything that sticks out  in front of me, like a rod lying down or in a front rod holder, can cause a wrapped line and lost fish.  Don't ask how I know this. I read the "rod selection, the basics" thread and it helped a lot in clarifying my thoughts concerning rod selection.    I mostly fish a relatively  shallow, heavily stained to muddy reservoir with a lot of pads, wood and other vegetation.  Currently, my primary rod is a mh bait caster fast rod with 65lb test braid and 15 lb yozuri hybrid leader--when I use a leader.   I also have a medium baitcaster that I have 12lb fluro on and a medium spinning rod with 25 lb braid plus leader.  I use the  mh rod for single hook baits and toads.  I am comfortable with worm fishing, but don't have a lot of knowledge or confidence in "reaction" baits, other than toads.   If I were limited to one of the other rods for treble hook lures, and or soft swimbaits, which rod would you suggest?  I appreciate any advice.

I have a crate that I zip-tied some more rod holders in that I carry in the rear well. My kayak has bungee cord over the rear well so I hold it down with those. I can now carry up to 7 rods. I usually carry at least 6 for bass. I'll sometimes throw in a light spin combo for places with very small bass or good panfish.

 

If there's a dock nearby I'll leave the combos I might not use on the dock. If I need them I'll go get them.

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12 hours ago, 3crows said:

What goes up must come down and one goes out on a kayak might not come back in on a kayak.

 

8 hours ago, Boomstick said:

Also find something that is cheap, in the event you should lose it.

 Just take about 6-8" of copper water pipe insulation, (the small diameter grey stuff that comes in 6' lengths at home improvement stores) and place it above the grip in front of your reel on your spinning rod or on the split grip part of your casting rod behind the reel.  This is a low cost way to fish without worrying about losing your gear.

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9 hours ago, Boomstick said:

Also find something that is cheap, in the event you should lose it.

 

Actually, my full cork grip Avids and full rear cork Dobyns float.  So, in that case, the added expense pays off, should you drop one.

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1 hour ago, RichPenNY said:

 

 Just take about 6-8" of copper water pipe insulation, (the small diameter grey stuff that comes in 6' lengths at home improvement stores) and place it above the grip in front of your reel on your spinning rod or on the split grip part of your casting rod behind the reel.  This is a low cost way to fish without worrying about losing your gear.

I didn't mean that cheap lol

31 minutes ago, J Francho said:

 

Actually, my full cork grip Avids and full rear cork Dobyns float.  So, in that case, the added expense pays off, should you drop one.

 

Well that's a pretty sweet then!

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As long as the reel is less than 8 oz., which most are these days, they stay at the surface.  Now my split grip G. Loomis....uh, yeah that spent a week at the bottom the lake.  I did get it back with a snagging hook.

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Huh, I have never tried to see if my combos float or sink, I guess I just assumed the weight of the reel would drag even a full cork rod down.  I hate dealing with rod floats, if I can get full cork rods to float then my entire kayak arsenal might have to be rethought.  

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I found out by accident, lol.

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I habe contributed one rod and reel to the rez

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16 minutes ago, J Francho said:

I found out by accident, lol.

 

That must have been an emotional rollercoaster for a few seconds there.  

 

OP, my main concern for kayak rods is a short butt section.  I don't stand to cast and always wear a PFD, so longer butts really get in the way with casting and general rod handling.  I also like shorter rods as I can move about overhead cover with less hassle with my rods stored vertically.  I don't care so much about casting distance as I can just drift over closer to my target.  I limit myself to four combos, but rarely use more than two of them.  

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1 hour ago, Bunnielab said:

That must have been an emotional rollercoaster for a few seconds there.

 

Off topic, but yeah.  Nearly had a hearty attack.  7' Medium Mod Avid with a Daiwa Alphas R, spooled with Tatsu, and a $25 JDM crankbait tied on.

 

"Oh no!!!! ...........Wait, that thing floats?  Phew."

 

More related, I get the short rear grip thing, though wearing an inflatable helps, and I mostly stand.  Even sitting, I have a Commander 140, and the perch helps.

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11 hours ago, Boomstick said:
12 hours ago, RichPenNY said:

 

 Just take about 6-8" of copper water pipe insulation, (the small diameter grey stuff that comes in 6' lengths at home improvement stores) and place it above the grip in front of your reel on your spinning rod or on the split grip part of your casting rod behind the reel.  This is a low cost way to fish without worrying about losing your gear.

I didn't mean that cheap lol

You may laugh - even out loud if you want.  I won't take offense.  I was just offering a practical solution that I know works.  I have relatively inexpensive stuff - rods like Abu Veritas and SC Mojo, with Pflueger reels.  Several years ago I lost 3 rigs when I dumped my kayak. Even though that stuff was less expensive than what I'm currently using; it was a terrible experience.

 

By using the foam insulation (and it doesn't take a very long piece), I don't worry if something slips into the water; which it has a few times.  I can just reach in and grab it because it floats.  Hopefully my suggestion will help someone, and save them a rod and reel combo.

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2 hours ago, RichPenNY said:

You may laugh - even out loud if you want.  I won't take offense.  I was just offering a practical solution that I know works.  I have relatively inexpensive stuff - rods like Abu Veritas and SC Mojo, with Pflueger reels.  Several years ago I lost 3 rigs when I dumped my kayak. Even though that stuff was less expensive than what I'm currently using; it was a terrible experience.

 

By using the foam insulation (and it doesn't take a very long piece), I don't worry if something slips into the water; which it has a few times.  I can just reach in and grab it because it floats.  Hopefully my suggestion will help someone, and save them a rod and reel combo.

 

I'm sorry, I totally misread that. I was at work and read it too fast it too fast as a "redneck engineering" type solution aka homemade rod, which wasn't what you were suggesting at all now that I read it again. Foam insulation seems like a good idea though.

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I use homemade leashes on all rods on my kayak. I do unleash the one rod I am using, since I don't like the leash (paracord) when fishing. I've dumped and lost a rod/reel, so lesson learned. I may try to pipe insulation thing however.

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Here is my crate. I have consolidated the lure selection and made room for my anchor and other items, but you get the point. I carry 6 rods though b/c I hate to retie.  

15781283_1275948465805508_6762330881015609626_n.jpg

15826077_1275975599136128_3451943541131201392_n.jpg

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Nice.  The eagle talon has a rear space that is too narow for a standard milk crate.  I did mount three rod holders to a cooler.   Thanks for the idea.

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@Bunnielab: I have a hassle with longer butts on rods since I fish from a sit-in kayak.  I found that Manley rods with an adjustable butt have made my life easier. Very quick and easy to extend and retract as required. Just mentioning this in case you are interested. Great customer service if you have questions. I'm hoping to replace a couple more rods since anything with over a ten-inch butt is an accident waiting to happen in my situation. 

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I have also gone with shorter butt rods.  I don't stand in my kayak, either.  I mostly use a St Croix MF BC rod.  I also have a couple BPS tourney special, one M and one Heavy. I have an Abu spinning rod with a handle that is too long.  A Fenwick that is a tad long.  I am embarassed to admit it, but I am having good luck using an Ugly stick spinning rod, medium.  Fun to use. The older I get, the less trendy I am.

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