Jump to content
Flow Master

Rebel Micro Critters and Critter Classics

Recommended Posts

Starting to get back into fishing after decades of not. My 5 year old wants to start fishing and I saw these little lures at Wally World at such a cheap price I thought I would try them (4 pack Classics $7.00). The miro's are 1/16 weight. The classics don't list the weight but looks to be the same as the miro are a tad heavier. My question is what would be the best rod/reel combo to fish these and how should the be tyed on?

Thanks,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since they are lightweight baits, I think an ultralight spinning rod/reel (for little hands) would work best.  (I disdain spincast gear).  Ordinarily I'd recommend 4 or 6 lb line but for a beginner, 6 or 8 lb monofilament line is better.

 

The palomar knot is easy to tie and it is reliable.  Another good knot (but it's more difficult to tie) is the Rapala knot.  This knot creates a loop which allows small crankbaits to have better action.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not had a lot of luck with the Micro Critters.  It seems like maybe 1 in 3 has any action to it, the bad ones just drag through the water on their sides.  The ones that work do catch a ton of small fish, but I have given up on them.  I have a few of the Strike King Bitsy Minnows that I put barbless single hooks on and they perform much better and still draw a lot of fish.  I buy them in lots on ebay, if you are willing to buy them a dozen at a time you can find them for $2-3 bucks per.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Flow Master said:

The classics don't list the weight but looks to be the same as the miro are a tad heavier. My question is what would be the best rod/reel combo to fish these and how should the be tyed on?

The microcritters have been next to useless for me and are so light they will not be much fun for anyone to throw.

 

Every lure in the classic pack can and will catch small bass, except the tiny Pop-R might be a little less versatile.

 

I'm sure many anglers on this board will recommend different starting lures for 5-year old, but I've been through this recently and if I had to pick one, I'd take a small white curl-tail grub on a light jighead to be my most effective for kids.  Cast, let sink (or not) and wind.  I like the 3-inch Yum grubs for less than $2 a pack at WM.

 

Agree that 6 lb test on spinning is a good choice.  

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the same boat, kind of...my 7 year old son is ready for more than just dipping a bobber and nightcrawler into the water.

 

I had him practice casting on a 6' medium-light/fast spinning rod once a week in the fall so we can target LMB together, and I've stocked up on some mini chatter and spinner baits from Strike King and other simply retrieve lures. I also thought about those rebel mini critters and poppers, but I think they probably take too much skill other than a simple cast and retrieve to be effective.

 

So my list of lures for him are: Mini chatterbaits, mini spinnerbaits, 2.8" keitech paddletails, and some Mepp's spinnerbaits.

 

Honestly I look at the tackle box I put together for him and I think it may be more effective than a lot of my other tackle, haha.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Crickhopper and the Tiny Craw. I've caught a few small bass and some bream on both in a creek near the house. I'll say the Crickhopper doesn't sit level in the water. It leans one way or the other. I also have the Cicada, but haven't caught a thing on it. They don't seem to get any bites on larger waters. I don't have the ones with single hooks and the trebles are too tiny for fish of any size. I find the inline spinner to be the best smallish bass bait of all time. JMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 to 6 year olds don't have the hand eye skill or attention span to accurately cast light weight lures.

My son started off using a ultra light 5'rod with Zebco Omega trigger spin reel that allowed him to use 2 hands to cast. The rig that worked best was a split shot rig with 3" reapers on a size 1 worm hook. Doesn't snag often and catches bass.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2lb and 4lb line get the best results with these

Like what was said hard to cast for youngins. More fun and less hassle with a t rigged 4 inch worm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Flow Master said:

How about using the 3” grubs?

Take a look at Don Iovino Baits, 3" reapers, 3" tiny meanies, 3" grubs, 4" worms.

Roboworms 4 1/2" curl tail or any other brand.

Keep it simple, your kid just wants to fish and catch a few.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Flow Master said:

How about using the 3” grubs?

In my experience, small grubs are one of the simplest, most effective lures for small bass.  They cost about $1.50 for YUM brand in a small red pack available in just about every Walmart in North America.  You can find small jigs nearby in the store.  

 

I have a little 6 year old girl who has zero problem casting and retrieving this type of jig, casting to targets, and catching bass.  I have a boy who I started with basic cast-and-retrieve lures at the age of 5.

 

I take kids fishing every few weeks, and every few days in the summer.  I love teaching kids.  I've found much depends on the kid, how motivated they are, how much sleep they've had, and how much sleep YOU'VE had.  

 

A lot of different things can work, and you will get lots of very different suggestions here than can and will work.

 

The easiest and most effective for me has been a pack of live worms, and size 1-2 hooks and a small bobber.  

 

But using lures has advantages too.  The key advantage is that you can have them on hand to use when you are ready.  In my world, 20 minutes is a lot of time to spend getting ready with a little kid, so if you can reduce that time to 5 mins to tie a knot and cast the lure and get going, you're better off. 

 

I also find that you have to put their fishing at the top of the priority list, which means you won't do a lot of fishing yourself.  Don't expect to get much fishing of your own in, at least the first several times out.  But the time you put in now will pay off in terms of your fishing buddy gaining self-sufficiency a year or two from now.  You have to take the long view. 

 

I also agree with the guys who suggested a small plastic worm with a bullet sinker, or a split shot, or just no sinker at all.  The great advantage is they get snagged much less often that other baits, when Texas rigged.  In fact, I could be convinced this is the best lure option, and because it is "weedless" a better option than my original jig suggestion.

 

If I were there standing in Walmart looking at the vast array of stuff, I'd pick out a pack of Zoom U-tale worms (or two or three), in the colors your kid likes (green pumpkin or watermelon or junebug are good ideas, but honestly just pick something), and then a pack of Gamakatsu EWG or worm hooks in size 1/0.  Worms about $2-3/pack, hooks in the same range.  If they happen to sell 4" Roboworms, those are also a great choice, but not as common in my experience.

 

Only a few years ago, I had never fished with plastic lures myself.  Now, I teach kids to use them all the time; they are as easy and as effective as can be.

 

I'd also grab a pack of Gulp brand "pinched crawlers" or minnows to put on a small hook, with or without a small bobber and/or a small spilt shot. They aren't much to look at, but they attract small bass and bluegills and catfish as effectively as real worms in many instances. 

 

I'd spend about $15-20 in there if it was me.  

 

The disadvantage of cast-and-crank lures, and any lure with treble hooks is that they will get snagged, especially with kids, and they can get frustrated and potentially sad when they lose their fancy lures.  In retrospect, I'd say leave the little Rebel lures where they are, or get them and save them for later.  Cast-and-crank lures can and will be effective for kids, it just helps if they spend a little time learning the basics of casting first, and also if you can figure out where the main snags are at your fishing spots.

 

As others have said, the main goal is for them to catch something.  The more luck they have the more eager they will be to go with you the next time.

 

Other effective hard baits include Rebel and Rapala minnows, and small Strike King crankbaits.  If your Walmart has them, the various Cotton Cordell lures they sell for $1-2 on the bottom shelf work great for small bass and other species.

 

You will get a whole range of reactions to this post: you should pick a bigger worm, a different brand, pick a bigger hook, or you HAVE to use worm hooks not EWG, or you have to go weightless, etc. etc.  These are just the options that work for me.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just because the kids are little, doesn't mean the lures need to be.  They all can toss "normal" size lures that will catch the same fish and numbers that the "mini" lures do.  I've had a lot of kids on my boat guiding and they throw the same things the big boys are.  Makes them proud as punch, especially if they hook into a goodun!!  Now if you are going after panfish, that's another story.  My setup for kids was a 3 inch Kalens Smoke Salt & Pepper grub on a 3/16ths jighead or a 4 inch Senko texas rigged with a 3.0 EWG Gamakatsu hook.  Preference went to the Senko since I don't like getting hooked. :lol:;) And that happened a lot!!  

Oh, the other exception was Crappie fishing.  Live minnows on snelled hooks.  Plus they got to play with the minnow bucket waiting for bites.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Flow Master said:

My question is what would be the best rod/reel combo to fish these and how should the be tyed on?

 

My 3 year old has a "Dock Demon" it is a short rod with an ultralight reel on it. My 7 year old won it in a fishing contest at our local parks department pond. He absolutely loves it. For it being so tiny, it has actually got a lot of backbone. It is not a "kids" setup, as I have used it multiple times for casting when it is a tight space to cast in. I have used DT6 crankbaits and spinnerbaits on it with no problems.

 

I would agree with some of the comments above about the lures not needing to be tiny, however, if the kids use something that has a lot of drag in the water they will get tired pretty quick if they are casting. Lipless crankbaits are perfect for my kids, just depends on what is on the bottom as they tend to let them sink for a while before they begin to reel them in. My little kids have always preferred to use topwater stuff as they love seeing the water explode even if it is a little fish attacking!!

 

dock.jpg.9f3cc7df17d18bc370e572efac5ab709.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TOXIC said:

Just because the kids are little, doesn't mean the lures need to be.  They all can toss "normal" size lures that will catch the same fish and numbers that the "mini" lures do.

What size rods are they using?  My son is using a 6' UL/F and that's pushing it for his size/age, he'd probably prefer a 5' or 5'6, but I know he'll grow into the 6' quickly. I haven't tried, but I'm not sure his 6' UL could handle the full size lures I want him to start using (spinnerbaits, chatterbaits, keel-weighted paddletails). Maybe it can, but by downsizing I'm thinking he'll be getting more numbers and action than bigguns, but I'm sure his face will light up the day he hauls in a 4lber.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just keep the weights down on the lures and a 3 inch grub or 4 inch senko like I mentioned can both be thrown on that rod.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, TOXIC said:

Just because the kids are little, doesn't mean the lures need to be.  They all can toss "normal" size lures that will catch the same fish and numbers that the "mini" lures do.  I've had a lot of kids on my boat guiding and they throw the same things the big boys are.  Makes them proud as punch, especially if they hook into a goodun!!  Now if you are going after panfish, that's another story.  My setup for kids was a 3 inch Kalens Smoke Salt & Pepper grub on a 3/16ths jighead or a 4 inch Senko texas rigged with a 3.0 EWG Gamakatsu hook.  Preference went to the Senko since I don't like getting hooked. :lol:;) And that happened a lot!!  

Oh, the other exception was Crappie fishing.  Live minnows on snelled hooks.  Plus they got to play with the minnow bucket waiting for bites.  

My first experiences catching bass were with a Zebco 33 on a medium 5-6 casting rod throwing Mepps Comets, Rooster Tails, Rebel Wee R's and crappie grubs. Then came the T rig. The medium sized cranks, or even a Shad rap, were the easiest things for me to get a hook into bass. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    bass fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing rods

    fishing rods


    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    bass fish

    fishing poles

    Truck Caps

    fishing reels
    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×