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Junger

Securing items in boat lockers

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Hi, I just bought my first used bass boat and have a lot of noob questions.

 

The boat has two batteries and two gas containers in the storage locker by the transom. It's pretty roomy and there's enough space that I can envision them sliding when trailering. The batteries are pretty heavy, and the gas tanks would be too when full, but is the best way to install some kind of tie down and keep them secure that way?

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battery trays would probably be the best way to handle that i'm sure you can find them at harbor freight or somewhere similar that they wouldn't be too expensive.

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You can do several things. You can solidly mount battery trays to the floor of the compartment. Secure the batteries with the straps they come with.  Or you could use some of the plastic wood and make a shallow shelf elevated by some of the plastic wood ( artificial decking material) and mount the battery trays or battery boxes to it. If you do that you could build separated areas for the batteries and fuel tanks so they cannot slide around. The thing you do not want to do is mount pressure treated wood directly on an aluminum hull. The chemicals will destroy the hull or aluminum floor.

If you want to see some pics of what I mean my friend did a real nice job on his boat. I could send you to him to see some. He is a member on here.

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19 minutes ago, fishnkamp said:

You can do several things. You can solidly mount battery trays to the floor of the compartment. Secure the batteries with the straps they come with.  Or you could use some of the plastic wood and make a shallow shelf elevated by some of the plastic wood ( artificial decking material) and mount the battery trays or battery boxes to it. If you do that you could build separated areas for the batteries and fuel tanks so they cannot slide around. The thing you do not want to do is mount pressure treated wood directly on an aluminum hull. The chemicals will destroy the hull or aluminum floor.

If you want to see some pics of what I mean my friend did a real nice job on his boat. I could send you to him to see some. He is a member on here.

So you cut the plastic wood to the size/shape of the compartment area floor perimeter, so when the gas/batteries are strapped to anchors on it, the plastic wood doesn't move around either correct?

 

Sure, send your buddy my way please.

 

Thanks!

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Your batteries and fuel containers are even more likely to slide around when your boat is pitched by waves or wakes than while trailering.

 

I haven’t been able to find any federal regulations regarding batteries and fuel containers on vessels propelled by outboard motors. The most frequently cited regulation is 33 CFR 183.401-460, but it states (in pertinent part)(emphasis added), “This subpart applies to all boats that have gasoline engines, except outboard engines. . . .”

 

The website for the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary has guidelines for an Online Virtual Vessel Safety Check:

 

http://wow.uscgaux.info/content.php?unit=V-DEPT&category=virtual-safety-check

 

The guidelines state, in pertinent part:

 

0A73F1A6-C917-4D3D-BD8B-194BD04B67B4.jpeg.360ac4e01073df74de0d49b47bcb7914.jpeg

 

The United States Coast Guard thinks that you should properly secure your batteries and fuel containers. And so do you, or you wouldn’t have posted this, right?

 

Battery trays or boxes, battery terminal covers and straps for your fuel containers are easy to obtain and use. Better safe than burned alive. :thumbsup:

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Yeah, I'm just trying to figure out the best/easiest way to secure....with straps, I'll need to drill anchors into the hull right?  Kinda scared to do that....

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Here is what my friend Kris did. Now he had a wide open boat but you can use his idea and modify it. I have done this in some of my old boats. I used a some 1/2 inch thick pieces on the bottom and shaped a larger floor section to match my compartment. Next I attached my battery boxes and sectioned off an area to hold my fuel tank. The advantage is nothing could move and I was not screwing directly into the hull.

Here is a pic from Kris's boat. Obviously you would build just the floor and perhaps some short dividers.

 

po7VrXHij

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11 minutes ago, fishnkamp said:

Here is what my friend Kris did. Now he had a wide open boat but you can use his idea and modify it. I have done this in some of my old boats. I used a some 1/2 inch thick pieces on the bottom and shaped a larger floor section to match my compartment. Next I attached my battery boxes and sectioned off an area to hold my fuel tank. The advantage is nothing could move and I was not screwing directly into the hull.

Here is a pic from Kris's boat. Obviously you would build just the floor and perhaps some short dividers.

 

po7VrXHij

Pic didn't work, but what you describe is what I was thinking. Yes, I'm very scared to drill anchors into the hull and will go with this method. I'm thinking PVC board, and using some foam noodles around the edges to give some more cushion as the cutouts will butt up against the gunnel walls.

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You would be securing the battery trays to the floor of the compartment, not the hull.  There shouldn't be any fears or issues with that.  That's why it's there.  Self tapping, stainless steel screws are probably the easiest route.

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11 minutes ago, J Francho said:

You would be securing the battery trays to the floor of the compartment, not the hull.  There shouldn't be any fears or issues with that.  That's why it's there.  Self tapping, stainless steel screws are probably the easiest route.

OK I see what you're saying. If I were to do that, should I put some rubber grommets around the screws? Noob questions - I put the disclaimer in my first post. :)

 

Edit: Looked at the price of PVC board or marine board....they are not cheap!

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Just make a wooden sub floor if you have a aluminum boat without a sub floor flat surface. Lots of ways to do this; marine plywood and 2x2 fastened to the bottom side cross ways with rubber mate or carpet against the aluminum to raise the plywood off the boat bottom to allow water to drain. Fasten battery try's or boxes to the sub floor and add strap fasteners to to hold down the gas cans. The weight of the batteries and cans will hold down the sub floor. I use plastic milk crate to hold my anchor, ropes, dock bumpers etc in the rear storage compartment.

Tom

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30 minutes ago, Junger said:

OK I see what you're saying. If I were to do that, should I put some rubber grommets around the screws?

Rubber?  No.  You'll want to use a fender if you're attaching a plastic battery tray, though.  The screw heads would be too small.  The tray should have all the hardware.

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