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EGbassing

How do you keep line tight on the spool? (baitcaster)

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I was fishing a small X-rap today and I had my spool tension pretty loose so I could cast it pretty far. Thing is, on every cast, the first 40 - 60 feet of my line would sort of backlash without tangling and then if it got through those 40 - 60 feet the backlash would be gone. It's hard to explain what it was doing, but I'm 99% sure it was doing that because those 40 - 60 feet of line were loose on the spool. I noticed that when I was working that X-rap, I was always reeling in slack line. Is there any way to fix this?

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Try tightening the spool tension knob 1/4" and see if that helps.

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You might also find a way to comfortably reel the line between your fingers.  The added benefit of keeping a finger on the line will be increased strike detection.

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What type of line and what type of rod are you using for this crankbait? 

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I have that problem occasionally if the lure I'm using doesn't create a lot of drag coming through the water. 

 

For that reason I will do one or more of the following.....

 

1. As mentioned above, make a few casts and retrieve with your fingers putting tension on the line as you retrieve

 

2. Make a couple of good long casts with a lure that has a lot of drag coming through the water to retension the line

 

3. After almost every trip on the water I re-seat the line on my spools by tying off to a tree or pole, walking the spool out, then reeling in with heavy tension on the line.

 

Those should do the trick. Unfortunately there are just some lures that don't create enough drag to tension the line tightly, it's just part of the game. But you're on the right track. Good spool lay will prevent backlashes, line dig, and give you more predictable casting performance.

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I'm betting your settings on your reel weren't right for the lure you were using, not that your reel wasn't spooling the line properly. I've thrown every jerkbait under the sun and I've never experienced this.

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1 hour ago, Jig Man said:

Try tightening the spool tension knob 1/4" and see if that helps.

I tried that and it did reduce the backlash but I lost a lot of casting distance. It's a 5' diver and I'm fishing from the bank so I'm just trying to get it as far out as possible.

56 minutes ago, J.Vincent said:

What type of line and what type of rod are you using for this crankbait? 

MH/F Favorite Rods White Bird with an Abu Garcia Blackmax reel. I had 15LB. Seaguar Red Label on the reel, and an X-rap tied on.

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Every spool of Red Label I've ever used has had a LOT of memory. Even after I used Line & Lure it sprang off the spool like a watch coil.

 

Maybe try something with considerably less memory, I would personally recommend a braid + leader option as I have personally had success with that. 

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 X2 what Preytorien said. I think it's a rod/lure combo though. Too heavy of a rod and too light of a lure won't allow lure drag to be created so no tension on the line creating loose coils as you reel. Using braid helps a little...

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Is it happening at the beginning or middle of the cast?  If so then that is normal for linear mag brake reels like the Black Max.  You're going to need to add a little more spool tension or ride your thumb over the spool.  Switching to a centrifugal or Magforce Z reel would solve The problem.  The Daiwa Fuego CT is pretty cheap on Ebay or Amazon.

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I simple thing I have programed myself to do is after making a long cast I always check the spool for any slack at all.   A little slack will continue to get worse if you don;t fix it right away.  Use a good quality reel, with quality line.  I take a quick glance and then pull any loose line and then squeeze the line while reeling the slack.  Tighten your knob, tighten up your speed spool control.  A few feet less on the cast for no problems is a good sacrifice.  I use floro a lot, so  tight spooled line helps!  Don't cast into the wind unless you have too, then as you again control, wind won't be a big problem.   All these thing help.

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This happens to me on occasion but I haven't tried very hard to figure out why. It's usually when I make a quick/hard "whipping" kind of cast to try getting some distance. Maybe try making a smoother, less abrupt cast. 

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4 hours ago, EGbassing said:

I was fishing a small X-rap today and I had my spool tension pretty loose so I could cast it pretty far. Thing is, on every cast, the first 40 - 60 feet of my line would sort of backlash without tangling and then if it got through those 40 - 60 feet the backlash would be gone. It's hard to explain what it was doing, but I'm 99% sure it was doing that because those 40 - 60 feet of line were loose on the spool. I noticed that when I was working that X-rap, I was always reeling in slack line. Is there any way to fix this?

I know exactly what you mean, basically anytime you're reeling in slack line, it's never going to lay tight to the spool with a baitcaster. I just keep checking how my line lays on the spool, then do a long bomb cast and straight retrieve to get it tight again. I don't let it get out of hand or it will cause a birdnest eventually. 

 

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What you are experiencing is what happens just before a backlash.   Increase thumb control, brakes, or both.

 

Any time the spool is turning faster the a casted lure is taking it, this will occur

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I’ve come to accept this is part of the nature of the beast for applications for which this can and does happen. I don’t do much at all when it happens in the beginning.  Why? Because other than looking scary, it has never resulted in a bird’s nest. Ever — even when I intentionally try to make a birds nest.

 

If it starts to bug me, I will make a cast large enough to ensure that the loose line is off the spool and do what has already been described, add tension to the line, by hand or water. I hate wasting a cast on that, lol. 

 

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I just checked out the rod you are using and it's actually a very unique rod. I've never used that specific rod but it sounds a heck of a lot like the Daiwa AIRD Rods, they were also made with extra rigidity at the tip section of the blank (like the favorite white bird) and many were labeled fast but closer to an extra fast. I personally wouldn't use a Medium Heavy Extra Fast Action for that specific lure you mentioned , but a Medium moderate fast or medium heavy moderate fast with a more forgiving blank would probably be more suitable, as it would create some additional drag or resistance on the lure during the retrieve, and this is enough to allow for the line to wind on the spool more consistently. Also the magnetic braking system in the black max is similar to my Revo X reels, and they commonly have a lot of initial spool rotation if rod motion is to fast at the beginning of a cast (doesn't really matter even if you have the tension knob adjusted perfectly, the Abu magtrax braking system will do this). The more fluid and smooth the casting motion the better this braking system will perform. I just think you have a few things working against you with this specific combo, when using it for that specific lure and presentation. Just my two cents, hope it makes sense or maybe someone else can chime in and confirm if what I'm thinking makes sense.

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Those of us who also flyfish get a little insight to this problem.  When flyfishing your line is almost always heavier than your lure and you learn how to cast the line and not the lure.  In a baitcaster when a light lure is traveling slower than the spool feeding line to it, you either get a backlash or what you are experiencing which is what I call spool puff.  There's a number of ways to eliminate it.  Tighten your spool control a little which will decrease your casting distance, downsize your line so there is less resistance when casting or change your arm motion when casting.  Any wrong motion in your wrist or forearm when casting with a lighter lure will send a "hump" or bulge for lack of a better term down your line towards your lure.  When it reaches your lure it reverses and heads back towards your reel.  If your lure makes contact with the water before it gets all the way back, you get line puff on your reel, if it doesn't, you get a backlash.  If you have an educated thumb you can cast through the puff and get to the tight line on your reel.  When you then reel in everything is back to snug for the next cast.  I have taught a lot of people how to use a baitcaster when guiding and throwing light lures on a baitcaster is one of the tougher things to master.  

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