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I just bought a 20 foot Lowe bay boat (basically a CC bass boat layout). I don't have a lot of motorized boat experience and am wondering what anchor and what length and type of anchor line I need. Thanks. 

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Depends on what you’re anchoring in river ,lake,ocean.but a good universal stile is a navy anchor I have a 18’ ranger with a 20lb navy works great on lakes and when I go to the river I add a 4’ chain . The standard is 3’ of line for every foot of water depth strong current or tide requires more hopefully this helps. Also use nylon line so that it doesn’t absorb water.

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Danforth anchor, anchor chain, and you need enough anchor rope for 3x the depth you are anchoring in

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More info...I will be fishing in southern impoundments like Table Rock, Bull Shoals, Ouachita, Tenkiller, etc. I would love to go to the salt some time, but not in the near future. 

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Hard to a simple 20 lb navy anchor. I use 100' of 3/4" rope and a plastic milk crate to store it in when not needing a anchor. 3 to 1 (30 degree) scope is standard and chain is optional depending on bottom type and wind or current.

More expensive option are folding box anchors, take up less storage space.

Tom

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Direct from the USCG:

 

Anchoring Anchoring is done for two principal reasons: 1) to stop for fishing, swimming, lunch, or an overnight stay, and 2) to keep the boat from running aground in bad weather or as a result of engine failure . Anchoring can be a simple task if you follow these guidelines: • Make sure you have the proper type of anchor (Danforth/Plow/ Mushroom) . • Attach a 3-6 foot length of galvanized chain to the anchor . A chain will withstand abrasion by sand, rock, or mud on the bottom much better than a fiber line . • Attach a length of nylon anchor line to the end of the chain using an anchor swivel, a combination called the “Rode .” The nylon will stretch under the impact of heavy waves or wind, cushioning the strain on the boat and the anchor . • Select an area that offers maximum protection from wind, current, and boat traffic . • Determine the water depth and type of bottom (preferably sand or mud) . • Calculate the amount of anchor line you will need to let out . The general rule is five to seven times as much line as the depth of water plus the distance from the surface of the water to where the anchor will attach to the bow . For example, if the water is eight feet deep and it is two feet from the surface of the water to your bow cleat, you would multiply 10 feet by 5 or 7 to get the amount of anchor line to put out .

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You don't need 5-7 X rope length to depth for small craft.

I have mentioned before that in my youth I worked at a boat landing, today called a marina, that rented a fleet of 50 fishing boats. Each boat had 15 lb to 20 lb navy anchors with 75' of 3/4" hemp rope, no chain. Fisherman anchored these boats for trout fishing mostly and we lost very few anchors or wore out anchor ropes. 3/4" rope is larger then needed to hold the boat securely anchored however small rope is very difficult to pull in the anchor with using your hands. Today most rope is nylon and 3/8 p" will hold a boat securely but very hard on your hands.

I use 20 lb navy anchor that is over 45 years old with old 3/4" hemp rope without a chain for all my bass boats ranging from 14' to 19 1/2' without any issues over that time period. I re splice the anchor connections when I think of it, maybe every 10 years.

Tom

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Fair enough but what if you are on the great lakes (where an anchor is required equipment) and the DNR Officer that does the safety check on you goes by the USCG Regulations?  Better safe than sorry.  

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Everyone must follow USCG regulations for boats over 16' for inland waterways they are responsible to protect including the Great Lakes. Your post is right out of the USCG recommendations for anchoring. I looked but missed required anchor weight for boat lengths, they suggest 7 X chain length to bottom depth and that could be for large vessels, they suggest 3' of chain and rope in the referenced recommendations. 

We had 200' of chain in the anchor locker for the ocean sport fishing boat with a Danforth anchor and winch, not necessary for inland water.

Tom

 

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USCG Regulations change for different bodies of water.  Here in Virginia we are subject to USCG regulation (I know because I have been boarded:lol:) but we are not required to carry an anchor.  I referenced the Great Lakes because their requirements are different than ours and they do require an anchor as standard equipment.  My point was that if required, you better have enough rope to satisfy the Officer doing the check on the body of water you are on.  

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Just to fill the blanks a little here . . . . 

USCG Regulations for both navigation & safety equipment apply to 'federal waters'.

In the ocean, federal waters go from the bank out to 200 miles(for US Flagged vessels); State waters go out to 3 miles.

On inland lakes & rivers - Federal rules apply to waters that either border the USA and another county or 

where the waterway is on the boundary of two or more states; Like the Mississippi River.

Lakes and waterways that border USA & Mexico, USA & Canada and any waterway or lake that exists IN two or more states; will have a Federal presence.  States certainly can do and will enforce their State jurisdiction where applicable.

But the USCG will also board & enforce all applicable State & Federal Rules & regs on these water.  

A-Jay

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