Jump to content

Recommended Posts

So, the unthinkable has happened and you find yourself in the water, with or without a PFD. You can try to get back to your kayak, or to shore assuming you are an experienced swimmer. If not, there are steps you can take to increase your chances of survival. First, stay calm. The human body will naturally float, but only if you remain calm. If you panic and begin thrashing about, your body will drop lower into the water, or even sink. Your lungs are an important part of the flotation process and actually help in keeping you afloat. You must breathe normally, taking regular breaths. Avoid taking in huge breaths of air as this causes a greater change in volume outside the lungs when you exhale, causing your body to drop lower into the water. Lastly, you need to take up a body position that will help keep you afloat until help arrives. You can tread water by assuming a vertical position, extending your arms horizontally and moving them back and forth, slowly kicking your feet (like a flutter kick) or moving your legs somewhat like a frog would, but in opposite directions. (This takes practice) You may also assume a float position. To do this, you lay back, face up, keeping your legs together and fully extended. Your arms should be at your side or behind your head with fingers interlocked behind the head. Keep your chin tilted upward, body straight and horizontal with the surface of the water. Avoid tilting your head forward as this puts strain on the neck and shifts weight to the center of the torso, causing your body to go lower into the water. Should you feel your legs dropping down deeper into the water; you can perform the flutter kick to bring them back up horizontal.

All this should be practiced with an experienced swimmer/instructor before going out alone to enjoy your new found hobby, kayak fishing.

Note: Having a signaling device such as a whistle and light attached to your PFD will also increase your chances of rescue.

859 (5).jpg

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A timely post !

.....great info

A couple other things....staying with your kayak is usually the best thing you can do and practice getting back in.  There are several videos on this.  If separated, you go into survival mode, not swimming mode.

Dump your shoes.

Your pants can be used as a PFD ( see YouTube)

If you struggle on your back, roll to your face, roll your back with face in the water, hands on the surface. When a breath is needed slowly sweep your hands down slow and raise your face.  You can survive hours if you stay calm.

on a side note, I know guys that tether themselves to the seat of the kayak with 6 feet of cord to avoid separation 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good info.  

I also cannot ever imagine a situation where tethering yourself to your kayak would be a benefit, especially with only 6 feet of cord.  That really isn't that much cord at all.  You will be better off practicing getting back to your kayak than having to deal with a rope tied from you to your kayak, especially if you hav a PFD on already.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went for a swim once right after I started kayak fishing. Here's a tip. Try to avoid your fishing line. I was trying not to lose my rod and I got the braid on my spinning rod wrapped around my leg while trying to tread water. I didn't need to because I was wearing a PFD. But it was reflexive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, the reel ess said:

I went for a swim once right after I started kayak fishing. Here's a tip. Try to avoid your fishing line. I was trying not to lose my rod and I got the braid on my spinning rod wrapped around my leg while trying to tread water. I didn't need to because I was wearing a PFD. But it was reflexive.

These are the exact reasons I am not a fan of tethering anything in a kayak.  I have flipped my kayak a couple times when i first started and lost a few rods but that was a about it.  Most if not all situations of a flipped kayak are user error and since i have fixed those, I have yet to flip my boat, well that and the ridiculous stability fo fishing kayaks these days helps as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the final components of a search & recuse case, if there were any, was the 'survivor interview'.

Some of the repeatedly mentioned aspects of the sudden & unexpected first time small boat capsizing that victims often reported to me include but are not limited to;

 

Surprised how heavy and difficult it was to just move when fully clothed & submerged - and swimming was very difficult and quickly exhausting.  Certain bulky footwear can contribute to this.  

 

Didn't think the water 'was so cold'  - regardless of the season.

 

The shock of going in was disorienting and victims often swallow quite a bit of water doing it; as well as afterward while attempting their own rescue; whether alone or not.  Can be very debilitating.

 

"I couldn't see anything" Especially when the waters's surface is not flat calm - with ones eyes virtually at water level,  a stiff wind & even 1 foot waves are near impossible to see 'over' and through.  So when two or more humans go overboard - it can be hard to find each other - especially at night. 

 

In windy conditions, a relatively light craft (like a kayak or a canoe) capsized or not, will quickly drift away - "faster than I could swim" especially fully clothed.  Current can complicate this quite a bit.

 

Stay Safe

A-Jay

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Harold Scoggins said:

All this should be practiced

^^^

 

We grew up on salt water and swimming every summer was a given. When my neighbor taught me and my sisters how to swim without a PFD what I remember most was her saying just lay on our backs, relax, we'll sink down a bit but we'll float. If our legs started to drop just stretch out our arms and sweep them from head to toe, with a gentle kick of the legs. When we finally had the guts to trust her and try it, we floated and it felt like magic, and opened up a new world of swimming freedom.

 

That was around 25 years ago and since then I tested the water only on a few occasions. Wouldn't hurt to see if the skills still work - capsizing, swimming, reboarding - under controlled conditions (shallow water, with someone else along as a spotter).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Know how to use one before it is needed.

859 (6).jpg

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, that was my first kayak and I got a lot better at it since. The other rods in holders didn't come out because it didn't actually flip. But I had one in my hand that I did not want to lose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, NHBull said:

I know guys that tether themselves to the seat of the kayak with 6 feet of cord to avoid separation

Not in a million years would I think this is a good idea.  If you're that bad at it, time to wear a PFD.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, J Francho said:

Not in a million years would I think this is a good idea.  If you're that bad at it, time to wear a PFD.

X2, Not happening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, J Francho said:

Not in a million years would I think this is a good idea.  If you're that bad at it, time to wear a PFD.

 

38 minutes ago, Harold Scoggins said:

X2, Not happening.

Even in a canoe don't do this. I tether my rods, I tether my tackle bags, I will NOT tether myself...I wear my PFD the whole time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the first things I learned getting into this was to never tie yourself, your child, or your dog to the boat. That's a disaster waiting to happen. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing poles

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...