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Powder Paint Question


Jigfishn10
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Hey all, just a quick question on powder painting jig heads.

kmucutie 5 pcs Bucktail Jig Bass Flounder Striper Bluefish Fishing Lure  Glow Bucktail Jig

The top part of the head on this jig is painted and the bottom looks like it's left in it's natural raw lead. Is this left untreated or would you treat/seal it with something? 

 

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks 

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It looks painted to me but if you think it isn’t then you could coat it with Devcon epoxy or you might just use clear Hard as Nails fingernail polish.  They even have it with glitter.  I sometimes coat spinner bait heads with it.

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19 minutes ago, Jig Man said:

It looks painted to me but if you think it isn’t then you could coat it with Devcon epoxy or you might just use clear Hard as Nails fingernail polish.  They even have it with glitter.  I sometimes coat spinner bait heads with it.

Is there a chrome like powder paint being made?

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It looks like two colors to me. Bottom silver paint or you could leave it raw, as the raw lead will be shinier and the top color is pink. It also looks like it is airbrushed and not powder painted. The color blend is too perfect for powder paint. But you can get close with powder painting this jig. Couple of suggestions.

 

If you are going to do multi-color take your time and think the process thru and go slow.

If you want brilliant eye popping colors, clearcoat the entire jig as Jigman said with either Devcon 2 ton or E-tex. Devcon is stronger  but heavier and not as clear as E-tex.

If I were to paint that jig I would do it either of these two ways. 

    A. leave the bottom shiny and dust the top only with pink powder paint. Problem with pink is that it really could use a white base coat for the pink to look like pink. So you could also dust the top in white before you put the pink topcoat.

     B. Dust the entire jig in white, next do the bottom in sliver chrome, going up the sides, and then dust the top down in pink. 

 

Bake your jig and then let cool and clearcoat.  It's an easy process and not too complicated. Just think things thru before you do the jigs. You can also practice on screw bolts or small pieces of clean steel or aluminum.

 

Good Luck.

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Just know that cadman may be the best powder paint multi color artist in North America.  Everything he posted is an absolute except he sees it as a lot easier than the rest of us.

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1 minute ago, Jigfishn10 said:

Thank you for all that information @cadman, very kind of you. Hoe you don't mind I copied and pasted to a word doc?

 

If I may ask 1 other question. I'm hearing/reading mixed info on baking. Would 325* for 20 min work? 

Here is my take on baking. I don't have all the answers, but that is a start. First of all whose powder paint are you using? Is it Pro-Tech or some off brand. Also definitely do some of the following things.

 

#1 Check to make sure that your toaster oven is really 325degrees inside as it is labeled outside on the dial. They are known to be notoriously inaccurate.

#2 Paint all of your jigs and then bake  just one jig after you have preheated the toaster oven. After the allotted time, take it out let it cool and then see how it looks. Your jig should have a very smooth glossy look to it.

 

So 325degrees at 20 minutes would be a good start. I would do 325 at 15 minutes.

What you don't want to do is burn the paitn and or get it so hot that the paint will sag and cause teardrops. Just remember that you can always put it back in the oven a second time.

 

Finally don't overthink the paint baking process. After all these are fishing jigs and you will bang them up or scratch them on the rocks. You will probably lose that jig before the paint wears off. Also baking the jig only hardens it for more abrasion resistance. It won't be perfect. 

 

I worked in several companies that powder painted steel panels. In those cases we had to follow strict powder paint specs, and we had to do powder paint hardness tests. But those are rigorous standards which need not be applied to painting jigs. Painting jigs is supposed to be fun. So have fun with it and go fishing.

 

Good Luck.

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@cadman thanks for the quick response. These jigs are going in the ocean between a contour line of 60' and 90' so your advice of not overthinking it is perfect. Because I'm fishing so deep, I figured these jigs would be perfect to practice on.

 

My concern with baking has much to do about not curing enough, but you say they can go back in which is perfect. I honestly thought I had one shot at it.

 

Great tip on oven temp, that's another important tip I need to put on my list of "checks".

 

Finally, I can't give reaction "likes" today. There's a quota of how many you can give. I'll revisit this thread to make sure I get you and @Jig Man. LOL

 

Thanks again.

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7 minutes ago, Jigfishn10 said:

@cadman thanks for the quick response. These jigs are going in the ocean between a contour line of 60' and 90' so your advice of not overthinking it is perfect. Because I'm fishing so deep, I figured these jigs would be perfect to practice on.

 

My concern with baking has much to do about not curing enough, but you say they can go back in which is perfect. I honestly thought I had one shot at it.

 

Great tip on oven temp, that's another important tip I need to put on my list of "checks".

 

Finally, I can't give reaction "likes" today. There's a quota of how many you can give. I'll revisit this thread to make sure I get you and @Jig Man. LOL

 

Thanks again.

 

I am always willing to help (no need for thanks). There are a lot of guys that powder paint and are really good at it on this site. There is another powder painting process, which entails an air brush. I know of the process but am not really good at it. The person I know that has been doing it a long time and is very good at it is a member by the name of Smalljaw67. He may come on here and give you his version. Everyone finds their own unique way of powder painting. Practice and see what works for you. If you run into problems, post your questions and someone will always help. We've all been where you are at one time. Practice makes perfect (sometimes).

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7 minutes ago, cadman said:

 

I am always willing to help (no need for thanks). There are a lot of guys that powder paint and are really good at it on this site. Practice makes perfect (sometimes).

Thanks. I've known you for 10 plus years and you always gave great advice and encouragement to all you've helped. 

 

To your point about practice? So true, you got to be willing to fail sometime before you succeed. 

 

Have a great day.

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Most powder coats have a curing window meaning you can over bake them for a certain amount of time before you'd get adverse effects. Not exactly sure if powders like pro-tec provide those numbers but in more industry standard products everything has data sheets that provide info like that. 

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If you don't have an airbrush to do a two colored head like that, you can do what I do. 

 

Go buy a cheap makeup brush. Dip it in your powder paint. Then tap the brush with your finger and sprinkle it on the top of the jig. This will give you that two-toned color you're looking for. 

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12 hours ago, Jig Man said:

Ok John when you are ready you can look up that fluid bed tutorial that I put on Jared’s site a few years ago.

Please don't start digging a rabbit hole for me!!!:)

 

BTW: I think that site got hacked...I'm getting some love notes from my security software when I try to log in. Be careful if you try to go over there

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On 7/30/2021 at 6:43 AM, Jigfishn10 said:

Please don't start digging a rabbit hole for me!!!:)

 

BTW: I think that site got hacked...I'm getting some love notes from my security software when I try to log in. Be careful if you try to go over there

If you are looking for fluid bed plans I have some I made 8 years ago. PM me your e-mail and I will send them to you.

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Jig heads and powder paint just came in. I'm still on vacation so won't be able to try a few out until Sunday earliest. 

 

I'm sure I'll be reading through these posts a few times before I get underway.

 

EDIT:

I had to retie a couple of bucktails this week. Took a little longer with 1 good eye but I thought they came out good. This will be a fun project.

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5 minutes ago, Jigfishn10 said:

Does anyone heat their jig heads with a heat gun prior to powder painting? I was planning on using mine and it's a 2 setting heat gun delivering 1,200 watts. I think it's 450*F/1,100*F. I would think that would be plenty to heat up the lead, no?

I used to run a powder coating shop in GA for years. 

 

That technique is called hot flocking for bigger parts. It helps with adhesion to tricky parts for sure, but will also be tougher to judge mil thickness as the power once its laid will melt quicker making it more difficult to judge how much has been applied. 

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43 minutes ago, Jigfishn10 said:

Does anyone heat their jig heads with a heat gun prior to powder painting? I was planning on using mine and it's a 2 setting heat gun delivering 1,200 watts. I think it's 450*F/1,100*F. I would think that would be plenty to heat up the lead, no?

I use a heat gun on the high setting.  I warm up the gun and meticulously count the seconds that it is in contact with the jig head.  I don’t want mine hot enough to make the powder shiny.  I just want a dull coat that sticks.  That gives me a very thin coat which won’t run when baked in my $2 garage sale toaster oven.

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45 minutes ago, InfantryMP said:

I used to run a powder coating shop in GA for years. 

 

That technique is called hot flocking for bigger parts. It helps with adhesion to tricky parts for sure, but will also be tougher to judge mil thickness as the power once its laid will melt quicker making it more difficult to judge how much has been applied. 

That’s really good to know. I’ll have to watch my temp. These jigs have some really nice detail that I don’t want to cover with too much paint. Also, being in construction, I love the technical terms. Learn something every day. Thanks man.
 

21 minutes ago, Jig Man said:

I use a heat gun on the high setting.  I warm up the gun and meticulously count the seconds that it is in contact with the jig head.  I don’t want mine hot enough to make the powder shiny.  I just want a dull coat that sticks.  That gives me a very thin coat which won’t run when baked in my $2 garage sale toaster oven.

Perfect! As mentioned above, I’m looking for a thin coat. I was going to start with a “10” count. You think that would be long enough. I think I read some where between 10 - 15?

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