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Bassackward

Pricey rods vs. $40 rods?? Differences

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Just wondering what advantage is in the pricier rods.  Sensitivty, weight, strength, casting??? I've always used BPS GS Series rods($40)....so i dont really know about the advantages of the $100+ rods.  Im sure there has to be some reason they are better

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Sensitivity, weight, duribility, better warrenties, just to name a few.

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Most "low cost" rods won't handle braid becouse of the soft guide material.

Most "low cost" rods do not have good cork or foam (if they have cork at all).

Most "low cost" rods are not nearly as sensitive.

Most "low cost" rods do not hold up as well, meaning they start to loose their action and power becouse of inferior materials.

Most "low cost" rods are not backed by the maker very well, some stores will back thiers though.

Some "low cost" rods are light weight, but the way they make them light is not good.

Most "low cost" rods have fewer guides, which is not good. Sometimes just one guide can make the difference between a good rod, and a great rod. Short 2 or more guides is the same difference as a moonless night, and high noon on a cloudless summer day.

Most, but not all "pricey" rods have some magin of "name" in the price. Meaning you do pay for the name on top of the quality.

Well, that's about the only drawback to a "pricey" rod I can think of.

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Same answer different question:  What is the difference between a bicycle and a Mercedes?

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like pfluemis said the guides usually cant handle braid the cork is usually alot better on the more expensive rods!! Weight is usually a factor but the huge dif in my opinion you can feel a whole lot more with the higherpriced rods!! my preference is G loomis!!! jus to throw that out there ;D ;D

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Balance and castability are another few reasons to go quality.  Casting has a lot to do with rod your are using as well as the reel.

Vic

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Just curious, whats the difference between a Fuji aluminum oxide guide on a $50 rod and one on a $150 rod?

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Guest muddy

I have a Fenwick Ventura and 2 GT's (40 for the Ventura5 years old and 60 for the GTs 4 years old) all three handle braid, have excellent cork handels, both have been used hard, the Ventura has 8 guides the GT's 9 more than enough to give me great casting and fighting ability , including tips, none have lost any action, hadn't had any warranty issues because THEY DON"T SEEM TO BREAK, they are not as Light or sensitive as a couple of other more expensive rods that I own, and thats first hand experience, over somewhat long term use. I imagine the one All Star Insticnt I own will stand up also.

PS this is not to knock high end rods, I own a cutom wrap from Alpster, An All Star Titanium and a Fenwick Technia AV also, and I am loving them The truth is , you can find excellent products with less cash to spend.

Also many of my friends fish for years with Cabelas and BPS Im 7 rods, and they do just fine 8-)

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Just curious, whats the difference between a Fuji aluminum oxide guide on a $50 rod and one on a $150 rod?

It is the blank/foot interface? :-/ You got me, whats the difference?

The difference for me, or what I like about the "pricey" rods is the lighter weight.  That is a big deal to me.  Reel Mech has shown me that balance is super important in adding to that "light" feel.  Good balance can make your light rod feel lighter then it already is.  The one I just got from him today is absolutely beyond freaking incredible.  It weighs a svelte 4 oz but it feels like there is nothing in your hand with the reel mounted up...unreal!!

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Just curious, whats the difference between a Fuji aluminum oxide guide on a $50 rod and one on a $150 rod?

Aluminum oxide is a cheap guide, if modern $150 rods are being sold with them, I would steer clear of that maker.

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I have both and fish both, from a GLoomis GLX to a Berkely Cherry wood. Heck one of my favorite rods is a Berkley Lightning that I use for spinnerbaits . The biggest differences for me are weight and sensitivity. When I am fishing plastics or jigs, I like the rod to be super sensitive.

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I have a Fenwick Ventura and 2 GT's (40 for the Ventura5 years old and 60 for the GTs 4 years old) all three handle braid, have excellent cork handels, both have been used hard, the Ventura has 8 guides the GT's 9 more than enough to give me great casting and fighting ability , including tips, none have lost any action, hadn't had any warranty issues because THEY DON"T SEEM TO BREAK, they are not as Light or sensitive as a couple of other more expensive rods that I own, and thats first hand experience, over somewhat long term use. I imagine the one All Star Insticnt I own will stand up also.

PS this is not to knock high end rods, I own a cutom wrap from Alpster, An All Star Titanium and a Fenwick Technia AV also, and I am loving them The truth is , you can find excellent products with less cash to spend.

Also many of my friends fish for years with Cabelas and BPS Im 7 rods, and they do just fine 8-)

This is probably one of the most intelligent things said on this forum ever. Period. I couldn't agree more with the above statement.

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Well before I joined this forum I used mostly $40-$60 rods, but after reading about all of these awesome rod options, I have upgraded a bit  8-)

The biggest physical differences, IMO, were mentioned above: lighter weight and higher sensitivity.  Generally, lighter weight rods will be more sensitive anyway, but the higher quality of the components also affects that.  Anyway, although it's true that fish don't know how much you spend on your equipment, the fisherman feels the difference with every cast and every fish.  It's just much more pleasurable to fish with quality rods than with $40 rods, even though in many cases the $40 rod is just as effective.  Quality rods will also give you increased sensitivity, which with certain techniques (jigging, for example) is a really big advantage.  So it actually is also possible that using a high quality rod will catch you more fish.

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Lighter weight and sensitivity are the biggest differences.  If you're throwing your baits into the right places, a higher end rod may get you a few more fish in the end, especially if you're throwing any bait that requires more feel to detect strikes.  

If you aren't fishing in the right places, no rod, regardless of price will help you.

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I agree with a lot being said here; but a lot of folks visiting here are relatively new to the fishing world, or are raising a family. I take exception to those who try to make someone believe that they have to pay up to $200.+ for a fishing rod. Bull. I've caught a lot of fish in my day (63 this month) and have never even considered spending more than $70. or $80. for a rod - and that's only been since I've retired, that I've spent this much! I would be affraid of using a $300. rod for anything other than a wall decoration. For those well "healed" enough that's fine - and more power to 'em. But for us working folks, a regular BPS rod will truly suffice the "average" angler. And it will do nothing to enhanse his/her knowledge to extend themselves, just to keep up with the "Jone's" of our sport. Buying an expensive rod & reel may improve (slightly) the fit, finish, feel or prestige - but nothing but knowledge will put fish in the boat - or on the shore. JMO.

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I agree with a lot being said here; but a lot of folks visiting here are relatively new to the fishing world, or are raising a family. I take exception to those who try to make someone believe that they have to pay up to $200.+ for a fishing rod. Bull. I've caught a lot of fish in my day (63 this month) and have never even considered spending more than $70. or $80. for a rod - and that's only been since I've retired, that I've spent this much! I would be affraid of using a $300. rod for anything other than a wall decoration. For those well "healed" enough that's fine - and more power to 'em. But for us working folks, a regular BPS rod will truly suffice the "average" angler. And it will do nothing to enhanse his/her knowledge to extend themselves, just to keep up with the "Jone's" of our sport. Buying an expensive rod & reel may improve (slightly) the fit, finish, feel or prestige - but nothing but knowledge will put fish in the boat - or on the shore. JMO.

I agree w/ everything you said except maybe in the reels dept. I think that you're pretty much stuck w/ paying at least $70 on a capable and quality made reel.

Seriously, I can't believe how much ppl on here slam the BPS rods. I, as well as many other people absolutely love them. I'm glad you're happy w/ yours.

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EXCELLENT POINT! Mr.Your Excellency Professor Emmeritus Carp 7 ;D

The thread seemed to need the opinion of an eggspurt.   :)

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Just curious, whats the difference between a Fuji aluminum oxide guide on a $50 rod and one on a $150 rod?

Aluminum oxide is a cheap guide, if modern $150 rods are being sold with them, I would steer clear of that maker.

Actually, as a rod builder for over 10 yrs... (by this I mean I have some rods 10 yrs old with those guides) Fuji A/O guides hold up just fine. I use Hardloys on my saltwater rods along with braid with no failures in 10 yrs (my saltwater rods are old) and Hardloy is just another form of Aluminum Oxide, just a little better/harder. Don't get me wrong... the high priced guides are awesome, but they are, in most cases, not really necessary.  :)

If you're going to have a problem... it's usually with a cheaper brand! For my personal rods, I use nothing but Fuji guides (not to say that there aren't other good guides out there, just that I prefer Fuji).  :)

As far as the price of rods go... I have at least $150+ just in the blank and components alone (and that's really not all that much compared to some) on all of my Bass rods that I have built for myself. They are work horses. I enjoy making a cast with a custom built rod that I built myself, for a specific situation, paired with a Calcutta (That's all I use). A well balanced rod for the reel, spined properly, with the proper guide placement and so forth. For me, it's a joy to use my equipment, even if the fish aren't biting!    8-)

That being said... you can still catch fish on a Zebco Rhino! :)

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