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NCthompson

Skippin with a baitcaster

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how are you supposed to skip with a bait cast reel? Im talking about stopping the line. Do you stop it once it hits the water the 1st time or after the last? I tried it once and i got back lash

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You use your thumb to control the spool and line.

When I do it, I try to stop or slow down the spool when the bait first hits the water or else you will get a backlash.

Remember to "whipcrack" the rod with your wrist to get the bait to skip off the water once, twice or three times and to fall very gently into the water.

It takes a lot of practice so go to a pond or swimming pool and practice with a jig and pig or Texas-rigged Senko or finesse worm.

And place a piece of Scotch Tape over your spool so that any backlashes will go only to the Scotch Tape.  You do this by casting as far as you want to go and then pulling about another 20 or 30 feet of line off the spool.

Place the Scotch Tape over the spool.

It takes practice and you have to avoid the urge to fish while you are practicing.

We go to the pond or lake or river with good intentions of practicing and then we are overcome by this very strong power that says, "Fish, fish, fish, fish.  Practice is silly. Fish, fish, fish."

Be a strong UNC Tarheel and overcome the urge to fish and just practice.

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When I do this I use what some people call a roll cast - let some line out and just roll the lure around the end of the rod - I don't have much luck with a jig, but it is dynamite for a T-rigged worm or senko.  I have also seen people do this with a frog when throwing under willow trees.  The suggestion about using the tape is excellent - can't wait for the water to get soft so I can try that.

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I use a roll cast and  start to feather the line after the lure hits the water the first time. Took a while but can do it now. If you have a pool or access to a lake make sure you practice with your body the correct height above the water. I didn't the first time and when I got on the water I was totally off. Get a short stool or anything to elevate you about a foot above the water line or make sure you are practicing about the height your front deck is above the water.

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I use a baitcaster to skip.  It was VERY difficult at first but practice,practice,practice makes simple.  You must become one with the rod and reel.

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I agree with post about practice and using a spinning reel is far easier and requires far less skill, but...

When using my bait casting reels, I use a 7.5' rod and I tighten the drag very tight. I start the skip ~ @ 7:00 position and raise rod tip swiftly toward 1:00 position trying to keep the lure 12 inches or less from surface. I only get ~30-35' distance, but I can make some small skips without backlash. The bait casting reel is easier for me, but I can not get the distance I can with my spinning reel. I also recommend using a horney toad or some other similar easy casting plastic  for practice instead of jigs. The owners do not like the sound of the lead jigs hitting their boat-houses. I also beat up some of my jigs practicing on my pier.

Dr T

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I have found skipping with a baitcaster is easier if you have some weight to propel it.   Also, bulky baits like the tubes, frogs, jigs (double skirted) make for good skippers.

Remember the motions you used when skipping a rock.   Thats the same trajectory you are trying to achieve.   Its like pancaking that bait off the water at a low trajectory'

I will also say that alot of docks don't see swimbaits skipped under them, I found some that skip great and produce.

I like low profile reels, it allows my thumb to feather the cast the whole time, its done by feel.    

Remember casting in the wind,  when you start to feel the over-run and feather the cast with your thumb to prevent the backlash, its the very same principal, except, it happens as soon as you release the bait, you have to be in control.    

Don't try to skip bullet weights unless pegged.   I don't like bullets for skipping at all.    Florida screw-locks are okay, but normally, I don't skip baits that would require bullets.

I always adjust my tension knob by tightening it down some, that will eliminate alot of backlash.      

To get distance, you'll need some force, thus the thumb and tension knob are important.

Practice the motion of getting the bait to skip.   Once you master that, then increase your distance gradually.   Baby steps at first.

I practiced at a motel pool for along time on a milk crate.  Practice practice.

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Paging FiveBassLimit, Paging Dr. SkipjackFivebasslimit!

He's a skippin' fool! ;)

Burley-man, this is another thread that just hit the second page.....the first page or two is mainly about skippin with spinnin stuff, then the last part of it goes into skippin with baitcasting stuff.

http://www.bassresource.com/bass_fishing_forums/YaBB.pl?num=1203093770

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Good info. I would add using heavy line 17 or larger. The back-lashes will come, this line is easier to pick out and does not make such a big mess. Tape is a big help.

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I have found skipping with a baitcaster is easier if you have some weight to propel it. Also, bulky baits like the tubes, frogs, jigs (double skirted) make for good skippers.

Remember the motions you used when skipping a rock. Thats the same trajectory you are trying to achieve. Its like pancaking that bait off the water at a low trajectory'

I will also say that alot of docks don't see swimbaits skipped under them, I found some that skip great and produce.

I like low profile reels, it allows my thumb to feather the cast the whole time, its done by feel.

Remember casting in the wind, when you start to feel the over-run and feather the cast with your thumb to prevent the backlash, its the very same principal, except, it happens as soon as you release the bait, you have to be in control.

Don't try to skip bullet weights unless pegged. I don't like bullets for skipping at all. Florida screw-locks are okay, but normally, I don't skip baits that would require bullets.

I always adjust my tension knob by tightening it down some, that will eliminate alot of backlash.      

To get distance, you'll need some force, thus the thumb and tension knob are important.

Practice the motion of getting the bait to skip. Once you master that, then increase your distance gradually. Baby steps at first.

I practiced at a motel pool for along time on a milk crate. Practice practice.

X 2

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I'm a strong proponent of the K.I.S.S. principal. I use a baitcaster 90% of the time, but skipping a lure just seems to be best suited for spinning gear. I don't try to cast a weightless worm on a flippin' stick and I don't try to skip using a baitcaster.

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I use a baitcaster to skip. It was VERY difficult at first but practice,practice,practice makes simple. You must become one with the rod and reel.

In other words: USE THE FORCE LUKE !  ;)

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I agree with post about practice and using a spinning reel is far easier and requires far less skill, but...

When using my bait casting reels, I use a 7.5' rod and I tighten the drag very tight. I start the skip ~ @ 7:00 position and raise rod tip swiftly toward 1:00 position trying to keep the lure 12 inches or less from surface. I only get ~30-35' distance, but I can make some small skips without backlash. The bait casting reel is easier for me, but I can not get the distance I can with my spinning reel. I also recommend using a horney toad or some other similar easy casting plastic for practice instead of jigs. The owners do not like the sound of the lead jigs hitting their boat-houses. I also beat up some of my jigs practicing on my pier.

Dr T

Sounds good.  If I may ask, does a tightened drag reduce the overrun? If so, that is a great thing to know.

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i olny skip with my baitcaster .... i will say i use very little brakes at all ,, if any .... i like my reel to be free ,,,, just like when i pitch ....  its all about controlling that spool .... i just feather the spool as i skipp .... i use a little snap with the wrist and skip it out there .....

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