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ian515

casting vs spinning q's

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I dont get it.

I have two spinning setups, and all these threads I read, or pros I see talking about setups, they all love the casting rods/reels. should I be considering a casting setup to add to the arsenal?

can some one explain the advantages to a casting setup? they just seem like more of a hassel than anything, what with the constant birdsnesting I am always hearing about.

I have heard that you can run stronger line on a casting reel, but the ones that I look at, have a limit of 12lb test, anything more then that and you are in the hundreds of dollars.

so confused :-/

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Although there may be some, I've not seen one that stopped at 12lb test. You can get casting rods from $20 to $700. I have a $100 rod thats rated 8-17lb test.

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For me, I like casting reels better.  You can't control the distance (when lure is in-flight) as easily with spinning gear as you can with casting gear.  When it really comes down to it, its what you feel most confortable with.  But with a little practice using a casting reel, you will love it in no time.

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Although there may be some, I've not seen one that stopped at 12lb test. You can get casting rods from $20 to $700. I have a $100 rod thats rated 8-17lb test.

sorry, I meant that the reel had a 12lb limit

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You shouldn't give up. You will get what you pay for. I have a Shimano Citica 200DPV and it's rated for 10-14lb test, but I know people put a lot higher. It is running for $89.00. There are many other reels and rods out there. You have to shop and find what is best for you.

I recently made the switch to baitcasters, and while there is a learning curve at first, I don't plan on going back to spinning tackle.

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It's absolutely true that you can use heavier line on a baitcaster and you can buy good reels without breaking the bank. I use spinning only, but I used to use some baitcasting, but just didn't like what I considered their lack of versatility compared to spinning.

they just seem like more of a hassel than anything, what with the constant birdsnesting I am always hearing about.

Using a baitcaster is not rocket science and, in my humble opinion, nobody has to put up with "constant" birdsnesting. Just a small bit of practice, using your thumb and learning to use just two controls on your reel should keep your backlashes to very few.

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Contrary to popular belief, baitcasters are for the majority of the fishermen out there who do not possess the skill needed to effectively use a spinning reel.  

Would LBH agree?

8-)  :)

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Just because it says 12lb test that doesn't mean that is its limit. Most reel manufactures use 12lbs as the standard for measuring how much line the spool can hold. For example, one of my reels holds 160 yards of 12lb line and somewhere around 130 yards of 14lb line.  Even though the reel may say 12lbs its perfectly fine to go up to 20lb, 30lb, or even higher in some cases.

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i always thought that the line capacity for baitcasters is for mono line... so if you use braided line on there you can use a much heavier tensil strength but using the same diameter as the mono line...

Alex

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Contrary to popular belief, baitcasters are for the majority of the fishermen out there who do not possess the skill needed to effectively use a spinning reel.

Would LBH agree?

8-) :)

haha, that reminds me when I used to play the bass as a kid (the instrument, not the fish) and I really wanted a 6 string bass. my instructor told me 6 string bass' are for frustrated guitarists. ;D

thanks for all the answers everyone. my father in law has an older baitcaster that he hates, I might borrow his and see what all the fuss is about. for now I will stick to the spinnin reels though. I like those a lot.

cheers.

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Contrary to popular belief, baitcasters are for the majority of the fishermen out there who do not possess the skill needed to effectively use a spinning reel.

Thats funny!  Anybody who hides behind THAT is deluded.  

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I'm a long time devout spinning tackle user, but levelwinds are much better at certain things.

I started using one for bulging spinnerbaits and for buzzbaits because spinning gear doesn't provide the torque (if that's what it is) to handle fast retrieves with lures that pull back at you (spinnerbaits and cranks). Bulging a big tandem bait all day, or rip-cranking vegetation will wear you and your spinning reel out quicker. Similarly, levelwinds shine for controlling of big fish. They take some practice, but with modern magnetics the learning curve is much less risky to your fishing day LOL. Dial 'em down until you get the hang of it, then start backing off. Nothing casts farther than a levelwind with a tailwind!

LW's are best for heavier line and lures -1/8oz and up, and 8lb or 10lb and up. Although I'm not up to date on the latest gear, I've not seen a LW that really can cast light lures, especially with any breeze. Maybe someone will bring me up to date here and correct me.

But, going back to spinning, I think spinning is more versatile, once you get the hang of them too. (There's always a learning curve to get the most out of things). I often shore fish and if I'm headed to a new pond with only one rod, I take a spinning rig. Having brush or trees behind you just isn't a problem like it can be with a LW rig. And spinning tackle skips lures much better than LW.

I'd say, if you can afford it, and you fish aggressively at all with SB's and CB's (and you should :)), definitely get a good LW rig.

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Why limit yourself to either, they both have a time and place. I have both in my boat at all times and sometimes even a fly rod too!

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can you get a decent combo for less than $100? or is that asking too much? I know the thought process "you get what you pay for". all my money is in my spinning gear though, I really dont want to drop more than 100 if I can help it.

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You abolutely could, but I promise you'd enjoy a decent one better. Like you stated, you get what you pay for. While higher end reels usually provide better performance, they are also easier to operate. Wal-Mart has baitcasting combos under $100, but you'll see why too with all of the cheap plastic parts and what-not. Eventually though, it's your decision. Do you prefer price over performance? How long do you want the baitcaster to work? etc., etc....

Like another person mentioned, you can control your amount of backlashes by turning the brakes on. Turn those babies on and you can go all day without a backlash.

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$100? Probably not anymore. There are a lot of good rods for little $. Shimano Convergence is a decent rod for $40. The reel is the sticking point. Do some research and then check for a used one perhaps.

Others may have some particular suggestions.

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can you get a decent combo for less than $100? or is that asking too much? I know the thought process "you get what you pay for". all my money is in my spinning gear though, I really dont want to drop more than 100 if I can help it.

Wait on a decent deal for a Revo S on ebay and put it on a rod like the Shimano Convergence or something else in that price range.  You can upgrade your rod later.  The better the baitcaster is you start on the frustrations you will have.

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Another point: Stick to a name brand -get a lower line Daiwa, ABU or ...

I'd say $80 minimum for a decent starter reel (new price). All companies have these.

Although, Daiwa has a new Procaster that just came out for $60 in the latest Bass Pro catalog. That with a Convergence would put you at $100.

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i just added a casting rod to my equip this year and id say the major difference is the casting is a ton more accurate. also it works better for heavier baits

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Ah, spinning can be accurate, and quiet too. You can feather the spool with your fingertips on a spinning reel, similar to what you do with your thumb on a levelwind reel.

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