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shootermcbob

graphite vs. glass

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Can anyone explain why they prefer a glass crankbait rod vs. a graphite one? i emailed St. croix and asked what the difference would be between one of their premier crankbait rods vs same premier glass crankbait rods. The reply was they would be the same, have the same action, but some folks just preferred glass crankbait rods. My question is why? if they are same line/lure rating, same power and action, what would be different? Thanks for any help you can give.

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Rods of dis-similar materials can have similar power and action but each material will still have it's own unique traits. Different tapers would be used to achieve the same result from two different materials. In the end, either will work and it boils down to personal preference; what feels good when you fish it.

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here's the difference in my opinion, glass has a slower reaction time compared to graphite meaning it takes a little longer for glass rods to load up and therefore with crankbait fishing, it allows you to set the hook better.

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The two previous replies are well stated.  Some anglers say the slower parabolic action of glass allows the fish to take a bait deeper.  I can't deny or confirm that.  But, I can say glass rods are awesome when fishing treble hook lures.  The attributes of glass help keep fish from tearing off.  Glass absorbs the stresses of a fish that jumps or surges and the slow recovery keeps gentle tension on the fish.  I saw my ratio of fish landed on crankbaits really improve since making the transition. It's well worth the investment.  ;)

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I don't know how accurate this is, but I was told that a rod made of graphite is more likely to break if it has a slight ding or nick than a glass rod.

A graphite rod will have more "feel", but the very composition that provides more feel, also makes the rod more fragile once compromised by the slightest nick.

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I don't know how accurate this is, but I was told that a rod made of graphite is more likely to break if it has a slight ding or nick than a glass rod.

A graphite rod will have more "feel", but the very composition that provides more feel, also makes the rod more fragile once compromised by the slightest nick.

The rigidity that makes graphite sensitive also makes it brittle. It's a trade off. Graphite should hold up well if cared for.

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Can anyone explain why they prefer a glass crankbait rod vs. a graphite one? i emailed St. croix and asked what the difference would be between one of their premier crankbait rods vs same premier glass crankbait rods. The reply was they would be the same, have the same action, but some folks just preferred glass crankbait rods. My question is why? if they are same line/lure rating, same power and action, what would be different? Thanks for any help you can give.

According to SC's catalog, the glass rods are mod-fast action and the graphite rods are moderate action. The glass rods are also quite a bit heavier, again, according to SC's catalog.

http://stcroixrods.com/product/premier-casting

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Thanks Stasher1, I never even noticed that. Neither did the tech at St. Croix that responded to my email apparently.

I guess my point is....is there a difference between two cranking rods if they are the same action and same line/lure rating? Or is the glass rod the one with the better feel??? thanks to all who have responded.

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Hey shooter.  I am not an expert by any means, but I do own 8 cranking rods.  2 are graphite and 6 are glass.  I can tell you that the glass are much less sensitive then the graphite.  The glass rods are also slower and softer.  As for the higher catch ratio, I feel better with a slower rod (graphite or glass).  I have had some terrible days with fish jumping off in the past with fast action graphite rods.  This is why I have the cranking rods now.  As for what you should do?  It is a personal feeling thing.  Rick Clun uses a heavy power fast action graphite rod for all his baits, including cranks.  KVD used a composite rod, which is more like a glass rod, IMO.  I am sure no one would tell either of those guys that the equipment they use for crankbaits is wrong, even though their choices in rods are completely different.  I would suggest trying both if possible.  Not necessarily buy them, but maybe you know someone that may have rods and let you test them.  This is just my 2 cents.  Find what feels right and works for you.

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I had the same question about Crank rods. Then I picked up an Guide Series 7' MH E-Glass Crankbait rod from Gander Mnt. for $30.00. The mix of IM-6 & glass gives you the best of both worlds.

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The two previous replies are well stated. Some anglers say the slower parabolic action of glass allows the fish to take a bait deeper. I can't deny or confirm that. But, I can say glass rods are awesome when fishing treble hook lures. The attributes of glass help keep fish from tearing off. Glass absorbs the stresses of a fish that jumps or surges and the slow recovery keeps gentle tension on the fish. I saw my ratio of fish landed on crankbaits really improve since making the transition. It's well worth the investment. ;)

BINGO!

In a word, "forgiveness".

Graphite is lighter, faster acting and therefore more sensitive than fiberglass.

Fiberglass is heavier, slower acting and therefore more shock-resistant than graphite.

For fish with soft keyholing mouths, fish caught on small gap trebles and lightly hooked fish,

fiberglass offers more forgiveness. For bluewater game-fish however,

anglers have another motive for favoring glass blanks. Sportfishermen in quest of giant tuna,

and blue marlin have gotten away from graphite blanks due to their brittleness

(prone to shatter), and tend to favor E-glass blanks.

Roger

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