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KYntucky Warmouth

I just don't trust this thing

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http://www.***.com/Okuma_Trio_Spinning_Reel/descpage-OKTSR.html#

I am going to get a 7'L-ML spinning rod for crappie jig, bobber fishing.  I'll probably get an Okuma Reflexion just for the price and was looking at Okuma spinning reels and saw the Trio.  It LOOKS nice at first glance but then I noticed the joint on the neck

OKTSR-fr.JPG

It just doesn't look like a good idea to me.

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i checked those reels out at a bass tackle show a few months back (bass-a-thon)and those are some sweet reels !! i was skeptical too when i saw how it was built , but they feel solid . a very nice reel , i might get one soon . anyway , don't be fooled by the neck bolts on this thing , i think you will like the reel .  ;)

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I don't know the reasons for that rotor design, but they are common in saltwater spinning reels. I'm sure you could Google up something, once you know what that rotor design is called.

Personally, I think that reel looks really cool. BUT, and for me this is a big deal -the spool looks really small in diameter. I'd want to know IPT. Even then, small spools hold too little (lose some on the water and you're more severely compromised, not to mention the line handling issues. With fine braid it would be less an issue than with other lines; w/FC -f'geddaboutit!

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is graphite really all that far off from carbon fiber? I mean, both are made from carbon. I know carbon fiber is probably stronger, but by how much?

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I don't know the reasons for that rotor design, but they are common in saltwater spinning reels. I'm sure you could Google up something, once you know what that rotor design is called.

Personally, I think that reel looks really cool. BUT, and for me this is a big deal -the spool looks really small in diameter. I'd want to know IPT. Even then, small spools hold too little (lose some on the water and you're more severely compromised, not to mention the line handling issues. With fine braid it would be less an issue than with other lines; w/FC -f'geddaboutit!

That was my first impression, at first glance I thought "man, that thing looks neat" but just wasn't sure about the design.  Graphite doesn't scare me like it seems to others, treat it right and you shouldn't have a problem.  I'll probably end up with it cause I just think it looks neat, wouldn't be the first time I spent money on something I didn't need and realize I couldn't use it, anybody want to buy a Castaway Big Show Flipping Stick  ;D

I'm gonna be using it for crappie/bluegill so the spool size doesn't really bother me. I plan on probably 4-6lb.

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Could be wrong, but I've understood that carbon fiber and graphite are one and the same.

Actually, I believe graphite fiber is the correct term, because graphite is a flaky substance often used for lubrication.

I once had a can of graphite powder.  On my first lobster boat we made a bearing for the rudder post by adding the graphite to epoxy, making a "dam with a piece of waxpaper covered plywood secured to the outside of the hull, then filling the gap between the rudder post and the horn timber with the graphite impregnated epoxy.

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I don't know the reasons for that rotor design, but they are common in saltwater spinning reels. I'm sure you could Google up something, once you know what that rotor design is called.

Personally, I think that reel looks really cool. BUT, and for me this is a big deal -the spool looks really small in diameter. I'd want to know IPT. Even then, small spools hold too little (lose some on the water and you're more severely compromised, not to mention the line handling issues. With fine braid it would be less an issue than with other lines; w/FC -f'geddaboutit!

That was my first impression, at first glance I thought "man, that thing looks neat" but just wasn't sure about the design. Graphite doesn't scare me like it seems to others, treat it right and you shouldn't have a problem. I'll probably end up with it cause I just think it looks neat, wouldn't be the first time I spent money on something I didn't need and realize I couldn't use it, anybody want to buy a Castaway Big Show Flipping Stick ;D

I'm gonna be using it for crappie/bluegill so the spool size doesn't really bother me. I plan on probably 4-6lb.

With 4-6lb mono my guess is it'll work just fine. I have an old Quick 1202 (Med size spinning reel) with a very small (graphite) spool. I use 10lb braid and it's just fine.

Ditto on the graphite body parts. No issues with it.

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Carbon Fiber and Graphite are not the same material. They are both composites, that's true, but the strength to weight ratios and tensile strengths are greatly different. Carbon Fiber has the tensile strength (almost) of steel. Graphite is heavier and and has a lower (yet still high) tensile breaking point.

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I have had "Frankenstein" spinning reels with the bolts in the neck (one was a Quantum from the 80s I believe, and a Shakespeare from early 90s) and any that have broken has done so where it meets the rod, never the neck.

that reel with the Okuma name is more likely to outlast a lot of other reels out there.

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carbon fiber is a weave of cabon thread run in different directions and sandwiched between plastic resin making it alot stronger than just solid graphite and also alot lighter .

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...but then I noticed the joint on the neck.

It just doesn't look like a good idea to me.

it is an interesting design, especially the straight-on view from behind. here's what tackletour says about the unique design:

Unlike other reels where it is difficult to see where the aluminum and graphite come together the Trio celebrates the merging of these materials with clearly defined layers in construction. The goal with the design was to provide strength where needed and weight savings where possible.

from: http://www.tackletour.com/reviewicast09okuma.html

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A friend of mine is using Trio 55 exclusively for saltwater. He reports they handle 40 lb. stripers and double digits reds just fine.

Specs here: http://www.okumafishing.com/family/284019

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I bought the Trio 30 for a finesse rod, I love it so far. Very smooth and feels very tight. Feels much better than my Symetre, which is $20 more for retail. I got this Trio for 59.99 last weekend though, so $40 is quite a difference.

The 30 can hold 200y of 6#, 160y of 8#, and 110y of 10#. Thats plenty in my opinion.

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