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Rusty Shackleford

Question: Spinning vs. Baitcasting

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I have a question. I'm a lifelong spinning reel user, but this summer i'm taking a trip to Lake Cumberland in hunt/hope of landing some large stripers. So I'm working on putting together a rig that not only I can use for this trip, but also in the future for pike/muskie fishing. I'd like to put 20lb line on whatever style I choose, but have realized my options on a spinning reel are limited. Is it time for me to attempt to learn how to properly use a baitcasting reel? And if so, any suggestions on what kind of reel I should purchase, keeping in mind, I'd like to have a budget of 50-75 for the reel, since I won't be using it as often as my other equipment. Any insight is appreciated. Thanks

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The general consensus is that line as heavy as 20 lb. should be used on casting gear. Some use spinning gear for Stripers, but the majority use casting.

Try a search as well, this topic has been discussed several times and you will be able to read several more opinions on the subject.

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They make spinning gear for "Stand-up" fishing for 400-pound Tuna, so there is hardware appropriate for any species in both casting and spinning. There are many reasons you should learn how to use casting gear anyway, but the "excuse" that you can't use heavy line on spinning gear isn't one of them.

You just need the right size tackle.

I know of a couple of Striper Guides on Beaver lake that use mostly spinning gear for their clients, because not every one knows how to use casting gear.

I have some casting set-ups that work great, but for fun (and not-exactly expert fishermen friends and family) I use 7' medium-heavy spinning rods paired with 4000 size spinning reels spooled with 8/30 braided line, and a 14- to 25-pound test Fluoro leaders for Schoolie Stripers on Beaver Lake. These guys run up to about the 8- to 10-pound range. Sometimes you get bigger ones, but they're not the average. Great fun, and they can pull drag like no Largemouth ever thought of!

The spinning tackle makes it easy for people to cast spoons and jigs and swimbaits into the wind without worrying about backlashes, too.

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Spinning tackle is best for lighter line, lighter lures and when you need longer casts. I use casting gear for any line over 12 pound test or for braid with a diameter greater than 12 pound. Casting is best for lures 3/8 of an ounce of heavier but if you set the breaks and spool tension just right you can throw lures down to 1/4 ounce quite well.

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They make spinning gear for "Stand-up" fishing for 400-pound Tuna, so there is hardware appropriate for any species in both casting and spinning. There are many reasons you should learn how to use casting gear anyway, but the "excuse" that you can't use heavy line on spinning gear isn't one of them.

You just need the right size tackle.

I know of a couple of Striper Guides on Beaver lake that use mostly spinning gear for their clients, because not every one knows how to use casting gear.

I have some casting set-ups that work great, but for fun (and not-exactly expert fishermen friends and family) I use 7' medium-heavy spinning rods paired with 4000 size spinning reels spooled with 8/30 braided line, and a 14- to 25-pound test Fluoro leaders for Schoolie Stripers on Beaver Lake. These guys run up to about the 8- to 10-pound range. Sometimes you get bigger ones, but they're not the average. Great fun, and they can pull drag like no Largemouth ever thought of!

The spinning tackle makes it easy for people to cast spoons and jigs and swimbaits into the wind without worrying about backlashes, too.

I agree with Randy.

First decide on the tackle you prefer (spinning or casting)

then select the tackle-class required.

Roger

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If I had a dollar for everytime this discussion came up in the last few years, I could buy that new GLX casting rod I want. ;D

A spinning reel big enough to hold the very heavy lines needed for heavy cover and big swim baits prior to braid made spinning tackle a harder choice. With the new braided lines spinning tackle can be used for all bass fishing techniques. Fish Chris is a big bass specialist who fishes only spinning tackle. RoLo has fished for every fresh and saltwater species since the late Jurassic period ;), and uses only spinning tackle for bass. You should fish what you're comfortable with.

Rusty I think a baitcast setup for the fishing you mentioned is a good idea if you're willing to spend a little time learning to use it. A reel in the $100 range will make learning easier. I usually recommend the BPS Pro Qualifier. It is a great reel for a novice. A Shimano Cardiff might be a better choice for big striper and musky. It has more line capacity. Good luck.

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Thanks for the replies. Looks like I've got some thinking to do ;) Sorry to bring up a topic that i'm sure has been beaten to death.

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Thanks for replies. Looks like I've got some thinking to do ;) Sorry to bring up a topic that i'm sure has been beaten to death.

It is a good question and this is the place to ask it. 8-) If you buy a decent BC combo and don't like it you can always re-sell it. Good luck.

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I fish exclusively with spinning gear for fish on a par with stripers, using braid 15 or 20#.  As your price range is 50-$75.00 there good choices in spinning, but don't forget the importance of the rod.

I won't recommend one over another but in that price range there are good abu's and pflueger, 4000 series, using a med 17 lb  or med hvy 20 lb rod, sensitivity is not issue when fishing for these species.

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Baitcasters take some of the strain off of you when throwing heavier lures or working deep cranks, since they have more cranking power. You will wear out faster with spin gear. I fish with about 70% spinning gear and 30% casting gear. When I go on the water I usually take two spinning and two casting.

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If you use the right size spinning reel you should have no problem spooling 20 lbs test, if you spool 20 lbs test in the wrong size spinning reel you 'll have all the troubles you can imagine.

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If you use the right size spinning reel you should have no problem spooling 20 lbs test, if you spool 20 lbs test in the wrong size spinning reel you 'll have all the troubles you can imagine.

What size would you suggest? Any specific brand?

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If you use the right size spinning reel you should have no problem spooling 20 lbs test, if you spool 20 lbs test in the wrong size spinning reel you 'll have all the troubles you can imagine.

What size would you suggest? Any specific brand?

Go big, 4000 size or more, brand ? whatever brand you like ( personally I would pick a Shimano or Daiwa ) and use copoly, that way you won 't need thick line, 15 lb CXX will do the trick, that thing is ridiculously strong.

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