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can you explain jigs?

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I don't mean dancing either - my local bait store has told me to ignore these baits because they are too hard and only good for catching big fish.  Is this true?  

How and when do you use a jig - are they shallow/deep etc - time of year etc.

I have never used one and am also not cathcing anything so I'm open to ideas - thanks.

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There is never as wrong time to use a jig, never.  well,...winter in Maine might be tough but other than that....

There are different types of heads for different uses.  Swimming ones (swim jigs), ones that come through weeds better (finesse and cone shaped heads), ones for rocks(football), etc

Below is a real quick, very rough vid I made for Muddy last yr.  Just the basics to get you going.

I think why the owner discouraged you was because jigs require patience to learn and perhaps he felt you were looking for quicker results.  STICK TO IT faithfully and your confidence in it will build.  When it does, you won't knoiw how you ever fished without one before.

To begin with, I suggest using a 1/8 oz finesse jig by Terminator, Booyah, etc, they all work.  Using this size first id beneficial because you will hang up on very little.  It comes through grass and can be fished around rock, wood or any other cover like many other jigs but is very user friendly.  Add a craw trailer.  Spray with scent if that tickles your fancy.

Good Luck

JIGGIN VIDEO

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Yeah jigs are amazing baits. They catch alot of quality fish, and they will also catch alot of common size fish too. In my opinion if you want to learn to fish them, fish in some type of river where you have caught bass before. They tend to work great in rivers for me, once you get the hang of them you can fish them in more difficult places, like stick piles in lakes, and heavy cover. But I'd get a general idea for the hits, and how to work the jig before targeting the thick cover etc with them.

Go to a river which you know holds bass, and get yourself a 1/8-3/16 ounce football jig, it can be cone headed too if you can't find the football heads, I like to use cheap jigs in rocky rivers because you tend to lose alot when they get stuck in-between rocks. So my favorite jig for the situation would be strike king bitsy bugs in 1/8ounce or sometimes even smaller if the current lets me get away with it. There are many colors jigs come in, but the best standard colors in my opinion for jigs, would be black/blue, any shade of green, brown, and black. For trailers I recommend using Yum Chunks, (2.75 inch for small jigs, and 3.50 inch for larger jigs), or Paca Chunks, match the color of the trailer to the color of the jig. For rigging the trailer, I prefer to thread the chunk onto the hook, like how this hula grub is threaded onto the jig head in this pic http://www.conquistadortackle.com/ConquestJigPages/JigPhotos/FootballPhotos/SpiderJig.jpg. Some also prefer to just hook the trailer through the center like this http://www.lakeforktackle.com/Images/MegaJigCutFromAd.jpg.

Now for fishing them. Cast/Pitch or flip the jig out there, the best idea for casting the jig is to let it hit the water with the least water disturbance possible, a very "stealthy" approach if you will. If I can, I'll often cast the jig onto land and work it into the water, that to me is the most stealthy entrance possible. The fish tend to hit the jig majority of the time on the initial fall, or 10 seconds after the jig hits the water, so really pay attention when the jig first enters the water. Once some secs pass by without a hit, start slowly crawling the jig along the bottom. Don't just feel the rod, try and feel what the jig is doing down there, feel the rocks, feel the mud etc. When the jig bumps into a rock, let it sit for a second, then gently hop it over the rock, or make it make small hops, as if it were trying to get over the rock but failing. You have to think as if a bass is watching the lure, make him truly want it, try your best to imitate a natural crawfish, and remember crawfish are slow, and they do not swim, they walk along the bottom.

So the general way of fishing the jig should be to let it enter the water quietly. Give it a long pause. Pay attention to it when it first hits the water because thats when the hit tends to occur. After it sat for a few secs without a hit, start to drag it along the bottom, or hop it if it needs to get over sometype of structure, frequently give it 3-8 sec pauses, sometimes even 10-20sec pauses will get hits... no I ain't kidding. You can also give it a real big hop, so it imitates the intial fall, which is what the bass seem to react best to. But majority of the time you should tend to be fishing it with short hops, slowly dragging, and frequent long to short pauses.

Now for how to tell the hits. This is the subject when fishing the jig where alot of people have there biggest problem with the bait, they just can't tell a hit between a rock, stick etc. My solution to this problem is to let the jig sit perfectly still and feel it, when you get the "tap tap" you can be pretty sure a stick or rock didn't swim up and hit the jig while its sitting still ::o. The hits tend to be either a tap or two, a feeling of mushyness or something alive on the end of the line rather than the feel of the bottom, the vision of the line moving a different direction, or once in awhile which I call the best hit you can have on a jig - they'll just pick it up and run with it basiclly giving off a hard tug. Pay close attention to the line at times too, sometimes you won't feel the hit and all you will see to indicate the hit is a twitch of the line. When you get a hit, set the hook hard and immediately, bass don't tend to hold onto the jig long for some reason, so you want to drive that hook into them as fast as the second they pick it up.

I have only been fishing a jig since September, but I am addicted to using it now, it just catches so many quality fish and its so versatile its unbelievable, just a amazing bait that I can't get enough of. The jig tends to be a hard bait to learn once you start fishing it, in my opinion this is because you do not have any confidence in the bait until you have caught a fish with it, and any good fisherman knows you just can't work a bait you lack confidence in as well as a bait you are confident in. Once you catch a fish on the jig it gets alot easier from there on, so keep fishing it, and trust me, once you do learn it, your going to use it a heck of alot. I just recently caught my new pb on a jig, its a bait that every avid bass angler should learn if you ask me. Good Luck! ;).

Ps. You can also search under "tips and tactics" on bassresource.com, and read a few articles about jig fishing. Very helpful information there. Googling about jigs for bass can also find you some good lessons on learning the jig.

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I don't mean dancing either - my local bait store has told me to ignore these baits because they are too hard and only good for catching big fish. Is this true?

How and when do you use a jig - are they shallow/deep etc - time of year etc.

I have never used one and am also not cathcing anything so I'm open to ideas - thanks.

To answer your first question, no it is not true. They catch every size of bass. When I first used a jig, I just dragged it on the bottom. It's really simple. You can use jigs anywhere and anytime.

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Again, thanks guys for the information - the vid was great.  I wish there were more like this on technique and rig setup.  I really love life imitation type baits - reaction types mostly - like spinnerbait, jerkbait, cranks etc  I love the activity of it - I really hate something like nightcrawler fishing where it just sits there on a float waiting for a bit or bell ring.  Even when I trout fished I used spinners almost exclusively.  The jig grabs my attention because it seems like something you can really experiment with (trailers etc), use anywhere, and catch any type of bass on.  In my mind this type of fishing keeps the day interesting - which in my case is great because I'm not catching anything.  

I am wondering though - is there a depth at which these don't work - for example, can I hit 40+ feet deep with it and drag it along the bottom for suspended fish or deep water fish?  Such as off a point...

Thanks again.  I am going to buy a football jig for my next outing and throw on some interesting trailer.  

 

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I really dig the Stanley Jigs. They come pre rigged with a trailer so you won't have to waste to much time learning which trailers to try. They are pretty much good to go out of the package....

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Let me see; bluegills, perch, crappies, trout, pickeral, smallmouth, largemouth, pike and walleyes have all fallen to a jig on the end of my line. I haven't caught a musky on a jig but I'm sure that is because 99% of the time I'm fishing on a lake that doesn't have any muskies. When I fish a lake with muskies I don't target them but I'm sure they will go for some type of a jig.

I have caught fish from a foot or so deep to over 70' deep when jigging for lake trout.

Swim, jig, hop there is just no wrong way to fish a jig.

I that was my bait shop I would never go there looking for information or maybe not go there at all.

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...my local bait store has told me to ignore these baits because they are too hard and only good for catching big fish...

What NBR said...Find another baitshop!

8-)

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can you explain jigs?

Remove the window-dressing and you'll find that a "jig" is just a weighted hook.

I can't think of any time or place where it would be wrong to fish a weighted hook.

Roger

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You can be successful with the right jig in any depth of water at any time. It's the type of jig, the structure and presentation that makes the difference. But first in all cases,         "there must be fish there"  Keep looking, you'll find 'em. Good fishing    

www.ragetail.com

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Important to remember that all good jig fishermen keep a jig in their pocket at all times for priority's sake. Pajama's too! This way you can dream about jig fishing as well! Sweet dreams..............

www.ragetail.com

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