Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
blanked

channels, ditches and drains

Recommended Posts

can someone tell me what the difference between all three of these are?  if any?  if there is how do you tell what is what when looking at a depth finder at each of the three.  thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Channel as in creek or river channel where the bottom is cut out from running water of a old creek or river.

Ditch as in regular topography of the lake a depression in the bottom.

drain as in caused by run off and was never a creek or river channel and only flows water after heavy rain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Channel as in creek or river channel where the bottom is cut out from running water of a old creek or river.

Ditch as in regular topography of the lake a depression in the bottom.

drain as in caused by run off and was never a creek or river channel and only flows water after heavy rain.

the drain that i see on the map is marked as a submerged drain, in the same spot you would see a channel. the ditch is also in the same spot. both lead from a main lake into the back of a cove or pocket.  the drain and ditch is refered to as cold weather areas to target during the spawn which also tells me they are deeper structure areas like a channel    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest avid

Seems pretty clear to me  ::)

Channel is what you change when oprah comes on the TV

Ditch is what you do to the girl who looked so good when the bar closed

Drain is what you go down after poker night

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest ouachitabassangler

Cartography-wise a channel usually has current whenever a dam opens or of couse a river flows naturally. That could have been a creek or river before a lake is built. Those normally remain under water.

A drain is usually a waterway caused by surface discharge, which is normally related to rainfall or springs. It can be both above and below water. Any such feature that existed before a lake was impounded would still be a drain, current intermittent depending on rain or spring flow. Those are often shown as small tributaries leading into significant channels that have more or less current from combined drains.

A ditch is normally related to a man-made structure that existed before a lake was built, such as drainage ditches along old road beds, or formerly used to drain fields. They are not usually associated with current. A ditch would fall into the same category as a navigation canal or trail scooped through a lake with little or no current, while a canal diverting current would be classed as a channel.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the drain that i see on the map is marked as a submerged drain, in the same spot you would see a channel.

Sounds like it marked a man made drain... we have lots of those in Tx, and many are laid in the creek or riverbed.  It never made sense to me until I got into real estate.  The state (in Tx anyway) owns the waterways, if they are "navigable" or flow and this eliminates the need for easements from individual property owners.  

Figure it's probably a concrete drain (hole) and some large pipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In freshwater, the term "channel" normally refers to the depression formed by a natural river or creek.

In saltwater, the term channel refers to the manmade ditch that is dredged through a shoal area

where the borders are indicated by so-called "channel markers".

The term "ditch" is a word loosely referring to any depression, underwater or above water.

In a canal, the ditch is manmade, whereas a drainage ditch may be naturally formed by erosion.

The term "drain" connotes a ditch formed either by natural erosion (drainage),

or a manmade ditch in the hope of diverting runoff water during heavy rainfall.

All that said, the three terms are essentially interchangeable, and offer no clear definition

by themselves. A question or two is usually required to verify the exact meaning.

The truth be known, the "misuse of words" is the reason for all the confusion.

It forces lexicographers to add every popular misuse as yet one more sense of the word.

Roger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good way to tell is watching what you're depthfinder is telling you.  Use GPS, terrain association, triangulation, or whatever you can to put you in the right spot.  Find where the ditch and the drain meet up at and watch you're depthfinder.  If there is a change in density on the bottem with a slight change in depth, you're on your mark.  Back up off of it and start fishing or drop a jig/dropshot/whatever straight down.  

We (my team) used this to find a submerged bridge, creekbed, and road.  We found where all 3 met right before we ran out of fishing time >:( but now we know what to look for and where to go.  It's on next time!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×