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shootermcbob

how can you tell ?

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This may sound like a stupid question, but how can you tell the difference between a fish biting and catching your texas-rigged worm or hula grub on a rock on the bottom??? I have not caught a fish yet using the texas rig here in Ohio. I was wondering if maybe I was getting bites but didn't know the difference ???? Any advice would be appreciated. This is a great place to learn. Thanks to everyone for sharing their knowledge.

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My member challenge this month was to fish a texas rig soft plastic. I can say to me that bumping rocks is the hardest to distinguish between that and a bite ( to me only if you are using a weight). It seems like you are getting a tap tap tap. To me, from the few fish I have caught, not only is it feel, but you have to watch your line for movement. After a while it gets easier but you have to concentrate a great deal. I actually learned more from setting the hook when I wasn't supposed to as when I was getting bites. Sorry if this doesn't help out too much, but that is the best way that I can explain it to you with my experiences.

P.S. I don't think that its a stupid question, if you are just starting to use that rig as I was, its not an easy thing to differintiate.

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not too long ago i had the same problem...and with the help of avid i started catching fish in a t-rig....i think the most important thing he told me was this....dont get into a "feeling" contest with the fish, you will lose everytime...watch you line!!!!  if it jumps or twitches..set that hook...practice and you will get the hang of it, i did

Cliff

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I do believe if you get into a "feeling" contest with the fish, you will lose every time, so I avoid this by setting hook on any thing unusual. Many times with a Texas Rig or Jig-N-Craw the bass will simply inhale you bait and not move, it's what is known as sitting on your bait. If you wait for line movement you'll miss every one of these fish.

I always teach a newbie to find an area of clear water with different types of bottom (sand, sparse grass, rock), cast your worm and work it back feeling how each type feels, even go as far as closing your eyes. Once you have truly learned what this feels like and while you are fishing if you feel anything different drop the rod, reel the slack, & set the hook.

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Of course watch your line and if you feel any pressure or anything that doesnt feel right dont think just set. Also make sure the hook is buried good in the plastic when texas rigging, you wont get caught up as much.

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I watch my line....sometimes...  My 68+ year old forefinger is my 'best friend' as it curls in front of my baitcaster(you are using a baitcaster right? ;)) with the line lying on top of it as it exit's the reel.  If something "alive" touches it, I feel it.  That "touch" is unlike any "dead" object;  rock, limb, root, grass, etc.  Once you've gotten a few bites, nibbles(usually a panfish :(), or a 'thump'(often the entire bait/hook hitting the back of a Bass's mouth), you won't mistake the "dead" feeling with the "live" one ;).

Of course, using a 100% flurocarbon line and a sensitive rod helps.

Dan

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I have noticed that more often than not, fish won't hit a worm or jig while your dragging it.  You more often than not will get the bites as it sits still.  Watch your line!! Watch your line!!  WATCH YOUR LINE!!!

As your dragging a bait across the bottom, you will feel rocks and logs that will feel similar to a bump, or the classic TAP.  It is when you stop dragging the lure when you'll get bit.  WATCH YOUR LINE!!!

Now, keep in  mind we're talking about dragging a lure on the bottom, not hopping a jig, worm, tube etc....  

And like the others said....If it feels different, set the hook! and did I mention WATCH YOUR LINE!!!

for twitches or sometimes it shoots off in one direction or the other too.

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When a seasoned fisherman was teaching me to T-rig his statement to me was "Watch your line and feel at the same time, When in doubt set the hook" After hooking a few large rocks and many trees I finally learned what was going on.  P.S. Watch for the flying weight if there is no fish there when you set the hook.

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More than anything, it just takes time. The more you fish the easier it gets and you will soon develope a "feel" for the bite.

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The advice you've gotten so far is all good stuff. I just wanted to add one more thing to it.

Sometimes a fish will inhale your lure and it will feel really "mushy"....sorta like your in grass. That just goes along with the, if it feels different, set the hook. Another thing to is sometimes a fish will be running at you and it feels like you have to reel up alot more slack than you did the last time you picked up your worm. In that case, set the hook also.

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P.S. Watch for the flying weight if there is no fish there when you set the hook.

Oh man.. I was fishing with a partner on a night jackpot tourny, and if I had not had my glasses on, I would have been blind in one eye from a bad set. safety first, wear sunglasses in the day and clear ones at night..lol  :o

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The best thing you can do to improve the feeling of fishing with a Texas-Rigged worm is get the right equipment. I don't know what kind of set up you have...but having a Med-Heavy or even a Heavy Rod is a must. (you don't have to spend $200 bucks on one...you can get a pretty good one for $25 bucks) Once you have one of these in your hand fishing a texas-rig you can distiguish everything...I can tell if im on a branch and yo=yo the worm.....if i hit rock...or if I hit Hydrilla....I can feel everything...especially a bass...I highly suggest getting one....in one day of fishing you will be able to tell the difference I promise.

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The best thing you can do to improve the feeling of fishing with a Texas-Rigged worm is get the right equipment. I don't know what kind of set up you have...but having a Med-Heavy or even a Heavy Rod is a must. (you don't have to spend $200 bucks on one...you can get a pretty good one for $25 bucks) Once you have one of these in your hand fishing a texas-rig you can distiguish everything...I can tell if im on a branch and yo=yo the worm.....if i hit rock...or if I hit Hydrilla....I can feel everything...especially a bass...I highly suggest getting one....in one day of fishing you will be able to tell the difference I promise.

I don't think your going to "get a pretty good one for $25" but a rod with a firm tip will help a great deal.

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I don't think your going to "get a pretty good one for $25"

Simply not true.

The blanks used in the rods today are much more sensitive than they were only 10 years ago. I have fished with a guy who stricktly uses Loomis rods, and at times he was missing fish due to not detecting the bite. I was using a clearance bin $15 Quantum MH rod and was feeling every bite I was getting.

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I've found in my limited experience, a fish vs a rock, the rock feels like you ran into something, vs the fish feeling it like ran into you.  The pressure on the line is also a different flavor with a fish than a piece of inanimate object.  Its sorta hard to describe in words, and doesn't apply every time of course, but thats how I differentiate it.  

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I used a heavier sinker on my Texas-rigged worm today and , while I still did not catch anything, I THINK it helped me feel the rocks and such on the bottom. I did set the hook several times but each time I did, I did not have a fish on and I believe this helped me in feeling the difference. It sure would help if Mr. Largemouth Bass would bite on that worm to really help differientiate the feeling between a rock and a fish! Thanks to everyone who gave advice.

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If you are dragging a bait you will feel 'taps' when you hit something. When you get an actual bite, you'll feel it when you are not moving your line. Your line will jump, feel funny or just start moving off.

If its possible for you to do, go to a place that you can just catch fish after fish (overloaded pond) or somewhere like that. Just throw different baits and get the feel of them and how the bites feel. Time on the water is the best way to learn. Period.

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I watch my line....sometimes...  My 68+ year old forefinger is my 'best friend' as it curls in front of my baitcaster(you are using a baitcaster right? ;)) with the line lying on top of it as it exit's the reel.  If something "alive" touches it, I feel it.  That "touch" is unlike any "dead" object;  rock, limb, root, grass, etc.  Once you've gotten a few bites, nibbles(usually a panfish :(), or a 'thump'(often the entire bait/hook hitting the back of a Bass's mouth), you won't mistake the "dead" feeling with the "live" one ;).

Of course, using a 100% flurocarbon line and a sensitive rod helps.

Dan

This is what i do as well....i catch carps who will suck in a bait(bass will too) and the only thing that will happen is the line getting a tad tighter...the fish won't even move! With my finger and alot of practice i can tell the difference now.Most of the time i get the aggressive hit,but i'm always prepared for that light bite as well. If in doubt set the hook....

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More than anything, it just takes time. The more you fish the easier it gets and you will soon develope a "feel" for the bite.

This, in my opinion, is the best advice of all.  Simple and to the point.  

Just stick with it, concentrate and beleive you will get bit on every throw.  If you beleive that, you'll concentrate harder and things will fall in place.

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