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fishizzle

Heat as a biproduct of reverse photosynthesis

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Rotting veggies create heat for the same reason compost piles create steam.

Do you think that cooling water would draw bass into shallows for warmer water even though the oxygen is depleted?

What if its windy or rainy to stir up the oxygen?

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I find that as soon as the grass starts going brown the fish come up shallow. But the key is to find the grassbed that dies last, seems like every fish in the lake can move there. Then when that goes the shallow wood and rock piles heat up. My favorite things to fish this time of year are coves or inlets that have feeder creeks or rivers running into them, the bait fish will move as far up them as they can and the bass will follow. And it seems in New England even smallies will move out of the main lake to do this.

And as always fish wind. Don't know if it stirs up oxygen, but I do know it makes them stupid.

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Rotting veggies create heat for the same reason compost piles create steam.

Do you think that cooling water would draw bass into shallows for warmer water even though the oxygen is depleted?

What if its windy or rainy to stir up the oxygen?

The ammount of oxygen content is inversly proportional to water temperature, in other words, warm water can hold less oxygen ( in PPM ) than cold water.

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Raul is very correct with that statement.  Its also slightly less noteworthy to mention that there is a link to pH and DO.  The higher the DO, the higher the pH.  Somewhere in my fishy library are tables with the exact potential DO of water by temp, but I'm not digging for it.

What if its windy or rainy to stir up the oxygen?
Not sure what you mean by this.  O2 and CO2 levels seek equilibrium between the air-water interface.  Aeration via current, wind, and wave action speeds this process by creating greater surface area, less surface tension, and by circulating less oxygenated water to this air water interface.

The "heat" created (created by bacterial action, BTW) is likely insignificant considering the insulating properties of water.

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Decaying vegetation will have a negative effect on the oxygen content, true cold water holds more oxygen than warm water, but that is as long as there 's nobody comsuming it, in the case of decaying vegetation bacteria consume the oxygen.

The example or comparison of rotting veggies is not entirely accurate, heat produced by rotting veggies occurs in specific conditions and if such conditions could exist at any given moment in a body of water the ammount of heat produced by the process is not enough to increase the water temp significantly, you can feel the heat from rotting veggies because it heats the air around it, but water is 850 times denser than air.

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I have no idea as to the answer to your question,

I just have to give props to any bassresourcedotcommer who starts a thread with "  Heat as a biproduct of reverse photosynthesis" as the title.  

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I find that when vegetation starts to die that means the onset of winter and the bass will start to move deeper.  

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