Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BassFishingMachine

Finding bass in Falling Water Temps

Recommended Posts

Ok, the fishing for me has been getting pretty bad. I've been having day after day of either getting skunked, or having 1 hit, or bringing in 1 fish.

I think If I find where the fish are, I can catch more. The lakes have been pretty quiet lately, everything seems to be in a "resting state". Theres barely any movement other then a carp jump on occasion, other then that its pretty dead. The lake is like a ghost town compared to how it was in the spring/early fall. So this leads me to believe the fish are in a calm state, non-aggressive as can be. Im thinking they're most likely bedding down somewhere, and not traveling much at all. But this is just a guess...

I want to see if any of you guys can help me with opinions on locating the fish. Where do bass tend to move to when water temps start to fall dramaticlly? This is NJ im fishing in and the temperature in the morning has been in the low to mid 40s, from 1pm-6pm its been in the mid to high 50s, with the nights getting back down to the low/mid 40s. Hope this gives you guys an idea on the water temperature, or atleast a good guess, but I can tell you this, I put my hand in, and it was pretty cold..

So what my question comes down to, is where do bass tend to move when falling water conditions come into play? Do they go into deeper water?, do they relate to stickpiles, weeds? Do they go shallower? Are they suspended, on the bottom, or on the top? I believe if I can get a general idea on where the bass are, my producing rates will increase a good amount, or atleast better then the days I've been experiencing lately  :-/.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think Vertical

Think Deep

Think Bottom

Think Slow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, realize that rapidly falling temps and slow to moderate erosion of temps are diff animals.

Average the nighttime lows and midday highs to get a rough estimate of near surface water temps. With nights in the mid 40s and days in upper 50s your water temps are likely in the low to mid 50s. Water column is probably isothermic too (nearly same temp into the depths re-heating just not as apt to happen now. Unless you had a precipitous drop from recent temps following a real serious cold snap, then I'd not worry too much about winter retrieves yet. It isn't winter yet. 50s sounds pretty normal for Oct at your latitude.

Barring really rapid temp drops, in the 50s bass are still capable of chasing. Horizontal retrieves should still interest bass. In fact, oftentimes it takes some speed, or at least erratic retrieves, to trigger strikes. In the upper 50s bass can really go. At the lower 50s somewhat slower retrieves and/or longer pauses help bass commit. Into the 40s and slow becomes the ticket.

Keep at it. In fall, bass (well distributed in summer) may begin to bunch up more and you have to do more looking at least that's what seems to happen in the natural lakes and weedy ponds I fish. Don't let slow periods get your eye off the ball. Start with moderate and/or erratic horizontal retrieves. If no go try slower, but, my guess is you have to find em, and they should still be chasing at temps you describe.

Jerk baits are GREAT at this time as they can cover water pretty well, but can really be varied in speed (and pauses) to dial in to your fish. Also, slow-rolled single-spins/Chatter baits and not too buoyant cranks should find you some fish too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Paul: How much can you possibly know about fishing in the fall? You live in Colorodo, fall is 2 days long, then it's back to winter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul is originally from my neck of the woods, and what he says is what is working here RIGHT NOW.  I will say that the jerkbaits that I am using (X-Raps, Pointers, Staysees) have been mostly responsible for the toothier varieties, LOL.  It could just be a curse for me, though.  If picks counted in the last two TX I fished, I would be the undisputed heavyweight fisher king.  Big, bumbling, diving cranks wherever healthy coontail grows has been taking good bass.  I've seen a slight slow down on jig production, but T-rig 7" worms have done well on sunny, high pressure days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're a good man, Muddy. But you are a bad man too ;D

So how come no one is asking how to catch pike in the fall?  I have all the dirt!  LOL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Muddy :P

Actually, we are pretty far south, latitude-wise. But, my ponds are at 5500ft. There, it's about 2 weeks ahead of western NY. We get full seasons here. Up where I live at 8500ft, it's about 3weeks later than "down below" on the plains. Where I elk hunt at 10500ft, 10inches of snow has already arrived, twice. All this lies inside of 40 miles, as the crow flies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul : I hope we get a chance to fish someday, so you can point out the 150 things I missed. Your attention to detail is amazing! and that's for real, take it to the bank 8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not familar with bait and such in your neck of the woods.   But bass still have to eat.   In my neck of the woods, bass are just now starting to feed heavy to gain some fat for the winter.

Primary source is shad.   Knowing what the seasonal migrational habits of the shad are key on locating bass, they won't be far from thier primary winter food source.    

What type of bass?   Spots can go 40, 50 or even deeper in winter.   They love rocky ledges and such.

This time of the year, where you find one bass, your likely to find a school.    

   I would cover lots of water with moving baits that ressemble their primary food source.    Once you locate one, slow down and probe that area.

    One more suggestion,   if you have tried the same techniques, change it up.    If you always do the same thing, you'll most likely get the same results.

     Good graphs pay dividends at this time of the year when fish go deep, if they haven't gone deep, they may be in the back of a creek or up sunning shallow late in the day.

Also, bass will seek the warmiest water available, and if thats shallow, or in the back of a creek, probe those areas.

Hope that helps.     When bass go deep, spoons can be a great way to get down there.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×