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B0SS-H0G707

Catching the big one

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Hello to all, my first post here. I have read through the forums and have learned quite a bit, so thank you.

Having said that, I am looking to catch bigger fish. I have a few private ponds that I currently fish at and have had success in catching many fish, but none that I would write home about.

One of the biggest factors I've learned here is about the temp. of the water. I plan on getting a thermometer next season.

I'm confused on what I'm doing wrong though, I figure if there are decent sized bass, there must be lunkers as well. I have been catching bass that are in the 12-14 inch range, but many are not even registering a pound, except for a few. I've seen a few "trophy" fish just hanging around, but have yet to catch one.

So far I've been using mainly a sectioned lure (rapala?), with some frogs for the weeds, and an occasional rubber worm.

Don't get me wrong, I love just catching fish, but I want to know what I need to do to "up the ante" so to speak.

Specs: water temp = unknown, ATM

Rod/reel = spinner reel/ uglystick

Location = very clear "never gets fished" pond about 3-4 acres, in Northern California ( 1 hour north of San Francisco)

Replies appreciated.

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Well Boss as long as the water temps stay up I'd say the frog is your best bet for a trophy. It's caught all my big fish over 5lbs this year(including my profile pic). It's also my go to bait and ponds with grass are perfect for frogs.

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Welcome aboard!

My suggestion is a 6" GYCB Senko, weightless and weedless.

Make long casts parallel to the bank and out 10-15 yards from

the shoreline in deeper water. Fish the entire pond whether there

is any apparent structure or not.

Good luck!

8-)

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Welcome.

If you follow the advice already given , you have to get rid of the ugly stick and upgrade to a rod that has more back bone.

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I switched to bigger baits expecting to make endless casts and getting maybe a bite an hour or a day....it worked out to be about like that, but I started catching MUCH bigger fish.  

Fish often.  You will get the big bite at some point.  All this is predicated on the knowledge that there are for sure some big fish where you are fishing.  Big fish eat too.  

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Welcome.

If you follow the advice already given , you have to get rid of the ugly stick and upgrade to a rod that has more back bone.

Yes. You can catch fish with any equipment but to raise the probability of catching the big ones, you'll probably eventually want to purchase a more sensitive rod.  The big ones are less likely to strike the lure with aggression like the smaller bass.  You'll need the sensitivity to feel them.

Additionally, you'll also need a good eye on your line to detect any abnormal movement and you'll want to count your lures down.  When your lure hits bottom the line will go slack.  If you make a cast and your lure appears to hit bottom before it should have, that could very well be a big one taking your lure.  

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As noted above, your tackle will limit the type of lures and presentation that you can fish effectively. Everyone starts somewhere and you choices are adequate for the type of fishing you do.

Ponds can easily be over populated with bass if the forage can't support the population; this is one reason you catch the smaller bass.

Another obvious reason is smaller bass are more active and less wary then the big bass.

The jointed Rapala is a good choice for ponds, try a larger size in fire tiger color;J13 for example.

Another pond lure that you didn't mention is a buzz bait. You will need at least 12 lb mono for the buzzer.

Soft jerk baits like a Fluke work great in ponds.

As mentioned the Senko's; water melon red flake should work.

The problem with both the fluke and Senko is the hook size; try a Gamakatsu wide gap finesse weedless hook, size 2/0 and nose hook the Fluke, wacky rig the Senko, add a lead 3/32 oz sluggo lead nail weight to the head in of both the Fluke and Senko.

Remember the first rule with pond fishing; be invisible. Pond fish are very wary of any movement around or in the pond. Wear camo clothing and keep a low profle; you must stock the big bass as if you are hunting. Low light periods are you best times, go early or late. Fish the deepest water in the pond first. Most pond fishermen see bass in shallow water and try to catch those fish. The big bass may come up to check what is going on, then return to the deeper sanctuary area. At night the shallow water can be good.

WRB

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i have had great luck in ponds with a lake fork live magic shad, rigged on a weighted wide gap hook.  of course i dont know if these are available outside of texas.

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i have had great luck in ponds with a lake fork live magic shad, rigged on a weighted wide gap hook. of course i dont know if these are available outside of texas.

yes , they sell the magic shad at most wal-marts , i have a bunch .....  ;)

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Check your PM Inbox basshog.

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Something else out of the box you could try is to bluegill fish for a hour or so and then use them as bait. This willl proably work great in the spring time.

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Something else out of the box you could try is to bluegill fish for a hour or so and then use them as bait. This willl proably work great in the spring time.

Don't quote me, but here in california i'm pretty sure it's illegal to use bluegill as bait.  Do your research first!!!!

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I realize the expression is overused and it isn't always true regardless but try going with Big lure = Big fish.  Don't be afraid to tie on something a few inches larger than what you would ordinarly use.  Sometimes a big bass won't waste the time or energy on a diminutive snack.  In addition, a small bait might be taken away by smaller, more aggressive bass before it's had a chance to be selected/eaten by a big fish.  Therefore, a big lure can "weed out" some of the smaller fish.

As was already mentioned, not every body of water will hold large bass.  If you are catching lots of smaller fish, this may mean that though they're are many, the competition and limiting diet will keep the average size down.  Not a lot you can do except maybe keep a few here and there until the number of fish goes down and the size begins to go up accordingly.  This would obviously take some time to see meaningful results.

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As noted above, your tackle will limit the type of lures and presentation that you can fish effectively. Everyone starts somewhere and you choices are adequate for the type of fishing you do.

Ponds can easily be over populated with bass if the forage can't support the population; this is one reason you catch the smaller bass.

Another obvious reason is smaller bass are more active and less wary then the big bass.

The jointed Rapala is a good choice for ponds, try a larger size in fire tiger color;J13 for example.

Another pond lure that you didn't mention is a buzz bait. You will need at least 12 lb mono for the buzzer.

Soft jerk baits like a Fluke work great in ponds.

As mentioned the Senko's; water melon red flake should work.

The problem with both the fluke and Senko is the hook size; try a Gamakatsu wide gap finesse weedless hook, size 2/0 and nose hook the Fluke, wacky rig the Senko, add a lead 3/32 oz sluggo lead nail weight to the head in of both the Fluke and Senko.

Remember the first rule with pond fishing; be invisible. Pond fish are very wary of any movement around or in the pond. Wear camo clothing and keep a low profle; you must stock the big bass as if you are hunting. Low light periods are you best times, go early or late. Fish the deepest water in the pond first. Most pond fishermen see bass in shallow water and try to catch those fish. The big bass may come up to check what is going on, then return to the deeper sanctuary area. At night the shallow water can be good.

WRB

This is a very well put statement.

Fishing mostly ponds myself I can attest to the "stalk" approach.

The bass can "feel" you moving in and will shy away rapidly.

I also have had luck with white flukes, and in such mentioned "clear water" I would try shad raps larger than normal like the super shad rap these work well for us in clear water, and you can make very long casts with them.....Just a thought !

Although check what your rod can handle these are heavy!!!

post-17012-130163011016_thumb.jpg

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Something else out of the box you could try is to bluegill fish for a hour or so and then use them as bait. This willl proably work great in the spring time.

Don't quote me, but here in california i'm pretty sure it's illegal to use bluegill as bait.  Do your research first!!!!

In just about every body of water in California this is true, with a few exceptions. But definitely be careful and know which places allow it before attempting to do this.

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