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wavewalker

winds

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Wouldnt have a clue .... stop throwing towards the wind? Jus kiddin.

I also have problems with wind .... IS it stronger wind maybe?

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Maybe you just aren't applying what you already know.

Look for the complete opposite areas of what works with a N wind.

Ex: We have a flat that comes out off the bank,...theoretically, it's more like a rectangle of a point. So this means it has 3 sides that slope to deeper water, the E,N,and S sides. South wind, the fish set up on the N slope, catching food as it comes over the flat and off the other side.

North wind and they are on the S slope.

When approaching these things, pay attention to the direction you are casting also.  You want to present the bait the same as the natural food is coming, unfortunately, this often means casting into the wind.  Fortunately,....it works ;)

Just something to think about.

On a completely different note, it could be the front associated with this wind direction.  Where I live (New England), a N wind is the tougher bite but it's because of the front associated with it.  A N wind is usually a cold front.

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If possible I prefer casting into the bank that is receiving the wind regardless of direction.

For saltwater (Atlantic coast). East to ENE wind 15-20mph 3-4' chop.

West wind, may as well stay home and do some bass fishing, unless you like watching purdy girls in bikinis ( beats fishing sometimes) ;)

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When facing windy one must consider is it windy because of pre-frontal conditions, post frontal conditions, or high pressure blue bird sky conditions. Each of the above mentioned conditions require different approaches to try and scratch out a limit.

Pre-frontal conditions are the easiest to address because the bass should remain active until the actual day of the front. One should be able to catch bass in protected coves and on the back side of points. Just as mentioned wind blown points can be very productive but my I suggest you approach from the backside working you're way toward the end where the wind comes around the point.

Post frontal and high pressure conditions are a little more difficult to unlock due to the fact the bass will be highly inactive. The key areas will remain the same but you should plan on fishing real slow and tight to cove.

Bait presentations would be any thing you can cast easily with out back lashing; usually heavier lures. One should also consider fishing deep instead of shallower because deeper bass are less affected by frontal conditions. Due to safety factors I would avoid main lake structure and instead concentrate on deep structure in areas with tall trees or high banks that offer protection from the wind.

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Our prevailing winds are from the SSW and our waters run pretty much in the same direction.  So when this wind gets going even a light 10 to 15 mph wind it has a lot of water moving.  Boat control becomes a real chore.  Using a good trolling motor and drift socks do help so you can make as good a presentation as possible.  Once the winds get 20+ mph it is next to impossible to to work shorelines and points.  Working in deper water and drifting over humps works better if you have a boat that will take the pounding.  Other wise I head for a smaller lake or call it a day.

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Wind direction shouldnt matter too much unless for some reason your lake / area you are fishing is protected or something out of the ordinary.  Certain areas  for certain winds do matter... like others have said, it all depends on how the wind is effecting the area you may be fishing.  

I would say that most wind caused lockjaw days are more due to the atmospheric conditons than your wind.  But the wind can be a good clue as to whats about to happen.  For example, here in Indiana we usually have a west to north wind during winter stable weather.  When we get a big warm up the wind will switch to the south... great for the person fishing but that usually means the weather will be changing back soon and may cause you problems.  During the summer however its more opposite.  Stable weather usually has west or south winds and unstable weather is east or north.  Generally throughout the US an east wind is bad, simple because weather patterns move west to east and rotate counterclockwise.  This means that usually your  east winds are comming from the backside of a recently passed front (changes in pressure).  Light pressure changes the fish just hold tight, but I find larger differentials can push the fish back deep if they wernt to begin with. Don't let it psych you out too much though, a fish will always eat an easy meal.

This is an old time saying, sometimes true but dont take it to heart.

Winds from the North, dont venture forth.

Winds from the East, fishing is the least.

Winds from the South, blows the lure into their mouth.

Winds from the West, fishing is the best.

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This is an old time saying, sometimes true but dont take it to heart.

Winds from the North, dont venture forth.

Winds from the East, fishing is the least.

Winds from the South, blows the lure into their mouth.

Winds from the West, fishing is the best.

That is definitely FALSE if you're in Florida. And even more so if you're fishing the Atlantic off Florida.

Stay home and rest if wind from the west

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Winds from the North, dont venture forth.

Winds from the East, fishing is the least.

Winds from the South, blows the lure into their mouth.

Winds from the West, fishing is the best.

I'd say the author of that proverb was not from the east coast of Florida.

The exact opposite is true at least for saltwater.

I do this daily 7 days a week and the rougher the weather (east or nne wind) the better the fishing.

In freshwater you can almost always catch something, not the case in saltwater.  Just as important as wind is tide, tide is everything so a guide once told me and he was right and don't forget no baitfish, no gamefish around.

But I go anyway, nothing like greeting the new day on the beach as the sun is coming up.  For me it doesn't get better.

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i have more trouble a with south wind . more than any east or north wind and i dont know yy. anybody got a reason for this

It would really help to know a little more; like the layout of the land, the size of your boat, the size of your tmotor, the direction you are fishing, and what type of baits you are using.

Personally, I like to fish windy areas but my most fav bank on one lake I fish is unfishable in anything more than a 10 mph South wind.  It is a deep rocky place and you can't feel your bait or keep good eye contact with a South wind.

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does not matter what lake or river . weather its moutain .hilly or a low land. deep or shallow. north or south.its just south wind blowing north.thats .on shore or in a ship.

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