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Catt

Pre-spawn � Spawn

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This is how Ole Catt plays it ;)

Early pre-spawn: Individuals or groups of bass begin making short reconnaissance trips into coves. Only when the water temperatures stay above 50 degrees for a couple of days will any appreciable number of bass remain there for long.

Mid pre-spawn: At about 55 degrees or above bass leave deep water drop-offs and enter coves; the majority of these will be males. Weather and water temperatures are usually unstable.

Late pre-spawn: By the time temperatures reach around 60 degrees and become more stable will large fluctuations of movement occur. Many early spawners are remaining in the coves

Spawn: Full on spawning usually begins when the water temperatures stabilize at about 63 degrees and last until the water temperatures reach 69 degrees.

Disclaimer: Temperatures will vary depending on a number of factors and are not set in stone; stable temperatures are more important than what the number is.

Early pre-spawn through mid pre-spawn: second break line out from the creek with trips shallower depending on weather stability

Late pre-spawn: First break line out from the bank with trips shallower depending on weather stability

Spawn: Bank shallow out to the first break line

Disclaimer: Depths are determined by each individual lake, vary from year to year, & are for the most part controlled by weather stability.

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Ole Catt plays it well!  You make excellent points about the relative importance of stable temperatures and the differences in depths between lakes.

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I got a question for ya, what do you consider the first break out from the bank? also what do you consider the second break from the "creek"?  Does the break have to be, say 5 depth foot change or 10 foot change, or can it only be 2 or 3 if you were fishing a real shallow lake? same question for the depth change between the first break and second break.

Thanks guys.

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Breakline: A breakline can have more than one meaning. It can be another word for a drop-off/ledge, or a point of any quick change in depth. It can also be used to describe the edge of a vegetation line. For example, a "weed break" is the area of the weed bed where the weeds meet up with open water; or, where one type of weed meets up with another. The last example happens when bottom composition changes, as different weeds prefer different types of bottom composition. In rocky impoundments, a breakline can also describe a line where rock meets mud, pea gravel, etc. In other words, the most correct definition for a breakline is "Any distinct line that is made by cover or structure which leads to an abrupt change in bottom depth, composition, or cover transition

What do you consider the first break out from the bank?

Most easily understood by the last sentence

Also what do you consider the second break from the "creek"?

Picture in your mind where the top of the creek would be had the lake not been there and then apply the above.

There are no set depths required to identify where a breakline will occur, they are a totally random occurrence created by the formation of the lake.

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I would generally concur. You factor in the lake classification; reservoirs are very different from natural lake and rivers. Reserviors also differ due to the terrain they are build it; high land and hill land reserviors fall into Catts pre spawn description and are the most common types of bass lake the majority of us fish. Low land reservoirs located nearer the coast and Florida have less deep water areas and more shallow flats, the bass are less concentrated. deep canyon reservoirs like Colorado river lakes, will seek any suitable spawning area, even in the main lake in flat rocks.

Natural lakes tend to be bowl shaped, little structure, so the bass tend to migrate to the areas with the warmest water and protected areas.

Rivers; the bass move out of the current areas and into protected pockets and shallow flooded areas.

Big reservoirs can be divided into at least 3 sections; upper, middle and lower dam areas. plus big long creel arms that are several miles long, each can be like a separate lake by itself.

WRB

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The difference in lake classification as WRB describes only means the distance between breaklines will be either closer together or farther apart. All bodies of water regardless of classification will contain structure and breaklines regardless of how unobvious in appearance; even river systems contain structure and breaklines.

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The 1st post is like the "quick reference" basics you would over view as you come into the season. The index card info.

(I love it when members like Catt, WRB, Paul Roberts, rolo (?), Big O and many many more start in on a topic like this. The end result could be published. Listen up folks, you won't find this stuff for free anywhere else)

Great thread Catt  

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If it is totally silted in it may not have one as such; however, a 1 foot drop on the edge of a silted creek is still considered a breakline.

I have seen a one foot break hold a ton of fish if it is located in the correct spot.

I have also seen a one foot breakline created by wave action up on the side of a mainlake point be a killer spot.

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NH_Bass_Tard    

  We have plenty of silted in creeks here on the Alabama River but cover can play the roll as a breakline. In alot of places around here the edge of stump fields act as a breakline.

  Another good example would be a laydown that covers depths down to 5 ft or more. Fish will stage on this places as they move back into the creeks to spawn.

  The good things about fishing a silted in creek that has a good number of bass in it is that when you find that staging area, it will replenish through out the day.

Mottfia

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