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jayo123456

Is A High End Cranking Rod That Much Better Than An Average One?

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so I'm looking for a cranking rod...

for a presentation where sensitivity is key, I can justify a high end rod.

but for cranking where the hit is hard to miss, will an expensive rod give me a discernible advantage over an average rod? I don't own any cranking specific rods, wanna know what everyone thinks about this.

I'm eyeing some med action, heavy power atm. I'm a fan of Loomis, but will not fork out the money if I can't justify it. Maybe a mid range shimano will do pretty well?

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Typically, you will get all kinds of answers here about how you get what you pay for and recommendations for $200 plus rods. I have several Loomis crankbait rods, a Powell, a St. Croix, a David Fritts early 90s e-glass Cranking rod, and a custom Phenix rod. I can honestly say that I caught as many (or more) bass on a $39 Bass Pro Crankin Stik back in the 1990s before I realized how you get what you pay for. I caught my biggest stringer ever ont eh David Fritts rod. That said, there can be a huge difference in the weight of these various rods which translates to comfort--and some would say---sensitivity. When I mentioned all of this to my "old school" fishing partner, he told me I should just lift some f****ing weights! That early-90s David Fritts rod is a BEAST.

I'm not saying you shouldn't spend the money---I did---but the main reason for me was the quest for a lighter rod that would give me the same results as my $39 Crankin Stik. The graphite rods ARE more sensitive and I still haven't made up my mind on whether or not I prefer these to an all-glass or composite rod. I believe the Cranking Stik is either S-Glass or a fiberglass/graphite composite. Anyway, to answer you question: "for cranking where the hit is hard to miss, will an expensive rod give me a discernible advantage over an average rod?" I say NO, as far as hooking and landing a fish. Yes, as far as comfort. Based on the single Powell rod that I own, I can say it was by far the highest quality rod I've ever purchased for the money---i.e., best bang for the buck.

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Short answer yes, you'll notice tremendous difference. Long drawn-out answer is too long and drawn out right now as I am heading out the door.

(BPS Crank Stick is a primarily graphite composite with basalt fiber as well. and a darned fine rod for the money.)

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A friend of mine who usually buys Loomis GLX rods for most presentations still uses BPS Crankin Sticks for crankbaits. That says something since he's a very equipment-oriented guy. In the end, it's a matter of taste. If you don't own an E-glass or S-glass rod now, fish one before you buy. You may or may not like how they handle. Guys fall into 2 categories: willing to use heavier, less sensitive fiberglass rods to get the fish handling benefits, or unwilling to lose the sensitivity and familiarity of graphite. There are good crankbait rods in both categories. I usually prefer graphite. BTW, I disagree with the proposition that crankbait bites are hard/obvious and therefore rod sensitivity is irrelevant. There are too many times when I've set the hook on a bass because a graphite rod let me know the bait had stopped wobbling, and without feeling any other indications of a strike. This happens more often than most guys realize.

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Glass rods stop shaking when the bait does. I find glass rods much more effective at transmitting info when it comes to bites than graphite rods do. However graphite rods tell me more about what's on the bottom like shell beds and rocks. So I use composite rods. The best of both worlds. Look reel hard at the Dobyns line or wait till the new Varitas crank rods come out. I here Ike had a big roll in their development.

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I'm still using the original (blue color) BPS crankin sticks that I paid about 40 bucks for. I know that there are better rods out there but I don't think I will change because I've had such good luck with the crankin sticks. They are very slow loading so the fish gets a good bite on the bait. I can cast the bait a long ways also. I have 4 and I might buy one of the new ones.

Kevin

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thnkx for all your honest opinions. I think there's alot of unnecessary brand name loyalty (when it comes to anything), people will throw around brand names and say this is the best without ever ever honestly concluding to themselves that the product is indeed better. They just buy it because of the name, then rationalize the decision afterwards.

I'm a pretty newbie cranker though, so maybe sensitiviy is important, or there are other important factors that I haven't realized yet. But at this stage, I will take a look at the BPS cranking sticks.

http://www.basspro.c...204844/-1645901

aern't cranking sticks suppose to be more parabolic bends, with med action? BPS has all their's listed as fast and xtrfast.

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Jay, it isn't necessarily about being parabolic or fast, slow, moderate, Med, med heavy, or heavy. It's about having enough flex in the rod blank as a whole to protect your trebles. By comparison, the Crankin' Stick is considered to be a rather fast taper, but it is still built in a manner that it is going to soak up that bait and the entire blank is going to load. Far and away my favourite crank rods are Cumara Reactions. I've got four or five in the series and I wouldn't trade them for anything in the world. They're lighter and better performing than any E-glass or composite that I've thrown, and they are so easy to manage through an entire day of cranking. It's hard to understand that a Fast action Graphite could have a gentle enough taper to cast 6XD Strike Kings and RC 3.5 XTra all day without feeling it at all. Not to mention not having a single fish come unpinned on you. Don't be fooled about having the rod be Fast, or XFast. The 7-10 MH XF Crankin stick is one of the best "all purpose" crankbait rods on the market currently. It's got reasonable quality in components and it has a very good feel. It isn't going to be the same as a Dobyns or a Cumara, but it will perform its job very well.

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Hooligan has about sold me on a Cumara crankin stick :) something else to consider is that you can LAUNCH a crank on a 7'10" rod. Distance is important when you're deep crankin and you want that bait walking on the bottom as long as possible.

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Jay, it isn't necessarily about being parabolic or fast, slow, moderate, Med, med heavy, or heavy. It's about having enough flex in the rod blank as a whole to protect your trebles. By comparison, the Crankin' Stick is considered to be a rather fast taper, but it is still built in a manner that it is going to soak up that bait and the entire blank is going to load. Far and away my favourite crank rods are Cumara Reactions. I've got four or five in the series and I wouldn't trade them for anything in the world. They're lighter and better performing than any E-glass or composite that I've thrown, and they are so easy to manage through an entire day of cranking. It's hard to understand that a Fast action Graphite could have a gentle enough taper to cast 6XD Strike Kings and RC 3.5 XTra all day without feeling it at all. Not to mention not having a single fish come unpinned on you. Don't be fooled about having the rod be Fast, or XFast. The 7-10 MH XF Crankin stick is one of the best "all purpose" crankbait rods on the market currently. It's got reasonable quality in components and it has a very good feel. It isn't going to be the same as a Dobyns or a Cumara, but it will perform its job very well.

thanks...learn something new here everyday. I'm not going Cumara though, I have one for another application, can't say I'm really a fan, not sure why, I just didn't fall in love with the feel of them.

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how would you guys rate the bPS cranking stick in terms of stiff ness? I prefer a pretty stiff one, as I mostly crank deep 15-20ft+.

I've tried softer sticks that work good for shallow cranks, but when deep, it bends too much on lure retrievel for my liking.

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Bob P said "I disagree with the proposition that crankbait bites are hard/obvious and therefore rod sensitivity is irrelevant. There are too many times when I've set the hook on a bass because a graphite rod let me know the bait had stopped wobbling, and without feeling any other indications of a strike. This happens more often than most guys realize". I agree with that.If you watch Glen Lau's production of Big Mouth you will see why.

That is why I use a good sensitive graphite rod. They are pricy but will make a big difference. With that being said not everyone can afford to run out & spend a lot of money on a rod. Get the best you can afford, don't skimp because it's a cranking rod.

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Shallow: St. Croix Avid AVC70MM

Deep: Lamiglas SR705R

B)

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went shopping for a crankin rod today.....picked up a loomis glx senko. Wanted this so bad for a while, ran into a nice deal today.

gonna have to put crankin rod on hold for a bit.

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