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Cost Of Building A New House

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I know a lot of you guys either work in construction, or know a lot about the industry. So, what is the average cost per square foot of building a new house these days?

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That really depends where you build, who builds it, what materials you use. You can't get a good figure unless you give better details, besides a local manufacturer will better answer you on this.

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That really depends where you build, who builds it, what materials you use. You can't get a good figure unless you give better details, besides a local manufacturer will better answer you on this.

I built one about 4 years ago doing most of my own labor for about $50 per sq ft. My guess is you would be spending about $85-100 per sq ft. having everything farmed out. The points made above really tell the story though. I'd be curious to hear what you find from builder estimates.

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Location and builder often determine the actual cost. I know right now my father-in-law is charging about $100 sqft. That is not some monster palace with granite countertops and all. That is your basic mid-grade materials with 2x6 construction, driveway, 95% efficient furnace, Double Hung Windows with Low-E and Argon, and a 2 car attached garage. This is our local area here in MI. Just my 2 cents.

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I have a contractor friend who builds mostly residential homes. He made a very comfortable living until the last couple of years. Before the crash $100-110 would be in the ball park around here. I am guessing it would be cheaper now. He has not worked much lately...

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Is this your first house? Here's a few things to keep in mind. Some things you can cheat on to save money. Other things are not too practical to go with economy grade.

Do not skimp on the heating/ac system. They last for years. The better units will pay for themselves over their lifetime. Same thing with plumbing and wiring. They are permanent parts of your home. Anything that gets buried in the walls, crawl spaces or attics are not items to skimp on.

Floors? Maybe you'd like hardwood or tile rather than carpet or inlaid. Here, you can save a few bucks since you will probably change them in ten to fifteen years, and they are readily accessible. Electrical lighting fixtures is another place to save. Basic ceiling or wall fixtures plus outdoor lights for your doors or driveway.

Again, these are things you can easily change in the future. You can do room by room, or fixture by fixture, replacing them as you can afford to. Even countertops fit into this strategy. Go with formica. It will last for years and can readily be swapped for stone, Corian, or whatever suits your fancy.

You can do the same with kitchen cabinets, but you don't want to skimp too much. You still want a basic, something that pleases your taste (for now) that is durable and servicable. Cabinet prices can vary widely.

It's up to you to determine what you can live with now, that will serve you for a few, or many, years but can be changed without getting into major renovation.

Windows. Go with the absolute best you can afford, and take care of them. Doors, the same. Remember, the higher the insulating value of the units will save you in the cost of heating and/or cooling your home.

Insulation? Do it right when the home is being built. It's not something you want to redo in the future. It begins to pay for itself the day you move into the house, or turn on the heat or ac.

I'm sure I missed a lot of things, but it should give you a general idea. We lived in our home for a few years with the porcelain light bulb fixtures for ceiling lights.

Sorry I can't help you with price info. But the above principles apply no matter where you build or what the going rates are.

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Is this your first house? Here's a few things to keep in mind. Some things you can cheat on to save money. Other things are not too practical to go with economy grade.

Do not skimp on the heating/ac system. They last for years. The better units will pay for themselves over their lifetime. Same thing with plumbing and wiring. They are permanent parts of your home. Anything that gets buried in the walls, crawl spaces or attics are not items to skimp on.

Floors? Maybe you'd like hardwood or tile rather than carpet or inlaid. Here, you can save a few bucks since you will probably change them in ten to fifteen years, and they are readily accessible. Electrical lighting fixtures is another place to save. Basic ceiling or wall fixtures plus outdoor lights for your doors or driveway.

Again, these are things you can easily change in the future. You can do room by room, or fixture by fixture, replacing them as you can afford to. Even countertops fit into this strategy. Go with formica. It will last for years and can readily be swapped for stone, Corian, or whatever suits your fancy.

You can do the same with kitchen cabinets, but you don't want to skimp too much. You still want a basic, something that pleases your taste (for now) that is durable and servicable. Cabinet prices can vary widely.

It's up to you to determine what you can live with now, that will serve you for a few, or many, years but can be changed without getting into major renovation.

Windows. Go with the absolute best you can afford, and take care of them. Doors, the same. Remember, the higher the insulating value of the units will save you in the cost of heating and/or cooling your home.

Insulation? Do it right when the home is being built. It's not something you want to redo in the future. It begins to pay for itself the day you move into the house, or turn on the heat or ac.

I'm sure I missed a lot of things, but it should give you a general idea. We lived in our home for a few years with the porcelain light bulb fixtures for ceiling lights.

Sorry I can't help you with price info. But the above principles apply no matter where you build or what the going rates are.

Yes! Nicely said.

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Lots of good advice on here, so I'm only going to chime in with one last thing.

At this time, for the guy that can get his hands on the financing, it is a real buyers market whether it's a new or existing home. Most of the builders up here are sitting around dreaming of the good old days when they didn't need to look for work. I know of several that used to refuse building anything under $150 per/square foot that haven't built an entire home for the last 2 1/2 years.

A little research and you should be able to get a good discount on the labor portion of a new home. Now is the time to wheel and deal when these guys are scrambling. The only thing you want to make sure of is that the company isn't on the verge of closing his doors halfway through your build.

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One other thought. When it comes to the wiring, it will only cost you a few bucks more to have the wiring for cable/satellite and phone jacks installed. Better to do it during construction than to have to fish the line through the bays between studs after the walls are closed in.

In the olden days, they'd put an outlet for phone jacks in every room. The multi-phone systems only need to have the base phone connected to a jack. Still you should take it into consideration and have at least two jacks on each floor. Until (maybe they have them now, I don't know) they have routers for cable or satellite receivers, a connection in each room is something to consider.

A lot of folks like to have a tv in the kitchen and each bedroom in addition to the den and living room. It may seem like overkill, but it is a selling feature down the road.

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we have a vo-tech school in my area and they do this program where all you have to do it pay for materials and all the labor is free, addons, garages, new homes, all done by students and teachers to teach them. its awesome if you want a garage for just the cost of materials

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One other thought. When it comes to the wiring, it will only cost you a few bucks more to have the wiring for cable/satellite and phone jacks installed. Better to do it during construction than to have to fish the line through the bays between studs after the walls are closed in.

In the olden days, they'd put an outlet for phone jacks in every room. The multi-phone systems only need to have the base phone connected to a jack. Still you should take it into consideration and have at least two jacks on each floor. Until (maybe they have them now, I don't know) they have routers for cable or satellite receivers, a connection in each room is something to consider.

A lot of folks like to have a tv in the kitchen and each bedroom in addition to the den and living room. It may seem like overkill, but it is a selling feature down the road.

Don't forget the security alarm system. Some companies will wire them free during construction(so you will use them later). This will eliminate battery powered sensors...

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Depending on the wants and house size, the electrical is generally 35 to 50 per square foot. Least it was 5 years ago when I was doing residential. Also if you get can lights, DO NOT get those lightolier can lights. The trims warp and break. There nothing more than high dollar junk.

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With the way the market is right now, buying ia substantially cheaper than building. Atleast here in CA.

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With the way the market is right now, buying ia substantially cheaper than building. Atleast here in CA.

Absolutely. There is a glut of cheap houses on the market.

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