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I always remove the shields from spool bearings to get them as clean as possible. I have all Daiwa baitcasters. The larger spool bearing poses no problems. The problem is the small spool bearing: the one mounted in the sideplate. I have a difficult time removing these shields. Sometimes I can't get them both off.

I have started leaving one shield off this bearing. I install it with the shield facing the spool. It makes subsequent cleaning much easier.

Anybody see anything wrong with this?

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I'm not a reel pro by any means. But I know a lot of people run open ceramic bearings (with no shield) and I know several others that remove only one shield. The only problem I could see is that with only one side on, you have potential for small debris to get in and be trapped in the bearing. But, if you have taken the time to remove a shield anyway, cleaning is probably not an issue for you so you should be fine. The chance of much debris getting in there is slim to start with, coupled with frequent cleanings, I don't think you'll ever have anything to worry about.

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I always remove the shields from spool bearings to get them as clean as possible. I have all Daiwa baitcasters. The larger spool bearing poses no problems. The problem is the small spool bearing: the one mounted in the sideplate. I have a difficult time removing these shields. Sometimes I can't get them both off.

I have started leaving one shield off this bearing. I install it with the shield facing the spool. It makes subsequent cleaning much easier.

Anybody see anything wrong with this?

IMPO

No problem.. As often as you service your reels, it will pose no problems just (ease of servicing).

Tight Lines! :fishing1:

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For the most part, it won't matter.

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the side plate bearing can be a pain to remove I fish only Daiwa reels me self and I run all my bearings seal-less, I use ABEC7's from ZPI and TG Rocket and ABEC9's from a local dealer that hooks me up on price.

Use a #11 X-ACTO blade to remove the shields it works better then anything else ive ever used, just be careful because if it slips off the bearing lip it will cut the fire outta you lol I know how bad it will cut you so dull the blade first so it wont cut so deep if it gets ya.

On my frog rods and slop fishing rods I leave one shield per bearing and leave the shield facing the outside to help fight off some dirt and grime, but other then those I run only shield-less because it makes it easier to flush/clean and also free spool is a bit better. So yeah what you are doing is fine but if you want both shields gone just use the #11 hobby knife and bingo you got it in the basket.

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I'm not sure how the Daiwas are made but if they're like the Shimanos, nothing can get behind them. The bearing is enclosed and the spool shaft is in the middle. I'd say you're good. The only problem is there is nothing to hold lube in as the shield does that.

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The only problem is there is nothing to hold lube in as the shield does that.

How does a shield "hold" lube in? All a shield does is keep debris out. You wouldn't use so much oil that it would need "holding" anyway - just enough to coat the races, cages, and bearings.

The bearing is enclosed and the spool shaft is in the middle.

Just behind the bearing, the spool shaft rubs a spool shim. On Shimano, this is a composite material, and debris from that friction could EASILY foul the bearing. Daiwa shims are metal, so the likelihood is much less.

This brings up something I think gets confused - the difference between a shield and a seal. Typical bearings have metal shields. Some bearings, like Boca Orange Seals have seals. Seals are totally different than shields. My personal opinion for the average user - if it has shields, leave them alone. You'll probably do more harm than good trying to remove them. For seals, you better know how to properly seat them, or else you won't get the bearing pack to spin freely. It's probably better the amateur take them off and leave them off, and rely on frequent flushing and oiling to maintain.

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How does a shield "hold" lube in? All a shield does is keep debris out. You wouldn't use so much oil that it would need "holding" anyway - just enough to coat the races, cages, and bearings.

Just behind the bearing, the spool shaft rubs a spool shim. On Shimano, this is a composite material, and debris from that friction could EASILY foul the bearing. Daiwa shims are metal, so the likelihood is much less.

This brings up something I think gets confused - the difference between a shield and a seal. Typical bearings have metal shields. Some bearings, like Boca Orange Seals have seals. Seals are totally different than shields. My personal opinion for the average user - if it has shields, leave them alone. You'll probably do more harm than good trying to remove them. For seals, you better know how to properly seat them, or else you won't get the bearing pack to spin freely. It's probably better the amateur take them off and leave them off, and rely on frequent flushing and oiling to maintain.

The "debris" you speak of that could be caused by the friction material, can easily get by a shield. Without a shield, whatever lube you use will eventually run out the bottom. With the shield, at least there is something that has a chance to hold in whatever you put in. And I already know, the shield isn't "sealed" to the race like a seal is so, technically, it "could" run out the bottom of the bearing.

As long as I have fished with Shimano, I have NEVER had the the shim wear enough to produce ANY type of contaminates so I rule that out. Chances of this happening are slim if you maintain your equipment. I try to use common sense when I change something that someone else designed. Using this approach, I've been very successful.

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I replace shims on approximately half the Shimanos I service. The other half I flip them. The next year they usually get replaced. Weird detail, it's the metal shims that seem to wear out worse, if they wear out at all. You'd think it's the opposite. But whatever works for your reels, I deal in quantities that the average angler wouldn't. Everybody's mileage will vary.

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I do see how the shims can get dorked up if you over tighten them. I have machined some out of brass that work real good. I also made a punch and die that makes a dimple in them to give them the "spring". This seems to be a real smooth setup.

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That sounds like a sweet mod.

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Unless you're talking about a gear box or similar "bath" application the film on the part created by the lube is all you need. Lube that is gobbed on or dripping off just makes a mess and collects dirt.

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