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ReggieT

Help Going From A Spinning Reel To Bait-Casting.

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Hey Guys,

 

    For the past 30 yrs I've been a die-hard spinning reel guy. I now am ready to add baicasters to my arsenal.

    How difficult of a transition will this be?

    I read so many horror stories about "birds-nest, tangled line and the difficulty casting light lure, having to measure out every lure before you toss it"...that it has me tad apprehensive!

 

    Yet, the "Man-Beast" within is up for the challenge!!! :fishing1:

     Share with me your experiences in making the transition.

 

     Also what would be a couple of good quality reels that I could purchase to get broken in on (under $100)?

 

    Thanks

     Reggie

   

 

 

 

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First buy the best reel you can afford, that will help. I would start out with 65# braid (and a leader if needed) . Braid is a lot easier to pick out the birds nest which you are sure to get. Maybe start with a heavier weight  lure, properly adjust the reel for the weight and practice,practice ,practice, even before you go out fishing. Learning to use a b/c will ultimately increase your abilities and enjoyment I beleive. Shimano Citica is a good reel for about that price.

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The second and third pinned threads at the top of this section should help.

We also have an extensive library and videos.

 

Regarding the reel, buy a  "gently used"  Citica or maybe spend a few more bucks

on a Curado from our Flea Market.

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Plenty of posts on this.  Besides reading the pinned threads, do a search.  I learned on a mag only reel.  I would agree a Shimano with its centrifugal brakes would be easier to learn on.  Some reels now have dual brakes.  One of these wouldn't be a bad choice either.

 

I started fishing at 5, am 65, and switched to baitcast reels 4-1/2 years ago.  Us old dogs can still learn.  :teeth:

 

Some of the advice you will read:  Use 12-17# mono, or 40# or heavier braid, use a weight towards the higher end of the rod's weight range, start with side arm casts (if like me, your release timing will be way off), adjust fall rate as outlined in pinned threads or even a bit more, keep brakes high to start, don't throw hard, be smooth on the cast...especially on the rod's reversal.  Probably lots more I'm forgeting at the moment, but the wife is after me to get ready so we can get to the hospital to see our new grandchild.  :teeth:

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Read up on baitcasters, know your reel and its adjustments and get some practice in. Don't be intimidated by backlash talk and other noise. Yes, they can be annoying, but tens of millions of anglers use baitcasters and if they can, so can you.

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I made the switch from spinners to baitcasters last year. I started with a BPS ProQualifier and a BPS 7' M Carbonlite rod, followed the manual's setup instructions and took my time with a T-rig worm w/ 3/16 oz weight.

I started out with easy casts and gradually eased up on the settings and now am casting as far as I ever did with my spinning equipment, though I'm still a little more accurate with spinning gear I've used most of my life.

Overall I've found that baitcasters like to throw heavier baits than spinning gear, but I like the feel/sensitivity I get with B/C better.

Start slow & be patient, the B/C is worth the switch. Best of luck to you.

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Transition time will depend on reel purchased, time spent on water, and time spent practicing in your yard or a park.  I don't get to fish often.  Didn't spend much time practicing.  Thus it took me longer than a lot of others.  Some feel they are doing pretty good after a couple days, others a month.  Manual dexterity helps.  Having to retrain muscle memory from years of using spinning reels hurts.

 

A better reel will help your casting.  Not many new reels in that range that would be considered 'good'.  The PQ is one of them....$100 regular price, $80 when on sale.  I pretty much always suggest a centrifugal brake reel for a beginner.  However, a good magnetic brake reel isn't all that much harder to learn on.

 

The Abu Black Max and Silver Max reviews overall have been good.  The Tackle Trap recently had a deal on the Daiwa Lexa 100 that would also be a very good reel to start on.....or use on a regular basis.  :teeth3:

 

Otherwise I would be watching the classifieds a minimum of once every day.  Look for used Citicas, Curados, and PQs.  Might even find a Lews.  Look for a Lews with dual brakes rather than just a magnetic brake.

 

Up your limit to $150 and the list of good reels will grow.  :teeth:

 

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Check out Wal-Mart online they have lots if discounts right now. I like they because they support the FLW tour. I don't fish it but I support fishing as a whole. Checkout BPS too.

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Don't be intimidated, take your time and enjoy learning something new. Couple tips: when you get a backlash don't try yanking it out, look up the "thumb trick". Peel off a casts worth of line plus some and tape the line down with electrical tape. This way a back lash can only get so deep. Good luck.

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I recently made the switch too and I bought a bass pro qualifier with a bass pro carbonlite 6'6" mf. I learned using the bulk line they put on for free. Like you, I grew up on spinning sit-ups and I found the switch quite easy and I am really enjoying it now. Good luck!

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Don't buy a cheap shakespear or something not of quality you'll out grow It in a week and it won't help your learning experience at all.

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Don't buy a cheap shakespear or something not of quality you'll out grow It in a week and it won't help your learning experience at all.

 

Tired that route and it didn't work out well at all. Turned me off on BCs for awhile. Decided to try it again with the advice here I purchased a better reel, in my case I bought a Lews Tournament MG which was actually on a combo. I could actually cast with it. Not to say I didn't get birds nest and I still do from time to time. I then bought a Lews Tournament Pro. 

 

Spent a lot of time in the yard with a practice plug before I took it to the water. I also watched videos here and on youtube

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Be careful about casting into the wind until you have your thumb trained.  When you practice start by throwing with the wind.

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Be careful about casting into the wind until you have your thumb trained.  When you practice start by throwing with the wind.

 

An excellent point that never gets mentioned.

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