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mathnerdm

Will This Line Work On My Baitcaster?

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So I just picked up my first baitcaster (super excited to go take it out!) at academy, the H2O Mettle. When I bought it, they offered to spool it for me for free with their own H2O line, not wanting to pass up free line, I put up no fight.  I'm sure it's junk, I know, but that leads in to my question. So I wanted 12 lb mono line, but they didn't have any (upsetting, I know) so I settled for 10 lb.  My question is, I knew I'm gonna have plenty of backlash and probably end up burning through a spool way to quick, so I figured I'll just stick with the 10 lb they spooled for me till I get the hang of the new reel then go up to 12 lbs... Is that ok? Do I NEED 12 lb line for it, which is what the reel recommends I think? Or can I get away with 10 till I'm more proficient, then re spool it with my own stuff. Thanks and hope you guys can help!

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Ten pound test will be perfectly fine. If you want to fish heavier cover then I would get the 12# or 14# line.

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If you set the reel "tight", you lessen your chances of back lashes. As you get the feel of it, loosen it up some.

 

I taught my nephew on a baitcaster and he never had one problem.

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When I first got a baitcaster, I used 6 pound line cause I had a lot of 6 pound line. It was a horrible decision. The backlashes were huge. I would recommend using 10-14 lb line when starting with baitcasters cause it won't backlash as much, and it isn't too stiff.

 

When you first start casting your reel, set the centrifugal brakes on 4. Then set the spool tension so the lure falls to the ground pretty fast (around a second to hit the ground. Some people will say this is not the right way to go but I have used the h20 mettle a LOT and it does not backlash easy as long as you have the centrifugals right. On my mettle, I don't even have to set the spool tension, I can leave it very loose and let the centrifugals do all the braking (and not even have to thumb the spool). The main reason I would recommend putting the spool tension loose is that if you have it too tight, then when you cast and release your thumb it will not immediately cast. The spool tension holds it for a extra half-second (probably less) and the line comes off later in your cast action. This makes the lure go off to the left (If you are a right handed caster and you are casting side arm). When I first started with baitcasters I set spool tension too tight and my casts went way off course into trees and what not.

 

Oh and last thing, make sure you cast side arm to start. Some people will say cast over head, but I don't think that is the best way for a beginner cause if you let go a second to late, the lure will head directly for the ground and you will backlash.

 

That's all. :tongue8:

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The line shouldn't be an issue, learning to cast can be.

I believe this site has vedio's on how to cast a baitcaster. If the spool tension is set snug, the line slowly dropping when the spool is released with about a 1/2 casting weight, you should be OK.

The rod is a big contributor to sussfull casting. Take your time and make shorter casts to start with to learn the timing needed to load up the rod, get your wrist moving correctly etc.,

Use a line conditioner like KVD or TangleFree.

Tom

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When I first got a baitcaster, I used 6 pound line cause I had a lot of 6 pound line. It was a horrible decision. The backlashes were huge. I would recommend using 10-14 lb line when starting with baitcasters cause it won't backlash as much, and it isn't too stiff.

 

When you first start casting your reel, set the centrifugal brakes on 4. Then set the spool tension so the lure falls to the ground pretty fast (around a second to hit the ground. Some people will say this is not the right way to go but I have used the h20 mettle a LOT and it does not backlash easy as long as you have the centrifugals right. On my mettle, I don't even have to set the spool tension, I can leave it very loose and let the centrifugals do all the braking (and not even have to thumb the spool). The main reason I would recommend putting the spool tension loose is that if you have it too tight, then when you cast and release your thumb it will not immediately cast. The spool tension holds it for a extra half-second (probably less) and the line comes off later in your cast action. This makes the lure go off to the left (If you are a right handed caster and you are casting side arm). When I first started with baitcasters I set spool tension too tight and my casts went way off course into trees and what not.

 

Oh and last thing, make sure you cast side arm to start. Some people will say cast over head, but I don't think that is the best way for a beginner cause if you let go a second to late, the lure will head directly for the ground and you will backlash.

 

That's all. :tongue8:

. Awesome tips! Thanks a lot! I've actually been casting with a cheapo rod side arm to practice getting used to it cuz I knew I was getting a baitcaster. One more thing, I'm going to look it up but if I can't find anything maybe you can help, how do you set your drag on your baitcasters? If I recall it's different than a spinning reel so what do you recommend?

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1/3rd the line # test for mono or FC line.

PS; don't practice bad habits!

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1/3rd the line # test for mono or FC line.

PS; don't practice bad habits!

I heard that before so I'll probably try that if you say the way I did it wasn't good. I hooked it to a fence post, and simulated setting and just kinda tightened it for what would be a decent size bass. With a stationary object, you do want the spool to spin a little when setting the hook relatively hard, right? And for anybody who cares, I took it out and just put some bullet weights on the line (3/8 ounce) and just started casting into grass in my backyard. It was a blast. Only did around 30 casts because it was dark, and small sinkers when you can't see much and tell when its going to hit makes it a little tough lol. Out of the 30 I only had 4 birdsnest, none of which were too bad. I think that's not too bad of a start, given the furthest I casted was about 30 feet it isn't all too impressive either. Just wanted to let you guys know I had a great time just practicing and can't wait to get the line wet!

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I heard that before so I'll probably try that if you say the way I did it wasn't good. I hooked it to a fence post, and simulated setting and just kinda tightened it for what would be a decent size bass. With a stationary object, you do want the spool to spin a little when setting the hook relatively hard, right? And for anybody who cares, I took it out and just put some bullet weights on the line (3/8 ounce) and just started casting into grass in my backyard. It was a blast. Only did around 30 casts because it was dark, and small sinkers when you can't see much and tell when its going to hit makes it a little tough lol. Out of the 30 I only had 4 birdsnest, none of which were too bad. I think that's not too bad of a start, given the furthest I casted was about 30 feet it isn't all too impressive either. Just wanted to let you guys know I had a great time just practicing and can't wait to get the line wet!

I wouldn't worry about distance at all. That will come naturally when you really start getting the hang of it. I know it can be a little frustrating at first and I've only been on a BC for about two months now. Now im really comfortable getting casts out there. It's like learning to golf. Get the right technique down and the distance will come in time.

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10 will be fine. 

 

Well said....the differences between 10# and 12# are minute.

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10 and 12 have hardly any difference so you should be fine. And try out Fluorocarbon too! Haha I use it 80% of the time other than when I'm froggin' or flipping.

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