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*Hootie

Clear, Stained, Murky

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Can someone give me a measured definition. I read, Colorado blades for murky waters, willow leaf blades for clear. I ask because most spinnerbaits are willow leaf. My lake, I consider murky. Don't really know what to base a decision on.

Hootie

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Visibility depends upon the density of suspended particles ( regardless of the nature ) and/or diluted compounds, so "clear" more than 45 cm of visibility, " murky " less than 45 cm of visibility those terms apply to suspended matter organic or inorganic. "Stained" refers to disolved compounds an is usually associated to a dertain coloration, more ammount of compunds dissolved = more color = more "stain" , a good example of stain is waters where there is a lot of dissolved compunds from decayong vegetation in and around the water, for example, tannic acids which provide water with a characteristic tea/coffee color. Now, as usual, I am completely against any kind of "ruleisation" like the one you mention, to me choosing which blade style depend on several factors, visibility is one, depth is another, speed and lift ( how much the spinnerbait rises depending upon speed retrieval ) are also taken in consideration. Finish is also another thing I consider, a smooth surface reflects less light then a hammered or diamond patterned one. If I'm going to fish deep and want to keep the bait deep I'm going to choose the blade that creates the less amount of lift ( willowleaf ) preferably with a hammered surface so it traps the most available light at depth, if I'm going to fish above weeds then I would choose more lift, a duoble colorado has the most lift.

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Blades surely do make a difference in lift, and, so does weight....Tie on a 1 to 1 1/2 oz. spinnerbait and you will quickly be in deeper water no matter which blades are used. Rate of retrieve also contributes.......I mostly use a 3/8th oz with willow blades in clear water......I prefer stained water as it allows more flexibility on lure choices. 

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If I'm not mistaken, the old Color-C-Lector unit guideline, which also used clear, stained and murky was 0'-2' (murky), 2'-4' (stained), and greater than 4' visibility (clear). Might be a good starting basis, and then adapt to your local waters.

 

-T9

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I'm a little surprised, no one has elaborated on blade colors, as in gold, silver or painted blades. Even the older powerbait spinnerbaits ( Jay Yelias) had clear polycarbonate blades.. Blade shape plus finish plus # of blades plus weight of spinnerbait plus skirt color and no wonder there's a lot of questions on the topic, oh, frame material, stainless, titanium, etc.. I'm confused just tapping this out.. Lol. I really liked the Spro model that had I think it was 4 willow blades, looked great in the water and caught good numbers. I work a 3/4 to 1 oz at night, with a big Colorodo blade in the areas adjacent to river channels.. Other than that I don't use them much now.

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Willow leaf blades give more flash, colorado blades give more vibration, and indiana blades are inbetween. The idea being that in murky or stained or in my case this year cloudy water the colorado blade will attract the fish more because it will appeal to the fishes senses other than sight.  

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Gold Colorado blades for the vibration in muddy and heavily stained water.

 

Of course, you know the bass will have to tell you what they want.

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Can someone give me a measured definition. I read, Colorado blades for murky waters, willow leaf blades for clear. I ask because most spinnerbaits are willow leaf. My lake, I consider murky. Don't really know what to base a decision on.

Hootie

 

As simply as I can explain how I learned it.

 

All blades give you flash (visibility) and vibrations.  Willow give more flash and less vibration, while Colorado gives you the opposite.  Indiana blades are in the middle of the two.  Taking these facts into consideration, you can assume that the lower the visibility, the more the bass needs to use the vibration of a lure to locate it.

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I've always believed in the willow blades were for running shallower, and colorado were for running deeper. This being attributed to the shapes (a willow will naturally cut through the water better because it's so slender). 

 

As for water color/clarity, that is where the blade color is more important. Silver=sunny is the moto I was always taught. And then gold for muddier water. 

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I am getting a lot of good information, but more about spinnerbaits than water clarity.

Let me ask this way:

My favorite lake NEVER has more than 10 inches visability.

Under these conditions, would you bother with a willow leaf spinnerbait?

Hootie

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Hootie, spring/summer I would burn the willowleaf just under the surface.  When I lived in OK, the lake I lived and fished on was always murky/muddy.  Only time the willow worked was when it was burned.  Other then that all my fish came off colorado blades.  Black and Chart/white being the best for the colorado baits and all white for the willow bladed spinnerbait, although I did have good success with chart/white buzz baits so..... But that would be the only time I would use a willowleaf blade in murky water with the vis you have. 

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I would use a 3/4 oz. chartreuse spinnerbait with a large, heavy-duty Colorado blade. Willow blades are meant for faster speed, and Colorado blades are meant for getting a good vibration at slower speeds. Slow is the way to go if you want to go deeper.

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Every where I fish ;)

1/2 oz, double gold willow leaf, & white skirt or charteuse/white skirt.

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I exclusively use chartreuse/white for my purposes, but in muddy water you will probably want a firetiger, chartreuse, or even red.

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Can someone give me a measured definition. I read, Colorado blades for murky waters, willow leaf blades for clear. I ask because most spinnerbaits are willow leaf. My lake, I consider murky. Don't really know what to base a decision on.

Hootie

colorado blades = more vibration and lift

willow leaf blades = less lift, more flash

indiana blades = even amount of flash, vibration, and lift

 

gold blades = best in stained water

silver blades = best in clear water

chartruse/colored blades = best in murky water

 

the sliver blades in clear water have a bright white flash to them, bass love that.

the gold blades flash in stained water can help the bait stand out and provides just enough contrast between the water color and blade.

chartruse/colored blades are good when you dont need a lot of flash but want the bait to stand out in murky water.

 

also willow leaf blades come through weeds better than colorado, agin indiana blades are somewhere between the two.

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I fish mostly very clear waters, and , use a 3/8th oz charteuse and white skirt, silver blades, in or close to weeds, pads, wood , or any type cover available. I fish fast retrieve mixed with sudden stops and starts especially if near weed walls , mostly shallower water out to deep water.

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Surprised no one has mentioned the good ole Indiana blade spinner bait . Colorado blade with a twist , you can slow roll and crank aggressively . Booyah makes them in silver and gold blade combinations . I have had success with this one setup more so than others just to more depth control and able to switch tactics . 

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Surprised no one has mentioned the good ole Indiana blade spinner bait . Colorado blade with a twist , you can slow roll and crank aggressively . Booyah makes them in silver and gold blade combinations . I have had success with this one setup more so than others just to more depth control and able to switch tactics . 

i mentioned the indiana in my last post. there are also oaklahoma blades. lol

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So what about the water color?

i spoke on that as well.

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i mentioned the indiana in my last post. there are also oaklahoma blades. lol

 

Did not know that my apologies ,  intro my  Bobby Boucher quote " now you know dat  " .

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I actually like colored blades in clear water.

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i spoke on that as well.

 

Actually all you mentioned is what to use in clear, stained, or murky water.

What defines clear, stained, and murky.

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i mentioned the indiana in my last post. there are also oaklahoma blades. lol

Did not know that my apologies ,  intro Bobby Boucher quote " now you know dat  " .

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Did not know that my apologies ,  intro my  Bobby Boucher quote " now you know dat  " .

lol no prob

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